Jun 02, 2020  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Theater

  
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    THEA 454 - Advanced Costume Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 352 ) The purpose of this course is to develop the artistic and practical aspects of designing costumes, building on previous training. The emphasis is placed on the design process and will include interpretation, character development, rendering techniques and design presentation. S, even years.
  
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    THEA 455 - Advanced Scene Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 355 ) The purpose of this course is to develop the artistic and practical aspects of designing scenery for theatre, building on previous training. The emphasis is placed on the design process and will include interpretation, rendering techniques, modeling, advanced drafting, digital modeling and design presentation. F, even years.
  
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    THEA 456 - Advanced Lighting Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 356 ) The purpose of this course is to develop the artistic and practical aspects of designing lighting for live entertainment, building on previous training. The emphasis is placed on the design process and will include interpretation, advanced drafting, color theory and presentation of design. The course will include advanced electrical application. F, odd years.
  
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    THEA 460 - Acting IV Studio (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 450 , B.F.A. program only, or by permission of the instructor) A studio based course that explores the physical and vocal demands of period acting. Study of classical poets/dramatists. Historical research expected along with text analyses, scoring of text and critical evaluation of a specific classical playwright’s work. This course combines extensive table work with exploration of applied acting techniques from the previous acting courses. In addition, an exploration of the physical and vocal demands of period acting as well as the historical context of each text are addressed. The work culminates in advanced monologue, sonnet or scene work. S.
  
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    THEA 462 - Dramatic Theory and Criticism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 160  and ENGL 425 ) An examination of the major theoretical treatises regarding theatre and performance arts from Aristotle to the present. F.
  
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    THEA 472 - Movement for the Actor II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 372 ) This course is a rigorous studio based course that explores, in depth, an established study of actor training that employs a physical approach to realizing theatrical work. This advanced course will build upon the precepts and exercises employed in Movement I and will culminate in a performance using the garnered techniques. S.
  
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    THEA 491 - Special Topics: New Works Development (3 credits)


    Topics in the areas of theatre that result in the creation of a new work in dramatic literature, performance, or design. Special Topics courses will be announced and described prior to early registration each semester.
  
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    THEA 495A - Theatre Internship (3-15 credits)


    (Prereq: at least 60 credit hours and permission of the instructor) Internship projects are defined as individualized professionally-oriented experiences undertaken with faculty supervision to supplement or complement the student’s academic programs. The guided internship requires 40 hours of on-site work per credit hour, a journal, a final paper and a final project or performance. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their field of study, and to enhance networking opportunities. S.
  
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    THEA 495B - Theatre Internship (15 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 495A ) Continuation of internship from THEA 495A. S.
  
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    THEA 497 - Theatre Design and Production Capstone (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Senior standing and B.F.A. Theatre Arts major) Each student plans and executes one significant project in the area of theatre design and technology which demonstrates significant proficiency in one or more theatrical elements. Supervised by a member of the theatre faculty, the project incorporates research, documentation and a public exhibition. S.
  
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    THEA 498 - Musical Theatre Capstone (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Senior standing and B.F.A. Theatre Arts major) In the final semester, each student plans and executes a project which demonstrates significant proficiency in singing, dancing, and acting. Supervised by a member of the Performing Arts Faculty, the project incorporates research, documentation, an audition portfolio, and a public performance. S.
  
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    THEA 499 - Acting Capstone (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Senior standing and B.F.A. Theatre Arts major) Each student plans and executes a project which demonstrates significant proficiency in one or more theatrical performance elements. Supervised by a member of the theatre faculty, the project will incorporate research, documentation, and a public performance. S.

University

  
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    UNIV 100 - Seminar in Leadership Development (2 credits)


    Leadership and organizational theories, leadership styles, decision-making techniques, service learning, team building and communication skills with an opportunity to apply learning during class discussions and activities. F.
  
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    UNIV 105 - Academic Improvement Hour (0 credits)


    This course is designed to provide students with the techniques to improve academic performance. Critical skills covered in this course include, but are not limited to, comprehension, reasoning, organization, planning, and effective communication. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 110 Q - First Year Experience (3 credits)


    Designed to enhance the satisfaction and success of first year students. The course focuses on developing critical and creative thinking, information literacy skills, improving written and oral communication skills, setting personal and academic goals, developing structured and consistent study habits, practicing effective time management, and becoming contributing members of the Coastal community. This course is a university graduation requirement and must be completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 122 Q* - Introduction to Sustainability (3 credits)


    An introduction to the basic concepts and understanding of sustainability locally and globally. Topics will focus around the three pillars of sustainability; environment, economic and social, as well as topics such as waste reduction, consumer choices, energy, transportation, and natural resources. The field of sustainability continues to evolve, especially as awareness spreads about scarce resources on a crowded planet. Students will also explore sustainability through experiential learning activities and create a research-based presentation. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 129 - University Gospel Choir (1 credit)


    A course offering students an opportunity to learn gospel music and to sing at gospel gatherings across the state. Students should check with their major department regarding applicable degree credit. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 150 - Career Exploration (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide the student with the skills necessary to make effective career decisions. A realistic assessment of self, identification of possible career fields and occupations, and methods of developing and implementing a plan of action will be emphasized. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 200 - Student Media Production (1 credit)


    Supervised participation in the production of student media, including the student newspaper, magazine, or literary journal. This course may be repeated for credit, but no more than eight total credits from University 200 may be applied toward a degree. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 202 - All Media Class (2 credits)


    (Prereq: New stipend student on staff of Student Media) A course exploring the production, printing and design of publications. The class focuses on the printing processes and the production of a camera ready or on line publication. Extensive use of the computer as a graphic design tool. Students will gain experience designing a newspaper, magazine, lit/art publication and Web page for their publication. S.
  
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    UNIV 205 - Student Services Leadership (3 credits)


    (Prereq: UNIV 100 ) The purpose of this course is to introduce the study of peer education, mentoring, and leadership, as it relates to student services, using text and outside readings, activities, and a variety of other assignments. This course will develop student services’ leaders on campus and improve overall peer leadership efficacy. It will give students a deeper understanding of themselves and appreciation for the diversity of others. It also serves as an opportunity to provide all student leaders with direct training and preparation for campus leadership and mentoring roles. S.
  
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    UNIV 300 - Principles of Peer Mentoring (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into Peer Mentor Program and permission of the instructor) This interactive course focuses on the study of issues, topics, and strategies related to mentoring first-year students at the University. Relevant student development theory is highlighted. This course prepares Peer Mentors to assist the instructor of FYE in a subsequent fall semester. S.
  
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    UNIV 301 - Applied Principles of Peer Mentoring (2 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of UNIV 300  and permission of the instructor) This course is designed to offer academic credit to Peer Mentors who spend eight to ten hours each week assisting the instructor in FYE, planning course content, meeting with first-year students and other course-related responsibilities determined by the Faculty Mentor or Peer Mentor Coordinator. This course specifically addresses topics and issues directly related to teaching and mentoring first year students in the success seminars. F.
  
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    UNIV 303 - Foundations of Peer Leadership in University Housing (0 to 3 credits)


    (Coreq: must be a first-semester resident adviser) This course focuses on developing leadership skills necessary to be a successful Resident Adviser. This course applies theories of development and engagement to working as a peer leader in University Housing. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 310 - Veterans Transition Seminar (3 credits)


    (Student must be a veteran) This course provides veterans with the necessary tools to make a successful transition from the armed forces to college and the transition to the civilian workforce after college. The culture of college life and the culture of the military are discussed and strategies for successful assimilation into the academic environment are presented. Members of the Veterans Success Team will assist with instruction. Classes on resume preparation, interviewing, professional dress, physical and mental health issues and career planning will be presented by the Team. F.
  
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    UNIV 315 - Service in Sustainability (3 credits)


    This course provides students with the opportunity to participate in an organized service activity that not only meets identified community needs, but also recognizes the field of sustainability. This course will integrate community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility and sustainable living and encourage lifelong civic engagement. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 320 - Writing Tutor Training (1 credit)


    (=ENGL 320 ) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) This course introduces students to both theoretical and practical concerns, issues, and questions central to the work of a writing center. As they investigate current trends in writing center scholarship, a variety of writing center models, and their own practices as tutors, students will question the practice of tutoring as they develop their own reflective stances. As it models effective center practices, this course will benefit current tutors, student hoping to tutor, students interested in education, or those considering graduate school. S.
  
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    UNIV 325 Q - Service Learning (0 to 3 credits)


    This course provides students an opportunity to participate in a supervised community service activity and reflect on how that activity has impacted their personal values and civic responsibility. In order to qualify for 3 credits, 60 hours of field activity are required. For all other cases, a minimum of 40 hours are required. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 333 - Interdisciplinary Nature of Careers (3 credits)


    (=IDS 333 ) IDS 333 /UNIV 333 will provide the student the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of operating in a consumer based economy. It will expose the student to a further understanding of the overall business environment and explore the student’s role as employee/ employer and consumer. The topics covered in the course will include a brief overview organizational, management and motivational theory, personal ethics as it applies to decision making, selecting a major and planning a career, managing change in organizations and on an individual level, innovation and creativity affecting all individuals in all organizations. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 395 Q - Internship Experience (0 credits)


    (Prereq: 2.5 minimum GPA) (Course Restrictions: Student must have completed a minimum of 30 credit hours before enrolling in course. This course cannot be used as an elective.) Requires a minimum of 150 hours of on-site supervised and evaluated student work experience. The purpose of this course is to provide a student the opportunity to confirm major selection, clarify career objective, expand networking contacts, and develop interpersonal and profession skills in a work environment. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the dean of University College) Written contract between student and instructor and approval by the dean of University College. Directed study and/or research on a specific topic. This course may be repeated once for credit. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 421 - Sustainable Development (3 credits)


    (=POLI 421 ) This class examines important questions surrounding the term “sustainable development” and its history through an analysis of the political economy, institutions, and cultural/social impacts of living in a sustainable manner and/or living unsustainably. S.
  
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    UNIV 495 Q - Internship (1 to 12 credits)


    (Course Restrictions: students must have permission of adviser, chair of major department, and dean of University College) (Prereq: students must have completed 60 credit hours before enrolling in the course) The purpose of this course is to provide a student with the opportunity to confirm major selection, clarify career objectives, expand networking contacts and develop interpersonal and professional skills in a work environment. The course may be repeated for up to 12 total credit hours. F, S, Su.

Visual and Performing Arts

  
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    VPA 103 - Topics in the Fine Arts (3 credits)


    (=VPA 103H ) This course is designed to provide the student with the basic understanding of how the arts critically influence and culturally enhance our everyday experience. Each section will present a variety of modes that are rooted in artistic expression. Topics will draw from one or more of the following disciplines: Creative Writing, Music, Theatre, and the Visual Arts. F, S, Su.
  
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    VPA 400 - Programming, Principles and Practices in Arts Enterprise Careers (3 credits)


    This course is designed for individuals who are considering an arts management career or in arts-related industries for the entrepreneurial purposes of starting one’s own nonprofit organization. This course introduces students to the industry of the arts, providing students with an overview of the careers in arts management, the work that arts managers do, and the contemporary issues and trends that affect arts management professionals. Students investigate practices of arts organizations including programming, community development, promoting the arts, and arts advocacy. Students explore how to use their own talents, passions, and interests to address problems with innovative and entrepreneurial solutions.  F, S.
  
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    VPA 422 - Grant Writing for Non-Profit Organizations (3 credits)


    (= MBA 522D) This course is designed to introduce students to the art of grant writing for professional, non-profit and arts enterprise organizations. The course explores ways to apply for and acquire funds from both public and private granting bodies, i.e. government agencies, foundations and the like. This course focuses on the importance of grant administration, stewardship, program evaluation, data analysis and the role of board and staff members in developing effective strategies for philanthropic success. This course also examines internal and external barriers that organizations face in procuring fund development. Additionally, students learn the importance of relationship building, planned giving and fundraising within a variety of enterprise careers.  F, S.
  
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    VPAE 401 - Concepts in Arts Enterprise Careers (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 130I  or MATH 139 ) This course introduces the fundamentals of business to the arts major through a combination of text, lecture, multimedia resources, projects and experiences. Business concepts are examined with a specific focus on arts-focused organizations and the best practices that enable these concepts to have a positive effect on patrons, employees, and the artistic community as a whole. This unique approach draws from the interdisciplinary field of Arts Management providing a toolkit to understand and assess management practices in artistic institutions.  F, S.

Wall Fellows Program

  
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    WFP 301 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program I (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes seminars regarding professional conduct, project management, team leadership and personal development. Tailored experiences based on the majors of studies of the course participants. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team study, projects, internships and study trips. Students will develop skills to improve their workforce readiness. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) F.
  
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    WFP 302 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program II (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes the study of leadership and professional conduct in a variety of industries and organizations, national and international. Tailored experiences based on the participants’ majors of study. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team projects, internships and an international study trip. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) S.
  
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    WFP 401 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program III (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes seminars and projects that focus on developing professional conduct and networking, project management, leading organizations and personal effectiveness. Experiences are tailored based on the participants’ majors of study. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team projects, internships and study trips. Students will develop skills to improve their workforce readiness. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) F.
  
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    WFP 402 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program IV (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes the study of leadership in a variety of industries and organizations (national and international), career planning, and professional development. Experiences are tailored based on the participants’ majors of study. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team projects, internships and a domestic study trip. Students will develop skills to improve their workforce readiness. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) S.

Women’s and Gender Studies

  
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    WGST 103 Q* - Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies (3 credits)


    Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that covers a vast range of issues. This introductory course gives an overview of the women’s movement in the U.S. and discusses its legacy in U.S. society today. It explores gender and sexuality as social constructions; special attention is given to how women and men negotiate these categories of identity on a personal-political level by looking at contemporary media and cultural productions. Readings focus especially on how gender norms influence the distribution of power and the creation of oppression. Students use feminist theory as a tool to become aware of these issues, to discuss them effectively, and to promote justice and equality in the U.S. and globally. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 105 - Introduction to LGBTQ Studies (3 credits)


    In this course, students will become familiar with disciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the experiences and self-expressions of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    WGST 302 - Special Topics in Cultural Studies (1 to 3 credits)


    This course is an interdisciplinary examination of selected themes and topics relating to race, class, and gender that shed light on the ways in which cultural meaning is generated, disseminated, ad produced through various practices, beliefs and institutions. This course may be repeated one time (for a total of six credit hours) provided it on a different topic. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 305 Q* - Gender, Sexuality, Race, and Class in Popular Culture (3 credits)


    This class gives insight into the historical foundations, theoretical concepts, political manifestations, and social issues concerning feminist interpretations of popular culture. Students explore how popular culture generates and articulates understandings of gender and sexuality and their intersections with other identity markers such as race, class, and ability. Popular culture is never simply entertainment. It provides us with the stories, images, and scripts that enable us to imagine and practice femininities, masculinities, and sexualities. These, in turn, are imbued with class and racial values and characteristics. We absorb these norms in the ads we see, the movies/television we watch, and the music we listen to. The class focuses especially on how feminist concepts and theory provide the tools to become aware of issues of discrimination and oppression in pop culture, to discuss them effectively, and to promote social justice. F, S.
  
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    WGST 310 Q - Women and Allies in Action (3 credits)


    This course explores the great variety of ways in which people who are inspired by feminist ideas have worked for social justice. Students discuss what activism is, what makes activism feminist, and how we can make sure that our activism is intersectional and sustainable. Students study the history and strategies of anti-oppression activism and create and implement an activism project themselves – either benefiting the CCU campus or the wider Horry County community.
  
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    WGST 311 - Women and Work (3 credits)


    This course will explore how identity and difference (race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and age) impact women’s historical and contemporary work experiences from the family kitchen to the corporate boardroom. Students will critically engage with a broad range of topics, including workplace inequalities, the relationship between family and work, the politics of intimate labor, the globalizations of labor, and the history of labor movements. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 315 - Special Topics in Sexuality (3 credits)


    This interdisciplinary course examines sexuality at the intersection of race, gender, and class. Topics include the history of sexuality, representations of sexuality in popular culture, sex work, reproductive justice, and/or activism. This course may be repeated once with different course topics. F, S.
  
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    WGST 318 - Women and Social Movements (3 credits)


    This class is an exploration of women’s participation in a wide variety of transnational U.S. social justice movements from the 19th to the 21st century, such as the abolition of slavery, women’s suffrage, labor rights, civil rights, LGBTQ rights, and anti-globalization. Students will examine how the ideas and practices within these movements both reflected and shaped larger social meanings and uses of race, class, gender, and sexuality. F, S.
  
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    WGST 325 Q - Civic Engagement (3 credits)


    (Prereq: WGST 103  or permission of the instructor) This course provides an opportunity for students interested in Women’s and Gender Studies issues to put their ideas about social change into action. It is designed for students to apply models of social change to various 21st-century challenges, such as: gender and racial justice, oppression, population growth, community health needs, poverty, reproductive health and climate change. As a type of service learning course, civic engagement from a gender studies perspective involves working towards equality and addressing these and other social issues from many different angles. Students will volunteer with appropriate local organizations (such as the Horry County Rape Crisis Center, Citizens Against Spouse Abuse, and local homeless shelters, among others) to address gender-based issues of the student’s choice, and host an on-campus event to raise awareness of the issue. S.
  
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    WGST 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and Course Contract approved by the WGST Director) Reading or research on a specific topic related women and/or gender studies, under the direction of a faculty member. May involve a combination of reading assignments, tutorials, papers, presentations, etc. For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations  section in this catalog. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 401 - Feminist Theories (3 credits)


    Theory provides us with the tools for interpreting and critiquing events, arguments and beliefs; when we read theory, we are forced to consider the world around us in a new way. The goal of this course is not only to critically examine the great variety of feminist theories, but also to encourage students to theorize their own understanding of the world. This course is organized around a careful investigation (and often interrogation) of key debates within Women’s and Gender Studies. Central to this course is the idea that understanding the world and understanding significant categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality are interpretive, theoretical, and political acts.  F, S.
  
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    WGST 402 - Gender and Sexuality in German and Austrian Culture (3 credits)


    (=LIS 402 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101 ) German and Austrian artists, intellectuals, and scientists have exercised enormous influence on attitudes about gender and sexuality over the course of the twentieth century and up to the present day. This class traces the development of discourses of gender and sexuality by analyzing works of fiction, non-fiction, and film in the cultural, social, and political context in which they were created. Topics to be addressed include psychoanalysis, sexology, homosexual emancipation, the women’s movement and feminism, the sexual politics of Nazi Germany, and contemporary debates surrounding multiculturalism. The course is taught in English and open to students without prior knowledge of German. To receive credit for the German minor or towards the major in Languages and Intercultural Studies, students must co-enroll in GERM 301L : German Culture Lab. F.
  
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    WGST 495 - Women’s and Gender Studies Internship (3 credits)


    The guided internship requires 120 to 140 hours of on-site work; a journal; and a final paper. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their knowledge and skills, to introduce them to local and regional employers in their field of study, and to enhance networking opportunities.
  
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    WGST 498 Q* - Capstone Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: nine hours of minor-designated courses including WGST 103 ) This class is the “capstone” to the Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) minor, an opportunity for years of coursework and skills to culminate in a substantial independent project. The bulk of the semester is spent developing, researching, and writing/executing an original paper or project that makes a singular contribution to the intellectual community of WGS. Projects are designed and crafted so that they can be used as writing samples, conference presentations, or article drafts to help students transition into the next stage as WGS scholars, activists, and professionals. This course is run workshop-style, which will ensure that students are continuously working on their projects and receive constructive feedback from the instructor and fellow classmates. F.
 

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