Oct 23, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Communication

  
  •  

    COMM 340 - Media Effects (3 credits)


    Examines uses and effects of media for individuals and societies. Covers topics such as: what media content affects people, the types of people who are affected by media content, what those effects are and how they occur, and what situations makes effects more or less likely to occur. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 341 - Advanced Public Speaking (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Analysis and advanced applications of public discourse and discursive strategies with emphasis on speech structure and delivery methods. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 345 - Communication Activism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: juniors and seniors only and successful completion of 60 credit hours) Students work with non-governmental, governmental and/or grass roots advocacy groups to engage in public service, social justice, and/or other applied communication projects, collectively referred to as Communication Activism. Utilizing a variety of communication skills—including but not limited to message design for foundational, educational, and/or preventive campaigns—students research, publicize, advocate for, and/or intervene in a social justice project with a community service organization. This is an active, intensive course that combines service learning with perspectives and practices from communication, health promotion, social science, and journalism; this course is designed for students committed to social activism. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 347 - Qualitative Inquiry in Communication (3 credits)


    Reviews the theoretical foundations, goals, and methods of qualitative inquiry in communication. A variety of qualitative methodologies and specific methods are discussed. Special attention is given to the methodological and ethical issues raised by different approaches to qualitative research in communication. F, S, M, Su.
  
  •  

    COMM 348 - Family Communication (3 credits)


    This course is designed to develop students’ understanding of and ability to analyze various aspects of communication within families. A variety of communication contexts and issues as well as family forms in contemporary society will be considered, and we will review research on several key issues pertaining to today’s families. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    COMM 350 - Interpersonal Communication Foundations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Covers basic principles of interpersonal communication, which includes–but is not limited to–communicating with friends, co-workers, fellow students, and various general publics. Discussions cover general communication theories and topics such as communication and self-concept, perceptions, language and culture, nonverbal communication, conflict management, and listening. Students work on deepening their understanding of communication and on improving their communication skills. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 367 Q* - Political Communication (3 credits)


    (=POLI 367 ) (Prereq: POLI 201  or COMM 140 ) Examines exchange of information between citizens and between citizens and their governments. Provides students knowledge to understand political communication in the scholarly community and apply skills in the creation of political communication in the public sphere. Can serve both the student who wants to go into politics and the student who wants to understand more about public opinion, the history of political communication, and how it is used in U.S. politics. Cross-listed with POLI 367. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
  •  

    COMM 373 - Organizational Media Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Examines a variety of preproduction and project management elements inherent to creating video and other media in an organizational setting. Through a series of small assignments, students complete the course with a finished proposal for an internal media project for an organization. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 374 - Organizational Communication Simulation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 274 ) Students develop and apply organizational communication skills useful in a variety of professional settings, including conducting human resource training sessions, taking and conducting employment interviews, group decision making, organizational consulting, and written/oral reporting. In a larger sense, this course is about how communication functions to create and sustain organizations. Continues the study of organizational communication began in COMM 274 , but is more application-based. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 380 - Signs Among Us: The Semiotics of Culture (3 credits)


    (=IDS 380 ) A study of the signs and sign systems produced, exchanged and interpreted in contemporary culture. From toys to cuisine, from comics to video games, from plastic to astrology, the course offers critical approaches to the multiple spheres of meaning in which we move. F, S, M, Su.
  
  •  

    COMM 390 - Storytelling Across Media (3 credits)


    This course examines strategies for effective storytelling in a variety of forms and media. Students explore the power of storytelling by producing stories with different cultural functions (e.g., to illuminate less known aspects of a given culture, to create awareness of a marginal culture, to inspire change or activism, etc.). Issues such as self-presentation, personal/communal identity, targeted audiences, societal/cultural contexts, and human agency are discussed. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
  •  

    COMM 399 - Independent Study in Communication (1 to 3 credits)


    Designed for advanced and self-motivated students, this course allows students to conduct scholarly work in an academic area not offered in the traditional course format resulting in a document, performance, or body of work that reflects the student’s research or summarizes knowledge synthesized during a structured, sequenced order of study. Students may take a maximum of six independent study credits. No two independent studies per student may be the same topic. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 410 - Special Topics in Communication (3 credits)


    An active, intensive seminar that allows students to explore, on an advanced level, a special topic within communication. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 411 - Health and the Media (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 311 ) Emphasizes media-based health messages, focusing specifically on messages depicted through television movies, news, and the internet. Focuses on health communication campaigns, as well as the application of health communication theory and strategy to campaign messages in order to maximize message effectiveness. Intended for health care consumers, or future health care, and health communication professionals. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 412 - Interpersonal Health Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 311 ) Explores the interpersonal contexts of health communication, including patient-provider communication, social support, communication through illness, family communication about health, interpersonal communication, technology, and everyday talk about health. Intended for health care consumers, or future health care and health communication professionals. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 421 - Social Media in Health Contexts (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 60 credit hours) Combines theoretical and hands-on approaches to health issues in social media. Students explore multiple social media technologies, recognize how social media can affect health and health behavior, and learn how to use social media for health promotion. Outside of class, students use social media to discuss course topics and interact with classmates. In class, students continue online discussions, and share perspectives on social media use in health contexts. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 430 - Film and Culture: Ethnographic Film (3 credits)


    Introduces ethnographic film within different cultural contexts, examined through a communication and media perspective. Explores ethnographic processes and approaches by filmmakers, and addresses challenging issues, such as ethics of representation, self-reflexivity, and the relation of time and space to culture. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
  •  

    COMM 470 - Communication and Conflict Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140  or permission of the instructor) Designed to explore conflict management, underlying causes of conflict, and available communication strategies for handling them. Introduces positive conflict management processes, including active listening, principle negotiation, mediation, and nonviolent direct action. Looks at conflict literature from a communicative perspective. Conducted in a lecture/simulation/seminar format; numerous in-class simulations allow students to experiment with conflict techniques and strategies in various conflict situations, such as friendship, business, multicultural, and experiential learning. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 491 - Communication Capstone: Thesis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 275  and COMM 276 ) Students synthesize coursework previously conducted within the major, apply their knowledge and education to a significant research topic, and produce a thesis to gain an understanding of how to compose/construct a theoretically-driven study, refine their research library skills, and understand how to use proper documentation style. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 492 Q* - Communication Capstone: Project (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 275  and COMM 276 ) Students apply their knowledge and education to a significant project involving their communication research interests. The project can be external (community) or internal (within the University). Each project is outlined in a custom course syllabus with a description of the work to be completed by the student. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
  •  

    COMM 495 Q - Communication Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140  and COMM 274  and at least 90 credit hours) The guided internship requires 120 hours of on-site work, a journal, and a final paper. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their knowledge and skills, to introduce them to local and regional employers in their field of study, and to enhance networking opportunities. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
  •  

    COMM 496 - Sports Communication Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140  and COMM 206  and at least 60 credit hours) Students receive professional experience and instruction in a substantial internship while working 10 hours per week with a sports communication organization. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. F, W, S, M, Su.

Communication, Languages and Cultures

  
  •  

    CLC 385 - Screens’: Communication Systems in Global Media (3 credits)


    (=IDS 385 ) Approaches to the properties and interaction of communication systems in the phenomenon of ‘screens’ — devices with global connectivity that are rapidly transforming interpersonal and intercultural communication. Considers the origins, elements and functions of various kinds of intermodal communication as well as their scope (possibilities and limits). Topics discussed may include principles of information theory, integrated theory of communication, the notion of interface, and aspects of the semiotics of culture. F, S, M, Su, W.

Community and Business Engagement

  
  •  

    COBE 215 Q - CoBE Consulting Practicum I (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance to the CoBE Institute and approval by Program Director) This course serves as the instructional section of the Community and Business Engagement Institute (CoBE), where CoBE Associates will meet with the CoBE Director to discuss projects, projects statuses and deadlines, and receive instruction, guidance and mentorship on defining project scopes, resolving project objectives, developing project deliverables and presenting to clients. The course is designed for freshman/sophomores CoBE Associates in the program. Students will receive additional guidance, counseling and mentorship from the CoBE Director and junior and senior CoBE Associates who have successfully passed previous sections of the CoBE Consulting Practicum. Pass/Fail grading only. This course may be repeated. F, S.
  
  •  

    COBE 415 Q - CoBE Consulting Practicum II (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance to the CoBE Institute and approval by Program Director) This course serves as the instructional section of the Community and Business Engagement Institute (CoBE), where CoBE Associates will meet with the CoBE Director to discuss projects, projects statuses and deadlines, and receive instruction, guidance and mentorship on defining project scopes, resolving project objectives, developing project deliverables and presenting to clients. The course is designed for junior/senior CoBE Associates in the program. In addition to successfully completing course objectives, students will serve in a leadership role, providing additional guidance, counseling and mentorship to new CoBE Associates and occasionally assume the responsibility of team leader. Pass/Fail grading only. This course may be repeated. F, S.

Computing Sciences

  
  •  

    CSCI 101 - Introduction to the Internet and World Wide Web (3 credits)


    This course will incorporate critical thinking as students learn about the Internet and the World Wide Web. Topics include the internet interface, Web 2.0, basics of networking, introduction to HTML and Web page development, locating information on the WWW, social networking, privacy and digital security. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 105 - Introduction to Computer Applications (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) A survey course that includes an emphasis on scientific data research, presentation, organization and analysis through web development, presentation software, and spreadsheets. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 106 - Advanced Computer Applications (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) (Prereq: CSCI 105  or permission of the instructor) Advanced computer applications with emphasis on integrating and linking user software applications. This course also includes online collaboration skills, advanced e-mail concepts and internet. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 110 - Enterprise Business Applications (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Business or Computer Science majors, or permission of the instructor) A survey course designed for Business or Computer Science majors. The course focuses on business applications involving beginning and intermediate spreadsheets and presentation software. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 111 - Programming in BASIC (Computer Usage) (3 credits)


    Computer programming in the BASIC language. F, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 120 - Introduction to Web Interface Development (3 credits)


    An introduction to the design and development of interactive Web 2.0 user interfaces using client-side programming languages. Topics include layout and design for multiple screen sizes, form creation and validation, client-side DOM manipulation, coding frameworks, and interaction design best practices. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 130 - Introduction to Computer Science (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) Designed as a communication intensive introduction to Computer Science; provides a comprehensive overview of the field of Computer Science in areas such as machine architecture, data storage, data manipulation, operating systems, algorithms, programming languages, data structures, database structures, computational complexity, and artificial intelligence; includes a brief introduction to programming. Students will demonstrate mastery of the course materials through both written and oral assignments appropriate to a Communication Intensive course. (Communication Intensive Core Course) F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 131L - Algorithmic Thinking (1 credit)


    An introduction to algorithmic thinking, problem solving, and computing environments. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 135 - Introduction to Programming (3 credits)


    (Students are required to have a personal notebook computer for this course) This course provides an introduction to computer programming using a dynamically typed language. Topics include algorithm development, input/output, conditional statements, loops, functions, and use of basic data structures. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 140 - Introduction to Algorithmic Design I (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) (Students are required to have a personal notebook computer for this course) (Prereq: MATH 130 , MATH 130I , MATH 131 , MATH 132 , MATH 135 , MATH 160  or MATH 161 ; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or a placement score of MATH 132, MATH 135, MATH 160)  (Coreq: CSCI 140L ) An introduction to problem solving and algorithmic design methodology using a high-level programming language. Topics include problem solving techniques; subprograms and modularity; fundamental data types and structures; flow of control statements; and file input/output. Three lecture hours per week. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 140L - Introduction to Algorithmic Design I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq:  MATH 130 , MATH 130I , MATH 131 , MATH 132 , MATH 135 , MATH 160 , or MATH 161 ; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or a placement test score of MATH 132, MATH 135, MATH 160) (Coreq: CSCI 140 ) Laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 145 - Intermediate Programming (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 135  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or CSCI 140 /CSCI 140L , both with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Students are required to have a personal notebook computer for this course) This course continues the study of programming in a dynamically typed language. Topics include object-oriented development, user-defined data types, debugging, testing, and elementary distributed computing. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 150 - Introduction to Algorithmic Design II (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) (Prereq: CSCI 140 /CSCI 140L  AND the choice of MATH 130 , MATH 130I , MATH 131 , MATH 132 , MATH 135 , MATH 160 , or MATH 161 ; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: CSCI 150L ) (Students are required to have a personal notebook computer for this course) A continuation of CSCI 140 . Continued development of discipline in program design, style and expression, debugging and testing. Topics include object oriented programming and algorithm design; elementary data structures; user-defined data types, inheritance, and encapsulation. F, S, Su.
  
  
  •  

    CSCI 170 - Ethics in Computer Science (1 credit)


    Provides real-world experiences that stimulate discussion of ethical issues in the technical work place. Topics include: ACM Code of Ethics, general moral responsibilities, privacy security, copyright and ownership agreements, computer crimes, and personal ethics. Class format presents case studies of current news events regarding computer ethics. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 207 - Programming in C++ (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Computer programming in the C ++ language. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 208 - Programming in Visual Basic (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) An introduction to programming with Visual Basic including Windows interface controls, Active X controls, and database access using Active X objects. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 209 - Programming in Java (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Students will learn to program in the Java programming language. Topics include inheritance, threads, graphics, network programming, and Web-programming. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 210 - Computer Organization and Programming (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 140 /CSCI 140L  and MATH 174 ) Logical basis of computer structure, machine representation of information, flow of control, instruction codes, arithmetic and logical operations, indexing, indirect addressing, input-output, sub-routines, linkages, macros. Interpretive and assembly systems, and pushdown stacks. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 211 - Computer Infrastructure (3 credits)


    This course covers core computer hardware, including the relationships between components of a computer system. Software components are also introduced, including the fundamentals of the computer operating system and an introduction to virtualization systems.
  
  •  

    CSCI 216 - Linux Fundamentals I (3 credits)


    This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of how to use a Linux operating system. Topics include accessing the command line, file manipulation, managing users and groups, file system permissions, controlling services, managing processes, configuring networking, and using package managers.  F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 220 - Data Structures (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  and MATH 174 ) A continuation of CSCI 150  and CSCI 150L , topics include analysis of algorithms, with emphasis on computational complexity and advanced algorithms including self-adjusting trees, hashing, graphs, sorting, searching, hashing methods, and greedy algorithms. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 225 - Introduction to Relational Database and SQL (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 135  or CSCI 140 /CSCI 140L ) This course will provide an introduction to relational database concepts and the design of relational databases. It will also provide a thorough introduction to SQL. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 255 - Topics in Web Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in both CSCI 120  and CSCI 135  or permission of the instructor) This course focuses on the use of middleware (PHP) for development of dynamic web application development. The primary focus is on web-based database management system interaction for data collection, data management and data retrieval. The course also provides an introduction to ecommerce. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 270 - Data Communication Systems and Networks (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 210  or CSCI 211 ) Fundamentals of data communications, including hardware, basic components of communications, configurations, networks and applications, protocols, and software are discussed. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 280 - Strategies in Problem Solving (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) The focus of this course is on practical problem solving in both individual and team settings. A variety of problems that require different types of solutions and algorithms will be presented, as well as problems to be solved. Students will also develop programming and teamwork techniques in a competition setting while gaining proficiency in applying a systematic approach to problem solving. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 303 - Introduction to Server-side Web Application Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 135  or CSCI 140 /CSCI 140L ; CSCI 120 ; and CSCI 225 ; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A thorough introduction to development and deployment of web-based applications. Topics include middleware programming concepts, client server architecture, database access, state management, and application security. Students are expected to already have proficiency with introductory computer programming, HTML, CSS, Javascript, and SQL or other database query framework. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 310 - Introduction to Computer Architecture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 150 , CSCI 210 , and MATH 174 ) An introduction to the fundamental aspects of a computer system’s structure and behavior; binary arithmetic, combinational logic, circuit design, instruction sets, register operations and flip-flops, control system functions, memories, interrupt structures, processors, and performance measures will be covered. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 311 - System Architecture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 211  and CSCI 216 ) Introduction to the high-level architecture of computer systems and the hardware-software interface. Major design features of hardware components are discussed. Topics include instruction set architectures, processor designs, memory components, power, storage devices, device drivers, kernels, bootloaders, firmware, and partition tables. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 316 - Linux Fundamentals II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 216 ) A continuation of Linux Fundamentals I. Topics covered include file systems, disk partitioning, accessing network storage, SELinux, scheduled tasks, firewalls, and troubleshooting. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 330 - Systems Analysis & Software Engineering (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A thorough introduction to requirements management, and best practices in eliciting, documenting, and verifying requirements for programming systems. Topics include writing effective use cases, constructing UML-compliant models (including class, state, and activity diagrams), specification of user interface and data layers, testing, and integration. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 335 - Project Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 12 credit hours of CSCI courses numbered 120 or above, all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course will cover techniques in project management based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge from the Project Management Institute. F, S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 343 - Introduction to Mobile Application Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Course presents a thorough introduction to the design and development of applications for mobile devices. Topics include Navigation, Notifications, Graphics, User Interface Design, User Interface Development, Storage, Messaging, and Testing. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 350 - Organization of Programming Languages (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Formal language concepts, statement types, control structures, compilation vs. interpretation, list processing and string manipulation languages. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 356 - Operating Systems (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Basic concepts and terminology of operating systems, I/0 and interrupt structures, system structures, processor scheduling, processes and process synchronization, deadlocks, memory management, and other concepts. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 360 - Numerical Calculus (3 credits)


    (Prereq or Coreq: MATH 260  and a working knowledge of programming language) Introduction to numerical methods, interpolation, quadrature, solution of linear and nonlinear systems or equations, error analysis. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 365 - Internet Marketing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 303 ) This course focuses on advanced topics in web development including SEO (Search Engine Optimization), web analytics, social media and internet marketing. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 375 - Introduction to Multimedia Applications (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 120  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Concepts of multimedia applications are introduced with a focus on multimedia representation, processing, storage, and implementation. Topic areas include audio, image, video, animation, compression technologies, and standards. Tools and techniques for appropriate design and implementation of multimedia applications will be explored. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 380 - Introduction to the Analysis of Algorithms (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220  and MATH 160  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) An introductory course in the analysis of algorithms, with emphasis on computational complexity including practical applications and the analysis of specific problems and algorithms, course investigates most commonly used algorithm design techniques and also introduces the notion of “hard” problems and approximate solutions. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 385 - Introduction to Information Systems Security (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 12 credit hours of CSCI courses numbered 120 or above, all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Comprehensive survey of security policies, models and mechanisms for confidentiality, integrity, management and legal and ethical issues. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 390 - Theory of Computation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) General models of computation, formal languages and automa theory and algorithmic unsolvability. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and approved contract) Directed study and/or research on specific topics. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 400 - Senior Assessment (0 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior status and permission of the instructor) This course provides various resources to graduating seniors including strategies for job searching and/or entry to graduate school. Students will complete all final assessments required to maintain currency and quality of the program. It is intended for majors to take in their last semester prior to graduation. Pass/Fail grading only. Grading is S or U.
  
  •  

    CSCI 407 - Coding Theory (3 credits)


    (=MATH 407 ) This course covers the issues involved in designing efficient codes, including error detection/correction. Topics to be covered include distance, nearest neighbor decoding, hamming codes and linear codes. Other topics which may be covered are Golay codes, Reed-Muller codes, cyclic codes, and spherical codes.
  
  •  

    CSCI 408 - Cryptography (3 credits)


    (=MATH 408 ) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of cryptography and cryptanalysis, primarily focusing on data encryption and decryption. Topics will include: modular arithmetic, classical encryption schemes, modern encryption schemes, password security, and digital signatures, secret sharing.
  
  •  

    CSCI 409 - Advanced Web Application Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 225  and CSCI 303  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Advanced topics in the development and deployment of web-based applications. Topics include advanced middleware programming concepts and development of dynamic websites. Students will write a full-scale web application as their final project. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 414 - Introduction to Web Engineering (3 credits)


    This course covers topics necessary for the development of database-driven information systems on the internet. Topics and technologies covered include a practical introduction to XHTML, Cascading StyleSheets, JavaScript, PHP, theory and design of relational database management systems, search engine optimization, social network marketing and website analytics. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 415 - Windows System Administration (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 211 ) Topics in systems administration include application server management, deployment of websites, domain name service, web services, security, backup and recovery, and e-mail management. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 416 - Linux System Administration (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 211 , CSCI 310 , or CSCI 356 ) This course provides an introduction to Linux system administration, including open-source software applications. Topics include managing software installations, configuring hardware drivers, implementing authentication and authorization systems, automating management tasks, and configuring services. Students will gain hands-on experience managing actual Linux systems. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 418 Q - Financial Technology (3 credits)


    This course will provide an introduction to financial concepts and algorithms. Students will develop online applications to gather real-time data and use financial algorithms for pricing and monitoring of financial products. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 425 - Database Systems Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 225 ) An exploration of advanced database topics will be covered. Topics may include the efficiency of advanced queries, indexing structures, database and SQL optimizations, backup and recovery, NoSQL and big data concepts. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 427 - Systems Integration (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 270 ) Introduction to, and practice of, designing and integrating large-scale information processing systems, with a focus on selecting and implementing hardware and software systems to develop an appropriate IT solution. Topics include systems provisioning, software integration, hardware management, availability, scalability, and disaster recovery capability. Students will design an integrated information system to implement a solution to a case study problem. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 434 - Digital Forensics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: junior standing) This course introduces students to the collection, preservation, presentation and preparation of computer based evidence for the purposes of criminal law enforcement or civil litigation. These activities define the central roles of computer forensic practitioners involved in investigating computer crime scenes and torts involving computers. Students will be prepared to assist in the formulation and implementation of organizational computer forensics preparedness policies, to determine the necessity for forensic procedures, extend governance processes to allow for proper future forensic investigations, and to be contributing members of computer forensics investigation teams. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 440 - Introduction to Computer Graphics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 220 ) An overview of the elements of 2D and 3D graphics, includes topics on raster graphics, geometrical transformations, parallel and perspective projections for 3D viewing, interaction techniques, representation of curves and surfaces, solid modeling and topics on visual realism. F or S as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 444 - Human Computer Interaction (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 12 credit hours of CSCI courses numbered 120 or above, all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A large percentage of the world’s software is devoted to the interface between computers and their users, and usability is one of the key factors deciding whether a software project succeeds or fails. This course explores the requirements analysis, design and evaluation of the User Interface in the context of Software Engineering Processes. Specific methods and design problems will be illustrated with real world examples in information technology, the internet, communications, mobility, multimedia and speech technologies. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 445 Q* - Image Processing and Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 150 /CSCI 150L  and MATH 160 , or MATH 242 /MATH 242L ) This course introduces the theoretical foundations and methodologies of digital image processing and analysis. Topics include intensity transformations, contrast enhancement, filtering in the spatial and frequency domains, restoration and reconstruction, edge detection, feature extraction, morphological operations, image segmentation, object recognition, and color image processing. F or S, as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 450 - Principles of Compiler Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 210  and CSCI 350  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Introduction to programming language structure, lexical analysis, syntax analysis, code generations, error repair, and optimization. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 455 - Data Science and Analytics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 12 credit hours of CSCI courses 120 or above, all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course deals with the data science and analytics for information systems and technology applications. This course also introduces data management process for data science and analytics. How the data relate and aggregate in analytic databases and how they are used by analytical tools will be explored through case studies and projects. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 460 - Algorithms in Bioinformatics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior level status or permission of the instructor) (Coreq: basic knowledge of Linear Algebra in Calculus. Solid background in Programming, Data Structures, and design of Algorithms.) Introduction to the main algorithms used in Data Mining of Genomic sequences and evaluation of gene expression data from Micro Arrays. Topics include Dynamic programming, Hidden Markov Models, Support Vector Machines, Clustering algorithms, and Singular Valve Decomposition. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 466 - Informatics and Knowledge Discovery (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 220  and MATH 160 ) Students will explore the basic techniques of data mining and data stream mining and then apply them on real world datasets taken from different domain experts. This class will teach students how to obtain patterns, trends, and behavior from different datasets to enable domain experts to discover new knowledge without the need to conduct expensive experiments or complex modeling procedures.
  
  •  

    CSCI 473 - Introduction to Parallel Systems (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220 , CSCI 356 , and MATH 160 ; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course introduces parallel computer architectures and their programming. It includes an introduction to MPI and OpenMP and a number of engineering problems, including numerical simulations. It also provides an Introduction to performance evaluation and modeling as well as scalability analysis. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 475 - Decision Support Systems (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 225  and CSCI 330  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A study of decision support systems. Topics include computerized decision support and business intelligence systems, modeling, and methodologies. Course will cover data and web mining concepts, knowledge management technologies, collaboration techniques, and intelligent systems. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    CSCI 480 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220 ) Covers the fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence (AI); topics and techniques for analyzing and developing intelligent systems; programming in an AI language. Coverage may include applications in areas such as expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy logic, robotics, etc. F, even years.
  
  •  

    CSCI 484 - Machine Learning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 220  and MATH 160 , or MATH 242 /MATH 242L ) This course provides an introduction to pattern recognition and machine learning. Topics may include probabilistic learning, linear discriminants, neural networks, unsupervised learning, decision trees, Bayesian networks, support vector machines, and reinforcement learning.
  
  •  

    CSCI 485 - Introduction to Robotics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220 ) An introduction to the fundamentals of mobile robotics including robot hardware, sensors, obstacle avoidance, navigation, mapping, path planning and robot architectures. F, odd years.
  
  •  

    CSCI 490 - Software Engineering II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 330  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course is a continuation of the software engineering design principles introduced in CSCI 330 . Topics include project requirements, design specifications, testing, project management and group dynamics. Student will design, code, test and implement an information system as part of a team project. F.
  
  •  

    CSCI 495 - Information Systems Capstone Course and Project (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 225  and CSCI 330 ) This senior capstone course integrates and synthesizes the material covered in the field of Information Systems, including Systems Analysis, Project Management, System Development and Deployment, and Security. Students will develop a practical solution to an information systems problem. Presentation will be both oral and written. Lecture topics may vary from semester to semester. S.
  
  •  

    CSCI 497 - Computer Science Internship (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Junior standing or higher, minimium overall GPA of 2.5, and one of the following courses with a grade of ‘C’ or better: CSCI 220 , CSCI 330 , CSCI 415 , or CSCI 416 ) Supervised work experience of at least 150 hours. Program format is approved by the area director. A written final paper is required. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 498 - Cooperative Education (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI major with at least sophomore level status) Cooperative full-time work study arrangement among the University, the business or industry and the student. Arrangements are made in consultation with the department chair. This course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    CSCI 499 - Topics in Computer Science (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Special projects and recent developments in Computer Science selected to meet current faculty and student interest. Offered as needed.

Criminal Justice

  
  •  

    CRMJ 421 - The Judicial Process (3 credits)


    A study of the growth of law, the law-making function of the courts, the structure and organization of federal and state courts, the procedures involved in civil and criminal cases, and the problems and proposals for reform in the administration of justice.

Digital Culture and Design

  
  •  

    DCD 100 - Technology and Humanity (3 credits)


    Technologies play a central role in our culture, in the decisions we make, in our social relationships, in our health, in our safety, in conflict resolution, in the careers we pursue, in the way we work, play, and live. Given this, part of what it means to be human is to be a user of technology. Gaining a clearer and more well-articulated understanding of the moral and social-political implications of technologies thus allows for a more considered view of our place in the world and our progress as a human civilization (scientifically, ethically, and socially). The course considers technologies from different human perspectives. F, S.
  
  •  

    DCD 101 - Humanities in the Digital Age (3 credits)


    The first half of this course provides a critical overview of methods, tools, and projects in the Digital Humanities; the second half of the course is devoted to a very basic introduction to building and using such tools in digital humanities projects. Students will leave the course with both a practical introduction to computational methods and a critical lens for understanding the impact of new media and digital tools on humanities inquiry and the liberal arts. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    DCD 102 - Information Design (3 credits)


    An introductory course that provides students with an overview of the concepts and methods of information design, the process of presenting information in a clear and effective way. This course focuses on information design in the humanities, and covers topics ranging from an introduction to the basic principles of visual information representation to hands-on applications of those concepts in creating digital documents. Students will explore a wide variety of free and professional software applications used in information design, including online mapping applications such as Google Maps and ArcGIS Online, infographics applications such as Piktochart, and interactive presentation applications such as Prezi. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    DCD 200 - Introduction to Digital Humanities (3 credits)


    An introductory course that provides students with a broad overview of the history, concepts, and methods of computing in the humanities. This course focuses not only on how use of computer technology has evolved in humanities disciplines and humanities-centered interdisciplinary research, but also explores basic methods and techniques in digital humanities through the examination of existing projects and hands-on exercises that allow students to build practical skill sets. F, S, Su.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 22