Dec 02, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

German

  
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    GERM 398 - Selected Topics in Translation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the department) Selected topics in German literature and culture. Readings in English; topics announced in advance. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    GERM 399 - Independent Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A written contract between the student and the instructor for a special topic dealing with German language or culture, and approved by the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts) May not be used to satisfy the German Minor Core. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    GERM 400 - German Civilization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or equivalent; permission of the department) A broad survey of German civilization and cultural history from the Germanic origins through the Third Reich/World War II.
  
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    GERM 401 - Contemporary Germany (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or equivalent; permission of the department) An in-depth examination of the civilization and cultural life of post-war Germany with additional consideration of Austria and Switzerland.
  
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    GERM 405 - Topics in German (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or equivalent; permission of the department) Reading and discussion on selected topics in German language, literature, and culture. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    GERM 415 - German Linguistics and Phonology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or equivalent; permission of the department) An overview of the history of the German language and introduction to German phonology, with an emphasis on teaching applications.
  
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    GERM 448 - Teaching of German (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the department) Study of the latest methodologies, theories, and materials for teaching modern languages.
  
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    GERM 495 - Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 350  or special permission) This is a guided internship and requires 120 hours of outside work, a journal, and a final evaluation paper. Students must have permission of the department chair before applying for internship. Application for the internship can be obtained without receiving permission from the department chair. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course’s objective, requirements, and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties - the student faculty supervisor, chair of the department, and the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization by the coordinator of internships.

Health Administration

  
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    BSHA 305 - Health Care Marketing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 350 ) This course is an introduction to the principles and practices associated with marketing in a health care setting. The course will cover the major topics surrounding health care marketing in the current dynamic health care environment. Topics will include, but not be limited to, developing a market orientation; organizing a marketing operation; consumer behavior; market research; market segmentation; elements of a marketing plan; development of a marketing plan. F, S, Su.
  
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    BSHA 340 - Health Law and Compliance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Junior standing) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the legal and ethical issues impacting the administration and delivery of health care services. This course provides students with the practical knowledge needed to identify legal issues inherent in health care administration and to understand the legal ramifications of administrative and management decisions. Specific course topics may include: sources of law, the court system and legal procedures, professional and institutional liability, governmental regulatory methods, antitrust law, corporate compliance programs, emergency care, issues concerning informed consent, credentialing of medical professionals, confidentiality of health information, termination of care, and health care reform, as well as the external, organizational and personal influences on ethics.  F, S.
  
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    BSHA 380 - Human Resource Management in Health Care (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PUBH 380 ) This course will introduce students to the various personnel functions in health services organizations, including recruitment, selection, job analysis, performance appraisal, compensation/ benefits, employee health, grievance, discipline, discharge and organizational development. In addition, students will gain an understanding of current social, behavioral, legal and ethical issues from a human resources planning and management perspective in health care. F, S, Su.
  
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    BSHA 382 - Budgeting and Finance in Health Care (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 201 ) Students will study accounting and financial management principles and their application to operational problems in health care. In addition, students will study budgeting and gain skills in developing budgets in different healthcare units. Students will gain competence in the techniques of forecasting financial results for individual projects and the organization. In addition, major reimbursement systems will be covered, such as Medicare, Medicaid, and third-party payment systems. F, S, Su.
  
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    BSHA 398 - Special Topics in Health Administration (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) This course is designed as a seminar that will focus on a specialty area of Health Administration. Examples may be: Medical Informatics, Medical Insurance and Quality Improvement. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics. F, S, Su.
  
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    BSHA 399 - Independent Study in Health Administration (2 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Students may select a special topic in health care administration that they wish to learn more about. The faculty member most qualified will direct the independent study with the individual student. The student and the faculty member will jointly write the course objectives and the student learning outcomes for the course. A plan of study will be developed jointly and the method of evaluation will be determined by the faculty. Independent studies may be taken more than once as the topic changes. F, S, Su.
  
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    BSHA 420 - Health Care Policy and Management (3 credits)


    Course Restriction(s): Junior Standing. (Restricted to junior standing) This course will provide an overview of health care policy issues from a clinical perspective. It will illuminate America’s health care system with regard to payment and access to care, reimbursement to care providers, organization of health delivery systems, the health care workforce and education of health professionals, long-term care and medical ethics of rationing care, mechanisms for controlling costs, and the measurement of care quality. In addition, health care reform and the conflict and change in America’s health care system will be examined in relation to the continuum of health care systems of four international nations. S.
  
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    BSHA 449 - Leadership and Organizational Change in Health Care (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 301 ) This course is designed to prepare students to assume leadership roles in a changing health care environment. It examines the change process and the impact of leadership, organizational structure, and organizational culture on change. Through assessments and interactive experiences, students gain insight into their own leadership and change management skills. They also design leadership development and change management plans. F.
  
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    BSHA 455 - Managing Health Information (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Statistics) This course is an introduction to health information management from the perspective of control and management of information resources. It includes strategic information systems planning, integration and maintenance of organizational information technologies and coordination of policies and procedure for technology acquisition implementation and operations. This course is also designed to develop skills in problem identification, assessment of needs, and evaluation of objectives. Emphasis is on collection, organization, and evaluation of health care programs. F, S, Su.
  
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    BSHA 456 - Health Data Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: BSHA 455  and Statistics) This course is designed to give students experience in analyzing and completing health information projects including; data design and collection, clinical performance measurement, data presentation, and reading and understanding professional statistical publications. Qualitative and quantitative data analysis and inferential analysis are included in class activities. F, S, Su.
  
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    BSHA 457 - Health Data Analytics and Visualization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Junior standing) Managing health care data has the potential to reduce costs, enhance quality, and improve population health. Health data analytics and visualization is an important component of understanding health outcomes. This course facilitates knowledge and skills needed to analyze health data and, more importantly, draw conclusions from the analysis. This course does not use advanced mathematics to solve problems but instead relies on computer technology, especially graphs, histograms, pie charts, and mapping visualization to examine and understand data more intuitively and visually.  F, S.

History

  
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    HIST 101 - The Foundations of European Civilization to 1648 (3 credits)


    An introduction to the foundations of European Civilization, beginning with the early civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia, followed by a survey of the history of ancient Greece and Rome, the rise of Christianity, the transmission of this heritage to Europe, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Reformation.
  
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    HIST 102 - Introduction to European Civilization from 1648 to the Present (3 credits)


    A survey of the rise of European civilization from the end of the Thirty Years’ War to the present.
  
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    HIST 105 Q* - Pre-Modern World (3 credits)


    This course explores historical interpretations of pre-modern human experiences. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 106 Q* - Modern World (3 credits)


    This course explores historical interpretations of modern human experiences. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 111 - World History to 1500 (3 credits)


    World History to 1500 examining the emergence of key civilization in India, China, Africa and Europe.
  
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    HIST 112 - World History Since 1500 (3 credits)


    World History since 1500 examines the nature and interactions between Europeans, Asians, Africans, Pacific Islanders and Americans from the “voyages of oceanic discovery” through the ages of democratic and industrial revolutions and into the era of contemporary global developments.
  
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    HIST 125 - The Middle East Since 610 CE (3 credits)


    This course will expose students to the major events, leaders, civilizations and themes in the history of the Middle East between the 7th and 21st centuries. It will cover such topics as the origins of Islam, the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the rise of nationalism, the World Wars, the struggles for independence, political and cultural developments, and the armed conflicts of the late 20th century. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 126 - Modern East Asia (3 credits)


    This course examines the historical foundations of the social, political, and cultural evolution of China, Korea, and Japan with a focus on the 19th and early 20th century experience. F, S.
  
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    HIST 152 - War & Society in the Modern Era (3 credits)


    This course will explore how war and warfare have shaped the world since 1500. Topics will include the development of political and martial strategies, both state and sub-state; technological and operational innovations; social and cultural consequences; commemoration and memory. Possible examples can include the Napoleonic Wars, the U.S. Civil War, colonial wars, the Sino-Japanese War(s), world wars, the Cold War, resistance movements, guerrillas, insurgents, and militias. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    HIST 200 - Introduction to Southern Studies (3 credits)


    This survey course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the idea of southern identity by specifically investigating the history of the geographic region. We may explore the South as a way of life, investigating the cultural practices and traditions that have given the region its distinctive identity. We will ask: “what is the South,” “where is the South,” and “who are Southerners” looking at how these identities and realities have evolved over time. This course introduces students to the craft and concepts involved in interdisciplinary knowledge production, and will serve as an introductory course to the Southern Studies minor. Students will be exposed to materials used in a multitude of disciplines and will be asked to evaluate and interpret such documents as historical primary sources, memoirs, literary works, films, photographs, artifacts, music, and art. F.
  
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    HIST 201 - History of the United States from Discovery to the Present: Discovery through Reconstruction (3 credits)


    A general survey of the United States from the era of discovery to the present, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments. HIST 201: Discovery through Reconstruction. HIST 202 : Reconstruction to the Present.
  
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    HIST 202 - History of the United States from Discovery to the Present: Reconstruction to the Present (3 credits)


    A general survey of the United States from the era of discovery to the present, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments. HIST 201 : Discovery through Reconstruction. HIST 202: Reconstruction to the Present.
  
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    HIST 205 - U.S. History (3 credits)


    This course explores the historical development of connections between individuals, societies and cultures in the Americas. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 250 - Historical Research and Writing (3 credits)


    A course designed to teach both written and oral communication in history. Topics include compiling a scholarly bibliography on a historical topic, interpreting primary and secondary sources, developing a clear thesis, ensuring academic integrity, using Chicago-style documentation, and presenting work in a scholarly fashion. A minimum of twelve pages of graded, written work, with substantial opportunities for revision, and at least one graded oral presentation required. Topics chosen by the Professor. For History majors, HIST 250 is a corequisite or prerequisite for all upper-level courses.
  
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    HIST 255 Q* - Great Debates (3 credits)


    This course explores the elements of historical thinking, analysis, and argumentation. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 289 Q* - Exploring Careers in History (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to various fields of historical work and potential career opportunities in history through a possible combination of readings, discussions, field trips, invited speakers and hands-on projects. It assists students in understanding the job market, including beneficial internships, and trains students in the skills necessary to navigate that job market. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 300 - Historical Methods (3 credits)


    A seminar in the principles and practice of historical research, including an introduction to historiography, the interpretation of historical documents, proper documentation, and clarity of expression. Should be among the first upper-level courses taken by majors.
  
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    HIST 302 - The Middle Ages (500-1250) (3 credits)


    A study of the causes and course of the split of the Roman world into Western European, Eastern Orthodox and Islamic culture, followed by a discussion of the civilization of the High Middle Ages and the problems of cultural change in the late medieval period.
  
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    HIST 306 - The French Revolution (3 credits)


    A critical examination of the French Revolution’s origins, development and immediate consequences. F, W, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 307 - European History (1848-1914) (3 credits)


    A study of the main currents of European thought, from the Revolutions of 1848 to the rise of industrial power, imperialism, diplomatic realignment, nationalism, and the road to World War I.
  
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    HIST 308 - Interwar Europe (3 credits)


    An inquiry into major developments in European history, society, and culture between 1914 and 1939. F, S.
  
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    HIST 309 - World War II and the Cold War (3 credits)


    An inquiry into the conduct of the Second World War and the problems of planning and implementing the peace; origins and the development of the Cold War; the demise of colonialism and the integration of Europe; the rise of the superpowers.
  
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    HIST 310 - History of Berlin: Landscape and Memory (3 credits)


    This course examines both the dynamic transformation of Berlin’s growth and the historical memories embedded in its urban landscapes. We may focus as well on how civic and national officials have worked to preserve the past in the city as a way for Germans to work through the legacies of the modern era.
  
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    HIST 312 - Patterns in World History (3 credits)


    This course examines how people, political regimes and mobile capital created the modern world. Students will study the interactions between Europeans, Asians, Africans, Pacific Islanders and Americans from early-modern oceanic voyages through the ages of revolution, modernization, nationalism, and decolonization.
  
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    HIST 314 - The History of Modern Russia and the Soviet Union Since 1855 (3 credits)


    The decline of Imperial Russia, the Revolution of 1917, and the development of the Soviet Union.
  
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    HIST 322 - Medieval Art & Architecture (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 322 ) A survey of the cultural and artistic trends from c. 300 to 1300, this course will focus on France, England, Germany, and Italy, but also examine important post-classical innovations in what are now Norway, Greece, Turkey, Israel, Egypt, and Syria. Much of the discussion will concern religious architecture, culminating in High Gothic cathedrals. Decorative arts such as illuminated manuscripts, mosaics, stained glass, and sculpture in wood, stone, bronze, and gold will also be central to the course content.
  
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    HIST 323 - Italian Renaissance Art & Architecture (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 323 ) This course surveys the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Italian peninsula c. 1300-1550 and the revival of classical ideals and philosophies of visual representation focusing primarily on Florence, Venice, and Rome. The course examines the art and ideas of inspired, creative minds such as Giotto, Masaccio, Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Palladio, and many more.
  
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    HIST 326 - History of Germany Since 1870 (3 credits)


    A critical study of the creation of the German Empire, Bismarck, Wilhelmian Germany, the First World War, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the Second World War, and the fate of German speaking peoples since then.
  
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    HIST 328 - Renaissance Europe, 1250-1517 (3 credits)


    A survey of Renaissance culture as it emerged in the northern Italian city-states. Topics include republican and despotic governments, war and diplomacy, humanism, art, individualism, religion, the growth of secularism, gender, the family, and the Northern Renaissance.
  
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    HIST 329 - Reformation Europe, 1517-1648 (3 credits)


    An examination of the Protestant Reformation and its European context. Topics include the Renaissance background, Luther’s break with Rome, the major reformed traditions, the Catholic response, the nation-state, warfare and diplomacy, colonialism, the new science, and the rise of toleration and individualism.
  
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    HIST 330 - Enlightenment: Europe (1648-1789) (3 credits)


    A survey of the main currents of European thought, cultural development, and politics between the Thirty Years’ War and the French Revolution.
  
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    HIST 331 Q* - Medieval Islamic World, c. 600-1258 (3 credits)


    This course explores the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural aspects surrounding the rise of the Islamic Empire through the reign of the Abbasid Caliphate, situating the early Islamic traditions within their proper historical contexts, including the political, economic, and social structures ranging from central Asia to modern day Spain from c. 600 to 1250 CE. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 332 Q* - Age of Alexander and The Roman Republic (3 credits)


    This course may examine the political, social, religious, economic, intellectual, and military developments of the Hellenistic Mediterranean, c. 350-30 BCE. Topics of focus will include the Classical Greek legacy, the conquests of Alexander the Great, the spread of Greek civilization throughout the Mediterranean, and the development of the Roman Republic through the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE.
  
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    HIST 333 - Modern France: 1715 to the Present (3 credits)


    A political and social history of the French nation from the end of Louis XIV’s reign, and the Revolutions of 1789 and 1792, to modern-day France.
  
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    HIST 334 - Paris as Text and Context (3 credits)


    This course examines themes and topics concerning the history of Paris from 1600 to the present.
  
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    HIST 335 - History of England: 1485-1714 (3 credits)


    The development of Modern England from the beginning of the Tudor dynasty, through the Elizabethan period, the Civil War, Cromwell, to the end of the Stuart line.
  
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    HIST 336 - Ancien Regime and French Revolution (3 credits)


    This course provides an overview of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of France from the late seventeenth century through the French Revolution
  
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    HIST 338 - War and Memory (3 credits)


    An interdisciplinary examination of the individual, collective, and institutional struggles associated with the history, trauma, memory, and legacy of war. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics no more than four times. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 339 - The Great War (3 credits)


    An interdisciplinary examination of the conflicts of 1914-1918, which may emphasize private memoirs, combat narratives, professional histories, public forms of remembrance, and representations of violence. F, S.
  
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    HIST 340 - Topics in East Asian History (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to selected subjects in East Asian History. Topics may include the early Chinese imperium; feudal rule; commercial and social conditions; arrival of Western imperialists; and the rise of anti-imperialist, nationalist, and de-colonization movements. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. Offered as needed.
  
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    HIST 341 Q* - History of Modern Korea (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to the major, political, social, intellectual, and economic developments in Korean history from the 18th Century to the present. Of primary interest will be the transformation of traditional Korea into a Japanese colony and eventually a divided nation. F, S.
  
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    HIST 344 - Conflict and Society (3 credits)


    This course examines significant conflicts in historical context by addressing the social and cultural effects of conflict upon the societies that experience them as well as the ways that societies and cultures shape the conflicts they wage. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 345 - Intellectual History of Early Modern Europe (3 credits)


    “Great books” from the High Middle Ages to the Romantic era, set within the broader social, economic, and political context. Topics include scholasticism, humanism, Renaissance Platonism, Reformation and Counter-Reformation theology, skepticism, the new science, British empiricism, the Enlightenment, and the Romantic reaction.
  
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    HIST 347 - Pre-modern Japan: The Rise and Fall of the Samurai (3 credits)


    An introductory survey of the society and culture of pre-modern Japan, this course examines the formation of the early Japanese imperial state, the disposition of Japan’s feudal rule by military elite, and the commercial and social conditions that characterized the early modern era in Japan. Particular attention is directed to the transformation of the samurai from proud and able warriors into what was by the nineteenth century in all practice little more than a class of inflexible bureaucrats and raucous brigands.
  
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    HIST 348 Q* - Modern Japan: From the Last Samurai to the Pacific War (3 credits)


    Together students and instructor consider the ideas, principles, and values that underpinned Japan’s traditional culture and society even as Japan’s selective absorption of Western paradigms and cultural forms is studied. Students learn to build for themselves a better understanding of the role values-traditional and modern, Japanese and non-Japanese-played in the historical process of national integration and rapid industrialization that marked Japan’s emergence as a twentieth century power. F, S.
  
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    HIST 349 - Modern China: Reform and Revolution in the Modern Age (3 credits)


    A survey of Modern China from the rise of the Qing Dynasty in 1644 to the economic boom of the post-Deng 1990’s. Students examine China’s experience of Western incursions since the 1830’s, through the course gives primacy to the impact of domestic-born institutional and cultural innovations that presaged the arrival of the Western Powers. An investigation of China’s inner-history of reform and revolution enables students to appreciate the way in which Modern China was as much the product of domestic processes as it was the result of changes wrought by the West.
  
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    HIST 350 - Vietnam: The American Experience, 1941-1982 (3 credits)


    The French colonial experience in Vietnam, the development of Vietnamese nationalism, the rise to power of Ho Chi minh; the deepening American commitment, the anguish of the American experience, the collapse of a peace that never was, the end of the American backed regime of Nguyen Van Thieu in 1975, and the aftermath of the War in the United States.
  
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    HIST 351 - The Ottoman Empire, 1281-1923 (3 credits)


    This course will explore the major events and themes of the Ottoman Empire from the late 13th to the early 20th century. It will look at the empire’s origins, expansion, stagnation, decline, reformation attempts, World War I, the War of Independence and the creation of the Turkish Republic, and, finally, the Ottoman legacy in the Balkans and the Middle East. F, S.
  
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    HIST 352 - Topics in the Modern Middle East (3 credits)


    This course will focus on a variety of selected topics in 19th and 20th century Middle Eastern history. It may explore a number of themes related to the late Ottoman Empire, the Arab World, the Eastern Mediterranean, the Caucasus, Iran, Israel, Turkey and US-Middle Eastern relations. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 353 - The History of India (3 credits)


    An examination of the historical development of India from the time of the Mughal Empire, including the period of British dominion culminating with independence in 1947, and democratic India under the Nehru dynasty from independence to the present.
  
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    HIST 354 - The Modern Middle East since 1918 (3 credits)


    This course provides a survey of the social, economic and political history of the Middle East from the end of World War I to the Arab Spring and its aftermath. The impact of developments from the Ottoman reform period, the European colonial era and the years of political independence may be examined. The course may also explore a number of topics such as the Arab-Israeli conflict, the rise of nationalism, the role of oil, the resurgence of political Islam, direct American intervention in the region and the events of the “Arab Spring”. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 355 - Latin American Culture and Civilization (3 credits)


    A broad-based historical study of cultures and civilizations across the diverse geographic and socio-economic regions of Latin America. Students will examine how geography, religion, social movements, and cultural heritage shape the histories of the region. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    HIST 356 - History of Latin American Foreign Relations (3 credits)


    (=POLI 489 ) A study of major issues such as foreign intervention, globalization, debt crises, and political violence facing states and societies in recent Latin American history. Students will explore connections between the people and governments of Latin America, Europe, and the US since the 19th century, focusing on the development of US dominance in Latin America in the 20th century and its effects. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 357 - Exploring Middle Eastern Conflict (3 credits)


    This course examines the history of Middle Eastern conflict between the late 19th century and the present. It may consider such topics as nationalism, ethnic nationalism, population exchanges/refugees, ethnic conflict, colonialism, post-colonialism, civil war, war, the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and terrorism. The course may require students to engage a wide-ranging selection of primary and secondary texts from different political perspectives. The course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 358 - Borderlands: The Balkans and Caucasus since 1878 (3 credits)


    This course will analyze the major events and themes of Balkan and Caucasian history during the late 19th & 20th centuries. We will cover such topics as nationalism, independence movements, terrorism, state building, population exchanges, genocide/ethnic cleansing, the Balkan Wars, the World Wars, Communism, the Cold War, the Greek-Turkish disputes, the collapse of Yugoslavia, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict and energy politics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 359 Q - History of Latin American Popular Culture (3 credits)


    This course explores the history of popular culture in Latin America and provides students with insight into the culture, practices, and institutions that create national identities in Latin America. In this course students study popular culture within the frameworks of nationalism, state-building, revolution, and empire and analyze a range of primary and secondary sources from Latin America. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 360 - The Early Republic 1783-1820 (3 credits)


    This course examines the emerging nation in the wake of the American Revolution. Topics include the Confederation period, the Constitutional Convention, the battle over ratification, and the presidencies of Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison and Monroe.
  
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    HIST 361 - Antebellum Period 1820-1850 (3 credits)


    This course examines the political, social, and economic forces that enlarged, enriched, and empowered the United States while simultaneously hastening the nation toward civil war.
  
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    HIST 362 - Becoming American (3 credits)


    This history course will take a holistic approach to the theme “Becoming American,” a process at times called “Americanization.” We may explore the ideas of American Identity, Regionalism, Immigration and Migration, the American Dream, Citizenship and the Nation, Diversity and Multiculturalism. This course introduces students to the craft and concepts involved in interdisciplinary knowledge production within the Humanities. Students may be exposed to materials used in a multitude of disciplines and will be asked to evaluate and interpret such documents as historical primary sources, memoirs, literary works, films, photographs, artifacts, music, and art. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 363 - Black Atlantic & African Diaspora (3 credits)


    In this course, students investigate the meanings of the Black Atlantic and the African Diaspora concepts generally studying the migrations of black people through the four Atlantic continents from the 17th century forward. Students explore several themes, such as: Slavery and the Laws in the Black Atlantic, Emancipation and Freedom, Transatlantic Voyagers, Black Cultural Unity, Resistance, and Citizenship. Primary sources are analyzed to investigate the continuity and change of themes over time, and to understand from a participant’s point of view. In addition, secondary sources are used for insights into the time period and for current historiography. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 364 - Readings in American History (3 credits)


    This is an undergraduate course in which students analyze primary sources and examine major secondary works to achieve greater understanding of the social, political, economic, and intellectual development of the United States. This course explores major historical trends and events and provides ample opportunity for individual research, reflection, and group discussion. Topics may vary by instructor; this course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 365 - Critical Moments in American History (3 credits)


    This course focuses on specific events that changed the course of American history. Students engage primary and secondary sources while analyzing the causes and consequences of each historical event. Reading and writing assignments will advance the notion of contingency – the argument that even minor alterations in actions or circumstances can produce different historical outcomes. Topics may vary by instructor; this course may be repeated for up to six credit hours.  F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 366 - Comparative Empires (3 credits)


    A topical study of empires. Emphasis is placed on the development of political, social, economic, and cultural practices and institutions. May be taken no more than two times under different topics.  F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 367 - Colonial America (3 credits)


    An examination of the history of the American colonies from their beginnings through their evolution into mature provincial societies. Emphasis is placed on the interactions among colonists, native Americans, and African slaves, as well as the development of distinctive regions.
  
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    HIST 368 - The Frontier in U.S. History (3 credits)


    A thorough examination of America’s westward expansion and the impact of a frontier on the social, political, and economic development of the United States. Included will be a study of frontier life, myths, and legends.
  
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    HIST 369 - Native American History (3 credits)


    A detailed examination of North American Indian cultures and history from early colonization to the present including Indian wars, federal Indian policy, and the contemporary ethnocentric movement.
  
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    HIST 370 - Revolutionary America (3 credits)


    Study of the American Revolution era: the social and political causes of the rebellion, the war, the turbulent decade of the 1780’s and the ratification of the Constitution. Emphasis is placed on the political debates of the period and the lives of ordinary Americans during these times.
  
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    HIST 371 - Civil War and Reconstruction (3 credits)


    Analysis of major problems of American history from the sectional conflict over slavery and secession through the war years and the reconstruction of the nation.
  
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    HIST 372 - U.S. History 1876-1917 (3 credits)


    From the end of the Reconstruction to the First World War; Industrialization, Imperialism, and Reform.
  
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    HIST 373 - U.S. History 1917-1945 (3 credits)


    Political, economic, social and cultural development during World War I, the “Roaring Twenties,” the Depression, and the Second World War.
  
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    HIST 374 - U.S. History 1945 to the Present (3 credits)


    A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States since the end of World War II, the “Cold War,” and the global confrontation between the United States and the communist world.
  
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    HIST 375 - Exploring Peace in the Middle East (3 credits)


    This course examines the history of peace efforts in the Middle East, divergent historical narratives and the role of historians in conflict transformation and historical reconciliation. The course requires students to engage a wide-ranging selection of primary and secondary texts from different political perspectives. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 383 - History of the Colony and State of South Carolina (3 credits)


    A study of South Carolina’s origins and development and a survey of recent South Carolina history with emphasis on social and institutional development.
  
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    HIST 385 - Regional Studies in American History (3 credits)


    This course will focus on selected regions of the Americas and may emphasize the development of the political, social, and cultural history of the instructor’s chosen region of study through a variety of lenses. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S.
  
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    HIST 386 - History of American Women (3 credits)


    The social, political and economic roles and changing status of women in America.
  
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    HIST 388 - Hollywood’s America (3 credits)


    An examination of selected topics in American political, social and cultural history through the medium of Hollywood-produced films. Topics may include the filmed presentation of World War II, gender and race issues, Cold War American culture, and “American Memory” through film.
  
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    HIST 389 - The New South (3 credits)


    The Bourbon era, agrarian revolt, industrial revolution, racial problems, and the changes resulting from the impact of the Depression, New Deal, and two world wars.
  
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    HIST 390 - History of American Business (3 credits)


    (Prereq: HIST 201  or HIST 202 ) The course will survey the American economy from colonial times to the late twentieth century. The development of agriculture, commerce, manufacturing, and finance will be explored. Emphasis will be given the roles of technology and innovation concurrent with territorial expansion. Students will review government policies regarding taxation, currency, labor, and banking.
  
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    HIST 392 Q - Museums and Communities (3 credits)


    (=ANTH 381 ) This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of museum studies, covering the history, development, and definitions of a museum. This course explores how museums function, including operations, interpretation and representation of the past, exhibitions, collections care, education, and public programs. Students in this course examine current practices and issues in museums, with an emphasis on museums’ relationships to their communities, and their roles in society and culture. Students also participate in a hands-on project related to exhibition design and implementation, field trips, and interaction with guest speakers in the field.  F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 393 - Crime and Punishment in Early America (3 credits)


    This course examines criminal behavior (or actions defined as such) and its consequences in Early America. Themes and topics may include the development of systems of law in the colonies, modes of punishment, methods and theories of deterrence, legal and judicial inequities in the new nation, the emergence of penitentiaries and prison systems, attempts at rehabilitation of convicts and the philosophies or rationale behind those efforts. F, S, May.
  
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    HIST 395 Q - Introduction to Public History (3 credits)


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of public history. It explores the methods, theories and practices of public history. The course examines such public history tracks as museums, archives, national parks, cultural resource management and historic preservation, and introduces students to such topics as oral history, popular culture and environmental protection. While studying professions related to and meeting professionals in public history, the course will survey and implement public history tools, which may include technology, media, consulting, tourism and exhibits. Students will also be immersed in real-world experiences dealing with public history and learn more about post-baccalaureate employment opportunities as well as graduate programs in public history. F, S, Su.
 

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