Jan 30, 2023  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Exercise and Sport Science

  
  •  

    EXSS 497 - Practicum in Sport Coaching (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 301  and EXSS 330 ) Supervised field experience coaching a team in a recreational, amateur or educational setting. Students required to accumulate at least 100 approved and supervised contact hours. Course also requires self-study and successful completion of a national, external coaching certification. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 499 - Directed Undergraduate Research in Exercise and Sport Science (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: EXSS 205  and approved written contract between student, instructor, and department chair) A faculty-supervised research project within exercise and sport science. Students develop skills and abilities of research through the completion of an approved project. Projects are developed with a faculty member and approved with a written contract and specific requirements.

Finance

  
  •  

    FIN 301 - Business Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in: ECON 201 , CBAD 201 , CBAD 291  or STAT 201 , MATH 131  or MATH 132 ) Theoretical foundation of optimal financial policy with an emphasis on working capital, capital budgeting, financing, and dividend decisions and how they affect the valuation of the firm. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    FIN 302 - Survey of Commercial and Investment Real Estate (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ; a grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 363  or FIN 301 ) An international study of real estate from a commercial and investment perspective. The international nature of the course requires attention to topics including global ethics, cultural diversity, legal, and economic aspects as they vary across the globe and impact real estate. Theoretical grounding in urban and institutional economics motivates the study. Fundamental methods of financial valuation of real estate are explored and analyzed with an international backdrop.
  
  •  

    FIN 400 - Financial Industry Exam Preparation (0 to 3 credits)


    This is an exam preparation course covering topics related to the General Securities Registered Representative Exam (Series 7). This course will expose students to topics currently covered by the Series 7 examination including (but not limited to) corporate, equity/fixed-income securities, local/state/federal government, securities, derivative securities, and investment company products. This course is not affiliated with FINRA, the Series 7, exam provider, and does not exempt students from the examination eligibility requirements. Pass/Fail grading only. This course may be repeated for up to six credits. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 401 - Corporate Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Financial theory and techniques for the analysis and solution of financial problems dealing with acquisition of funds, topics include capital structure, cost of capital, dividend policy, and valuation. The case method and computer simulation is utilized. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 402 - Investment Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Financial theory and techniques for overall investment analysis. Conceptual and analytical framework for formulating investment policies and analyzing securities. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 403 - Financial Institutions and Markets (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Principal institutions and markets comprising the financial system; their roles in short-term, long-term and equity financing, interest rate determination and capital formation; interrelationships between domestic and international financial markets; government policy objectives and regulations as influences on the financial system. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 404 - Business and Financial Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) The analysis of the profitability and viability of a commercial enterprise. Primary focus given to the analysis of a firm’s accounting practices and financial statements from the framework of overall business analysis. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 421 - Multinational Corporate Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301  or CBAD 363 ) Analysis of institutions and practices unique to the financial management of multinational business enterprises. All aspects of international financial management are covered with a concentration on the corporate form and the increasing importance of global integration of money and capital markets. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 441 - Financial Derivatives (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) This course is designed as an introduction to risk management and derivatives. The course employs practical applications to introduce students to the risk management process. The course will provide an introduction to the following topics: option and futures basics, derivatives securities markets, valuation of derivatives, derivative trading strategies, the management of corporate risk, and an overview of the use of derivatives in accounting. F.
  
  •  

    FIN 442 - Retirement and Estate Planning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) In-depth coverage of money management concepts and practices necessary for intelligent control over personal income and expenditures, topics include introduction to financial planning, risk management, investment management, tax planning and management, retirement planning and employee benefits, and estate planning. Utilizes case analyses. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 462 - Real Estate Finance and Investment (3 credits)


    (=HRTM 467 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301  or CBAD 363 ) Principles and practices in real estate finance focusing on institutions, instruments, and determinants of terms and availability of credit, topics include interest and yield mechanics, cash flow analysis, risk analysis, and various loan strategies or packages.
  
  •  

    FIN 463 - Risk Management and Insurance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Introduction to the concepts of risk and its management through the use of insurance. The student will become familiar with different types of risks and the solutions that are delivered by various organizations. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 491 - Advanced Corporate Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 401 ) In-depth coverage of advanced topics in corporate financial management using computer simulations and dynamic multi period case studies. Long-and short-term corporate financial policy formation is examined against the backdrop of firm value maximization and the market for corporate control. Special consideration is given to mergers, acquisitions, and corporate restructuring. SEC reporting requirements and formats are integrated throughout. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 492 - Portfolio Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 402 ) Conceptual and analytical framework for formulating investment policies and constructing portfolios. This is the capstone course for the Wealth Management Concentration. Special topics may be introduced. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 493 - Financial Institutions Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 403 ) In-depth coverage of financial institutions management with an emphasis on depository institutions. A bank management computer simulation is integrated throughout the course as a dynamic multi-period case. The simulation provides a unique opportunity for students to practice depository institutions management techniques in an environment in which earlier decisions impact latter decisions. In addition to managing a simulated bank, the student will conduct financial analysis on other banks in the simulation industry. The course material includes current readings from various business publications. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 497 - Finance Internship (0 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: 54 or more hours, minimum GPA of 2.5, and approval of the department chair) The Finance Internship is a supervised work experience in a financial setting. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to maintain a detailed journal relative to their workplace activities, establish specific learning goals, complete a reflective essay regarding the experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of sixty (60) hours in the internship environment per credit hour earned. Students may receive from zero to twelve (0-12) credit hours for the Finance Internship course, which may be repeated up to three (3) times for credit; however, students cannot earn more than a total of twelve (12) finance internship credit hours over the course of a single undergraduate program and only six (6) credit hours may be applied toward the minimum credit hours required for a single Coastal Carolina University degree. F, S, Su.

French

  
  •  

    FREN 110 - Introductory French I (3 credits)


    Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 111 - Introductory French I-II (3 credits)


    (Intensive) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, Equivalent to FREN 110 -FREN 120 . Intended for students with two years of high school French with an average grade of ‘B’ or better, or by placement.
  
  •  

    FREN 115 - French Studies I (5 credits)


    This class introduces students to the French language and the many facets of French culture. This course also helps students develop the basic skills of speaking, listening, and communicating in everyday situations in French culture. As a hybrid course, this course will deliver three credit hours face-to-face and two hours via a distance learning format. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 120 - Introductory French II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 110  or by placement) A continuation of FREN 110 . Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 210 - Intermediate French Language and Culture I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 115  or FREN 120  or by placement exam) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework, with particular emphasis on reading. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 220 - Intermediate French Language and Culture II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 210 ) Intensive review of fundamental language skills and preview of advanced level skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework, with particular emphasis on reading.
  
  •  

    FREN 225 - French Conversation I (1 credit)


    Intensive practice in intermediate spoken French.
  
  •  

    FREN 250 - French Literature in Translation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ENGL 101 ) Selected readings of French literature from the Middle Ages to the Modern Era in Translation. Discussion and analysis of a variety of texts, including prose, drama, and poetry, and consideration of their cultural and historical backgrounds. Work for the class includes reading assignments, short critical essays, and comparative studies of the works read.
  
  •  

    FREN 270 - Introduction to French and Francophone Culture (3 credits)


    A general introduction to French and Francophone society and culture for intermediate level students. Intensive practice in spoken and written French with special emphasis on increased cultural understanding. F.
  
  •  

    FREN 280 - Cinema for French Conversation (3 credits)


    A practice of intermediate French conversation focused on French cinema. Intensive practice in spoken and written French with special emphasis on increased cultural understanding through cinematic representations of French culture. S.
  
  •  

    FREN 305L - Discussion for French/Francophone Cultural History through Literature (1 credit)


    (Coreq: LIS 305 ) Additional discussion to accompany/supplement LIS 305: selected translated readings of French/Francophone literature from a range of time periods, literary movements, and genres; discussion and analysis of a variety of texts, with consideration of their cultural and historical backgrounds. Course taught in French. This course may be repeated up to two times for credit under different topics. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 310 - French Grammar and Composition (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 220  or equivalent) Intensive practice in French grammar and composition. Students should also register for FREN 325 .
  
  •  

    FREN 311 - French Conversation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 210  or equivalent) Intensive practice in spoken French.
  
  •  

    FREN 316 - French Phonetics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 210  or equivalent) A course in pronunciation of French with attention to correction of difficulties encountered by English speakers. Students will make regular use of the language laboratory.
  
  •  

    FREN 325 - French Conversation II (1 credit)


    (Prereq: FREN 220  or equivalent) Intensive practice in advanced spoken French.
  
  •  

    FREN 350 - French Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Approval by Foreign Language faculty) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program, students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment.
  
  •  

    FREN 390 - Introduction to French Literature I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 310  or equivalent) A survey of French literature from the Middle Ages through the 18th century.
  
  •  

    FREN 391 - Introduction to French Literature II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 310  or equivalent) A survey of French literature of the 19th century and 20th century.
  
  •  

    FREN 399 - Independent Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A written contract between the student and instructor for a special topic dealing with French language or culture, and approved by the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts) May not be used to satisfy the French Minor Core. This course may be repeated for credits under different topics.
  
  •  

    FREN 400 - French Civilization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 310  or equivalent) Practice in oral and written French through a study of the culture, history and development of France from its beginnings to the present day. Students should also register for FREN 425 .
  
  •  

    FREN 401 - La France Contemporaine (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 310  or equivalent) Reading and discussions on the culture of contemporary France.
  
  •  

    FREN 415 - French Linguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 210  or equivalent) Presentation and evaluation of various linguistic models and their application to the teaching of French.
  
  •  

    FREN 425 - Advanced Composition in French (1 credit)


    (Prereq: FREN 310 ) Development of advanced writing skills in French.
  
  •  

    FREN 448 - Teaching of French (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the department chair) Study of the latest methodologies, theories, and materials for teaching modern languages.
  
  •  

    FREN 495 - Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 350  or special permission) This is a guided internship and requires 120 hours of outside work, a journal, and a final evaluation paper. Students must have permission of the department chair before applying for internship. Application for the internship can be obtained without receiving permission from the department chair. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course’s objective, requirements, and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties - the student faculty supervisor, chair of the department, and the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization by the coordinator of internships.

Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 120 - Cultures and Environments (3 credits)


    (=ANTH 120 ) This course will introduce students to intersections between people and the world around them. We will explore the ways in which the environment shapes human cultures, how cultures adapt and change the environment, and the feedback loops that are created in an anthropogenic landscape. We will use case studies to illustrate these theories and discuss how our perspectives inform our understanding and interpretation of environments and human cultures, both past and present. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 121 - World Regional Geography (3 credits)


    An introduction to basic geographical concepts used by geographers in examining the fundamental contrasts between various countries of the world. Analysis of regions of the world, western and non-western, with respect to physical, cultural (both majority and minority), political and economic orientation.
  
  •  

    GEOG 200 - Digital Earth (3 credits)


    An introductory course that will provide students with an overview of existing and emerging geospatial technologies and their increasing role in shaping our daily lives and the ways in which we interact with the environment and with each other. Students will be introduced to geospatial technologies including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), mainstream internet mapping applications such as Google Maps and Google Earth, and location-driven social media. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 201 - Introduction to Physical Geography (3 credits)


    (Coreq: GEOG 201L ) An exploration of the patterns and processes of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Emphasis is placed on the spatial significance and influence of these spheres as well as human-environment dynamics. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 201L - Introduction to Physical Geography Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: GEOG 201 ) Through laboratory exercises, students will explore the patterns and processes of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Students will analyze data and employ the scientific method to understand how Earth’s patterns and processes developed and how they continue to change. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 204 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems GIS (3 credits)


    A survey course that provides an introduction to the display, manipulation and management of geographic information systems. Topics include geographical data input, storage, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 300 - Human Landscapes (3 credits)


    (=ANTH 300 ) (Prereq: ANTH 120 /GEOG 120 ) This course intensively examines the way in which anthropologists and geographers use landscape analysis in studies of the interaction between people and their environment. We will discuss the formation of anthropogenic landscapes and feedback cycles, and the way in which this affects human behaviors past and present. Case studies can include agriculture, climate change, pollution, population, urbanization, and the Anthropocene. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 301 - Concepts in Geography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ANTH 120 /GEOG 120 , or permission of the instructor) This course will explore the basic concepts, methods, and schools of thought in the discipline of geography, including human and physical geography. Students will explore the history and development of schools of thought in modern geography, including regional science, spatial science, GIScience, and critical geographies. Key concepts that will be covered include spatial analysis, scale, space and place, human-environment interaction, globalization, and development. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 310 - Digital Cartography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GEOG 200  or GEOG 204 , or permission of the instructor) An introductory course that will provide students with an overview of maps, mapmaking (cartography), and the tools and techniques of digital cartography. Students will be introduced to geospatial technologies utilized in cartography, including Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Through a combination of lectures, discussions, and hands-on exercises, students will explore the design and production of digital maps and cartographic visualizations, and develop an understanding of the ethical and social issues involved in the mapmaking process. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 311 Q - Earth Observation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GEOG 200  or permission of the instructor) An introductory course that provides students with an overview of earth observation through remote sensed images from aircraft and satellites. Students are introduced to basic concepts such as the origin of remote sensing and earth observation programs, as well as remote sensing technologies such as aerial and satellite imaging systems and related geospatial technologies such as GIS that are utilized in processing, analyzing and presenting data gathering from earth observation sensors. Through a combination of lectures, discussions, and hands-on exercises, students explore the remote sensing process and how it is used for earth observation, types of remotely-sensed data, analysis methods, and applications of earth observation techniques. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 312 - Spatial Analysis Using GIS (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GEOG 204 ) An intermediate course that builds on students’ Geographic Information Systems (GIS) skills to explore the use of GIS in spatial analysis and modeling. Topics covered include types of GIS analysis functionality, developing models to perform spatial analysis, introduction to specialized spatial analysis techniques such as terrain analysis and network analysis, and presentation of spatial analysis results using appropriate cartographic and geovisualization techniques. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 320 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (3 credits)


    The interrelationship of weather elements and controls and the spatial distributions of climate and vegetation. Students will become familiar with the basic concepts and processes associated with weather (atmospheric and oceanic circulation, temperature, moisture, pressure, winds, weather systems), as well as become familiar with climate types, climate variability and the impact of human activity on weather and climate found throughout the world today. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 331 - Topics in Historical Geography (3 credits)


    This course explores the way in which geographic phenomena change through time. We seek to understand how cultural, geographic, and political features developed by examining the interaction of human societies and their physical and social environment. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of themes such as historical landscape study, cultural interaction, immigration, environment, and economic change. Students explore each topic in depth through a combination of lectures, discussions, readings, and hands-on projects or research papers. The course may be repeated for up to six (6) hours of credit under different topics. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 341 - Geography of Food and Agriculture (3 credits)


    Food is a fundamental human need that impacts our health, shapes our cultural identities, influences our daily lives, and guides our politics from local to international scales. Thus, agriculture is one of the most important human endeavors, but also one which has had one of the largest impacts on the earth system. This course explores the geography of food and agriculture from a critical perspective. It examines the ecological, social, and political economic aspects of a range of agricultural production systems, from large-scale commercial monocrops to small-scale agroforestry and permaculture homegardens. It examines some of the largest contemporary challenges to agro-food systems in our age of globalization and their sustainability and social justice implications, such as population growth, climate change, and biofuels. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Written contract between student and instructor) This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
  •  

    GEOG 400 - Geospatial Intelligence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GEOG 200  or permission of the instructor) This course provides students with an introduction to existing and emerging geospatial technologies and their application across a wide range of disciplines dealing with intelligence, security, and decision making. Students will explore the geospatial technologies utilized in intelligence analysis, including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), and 3D visualization, develop hands-on skills in digital mapping and explore applications of geospatial intelligence in a number of fields, including defense intelligence, law enforcement, and emergency management. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 424 - Geography of North America (3 credits)


    Physical and cultural geography of North America with emphasis on the United States.
  
  •  

    GEOG 425 - Geography of Europe (3 credits)


    Physical and cultural geography of Europe.
  
  •  

    GEOG 426 - Geography of Latin America (3 credits)


    Physical, cultural, and economic geography of Latin America.
  
  •  

    GEOG 450 - Digital Heritage: Historical Digital Reconstruction (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 450 ) (Prereq: Permission of the instructor) This course leverages digital technologies as tools for studying, visualizing, and contextualizing various aspects of material culture, including sculpture, architecture, and ritual objects. Central to this course is critical engagement with digital tools as used in the fields of art history, archaeology, public history, and virtual heritage. Focused on a semester-long historical case study, this course is predominantly hands-on, providing an opportunity for students to develop and utilize interdisciplinary and transferable skills, including 3D modeling, mapping digital photography, photogrammetry, and graphic and web design. To that end, students will conduct focused research on an object, monument, or site in order to produce a full documented essay. This essay will form the scholarly basis for a digital project that may employ any appropriate technologies, including Photoshop, SketchUp, GIS, Omeka/ Neatline, Dreamweaver, and Tourweaver. The course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 452 Q - Digital Heritage: Virtual Landscapes (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 452 ) This course introduces students to a variety of digital technologies that can be used to recreate and represent historical and contemporary landscapes, as well as to present historical content and scholarly documentation within virtual landscape platforms. The critical visualization of landscapes is a practice of growing importance in the fields of digital and public history, archaeology, art and architectural history, cultural geography, and digital heritage. Students need no prior technical expertise to complete this course. Students will learn how to build interactive 3D models using digital authoring software, and how to generate virtual landscape features and platforms in various software packages. Students also work collaboratively to develop multimedia scholarly content that documents the changing landscapes of a digital place. For the final project, individual 3D models and multimedia content are embedded within an immersive and interactive virtual landscape. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 456 Q - Video Game Worlds (3 credits)


    This course explores the concepts and methods of virtual worldbuilding and the use of environmental storytelling in modern 3D video games as a mechanism for creating immersive, interactive narratives. Throughout the course, we discuss these concepts through readings and interaction with modern 3D video games to explore how these concepts and storytelling mechanics are implemented. During the course, we will also get hands-on experience with game and virtual world building tools such as Unity, in preparation for designing and building our own virtual world stories/games for an in-depth, hands-on final project. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 491 - Special Topics in Geography/GIS (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GEOG 121  or GEOG 200 , AND permission of the instructor) An advanced course that will allow students who have already completed introductory courses in GIS and Geography to explore focused applications and research problems within the field. Topics can range from geography areas of interest such as urban geography or historical geography to specialized areas of inquiry in geospatial technologies, including urban planning, disaster management, historical GIS, 3D geovisualization, etc. Students will explore each topic in depth through a combination of lectures, discussions, readings, and hands-on projects or research papers. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOG 495 Q - Internship in Geography/GIS (1 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Internship opportunities across a wide range of institutions, agencies, organizations and businesses are available to students. This course may be repeated for credit. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 496 - Developing Research for Professional Venues (1-3 credits)


    (Prereq: Permission of the instructor) In this course, students complete and revise their research projects under the close supervision of a member of the department to make them ready for presentation at professional venues and/or publication.  F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 498 - Capstone in Anthropology and Geography (3 credits)


    (=ANTH 498 ) (Prereq: ANTH 120 /GEOG 120  and ANTH 300 /GEOG 300 ) This course gives students the opportunity to synthesize the intersection of Anthropology and Geography in a capstone seminar that focuses on research and writing. Students will participate in readings, discussion, and a final paper that allows in-depth analysis of a selected case study. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOG 499 - Senior Thesis (3 credits)


    (=ANTH 499 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) A course designed to assess and improve research skills, writing ability, and general mastery of the field. Under the close supervision of a member of the department, students will review primary and secondary source materials and write one 20-page thesis of graduate school quality. F, S, Su.

Geology

  
  •  

    GEOL 102 - Environmental Geology (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 102 ) (Coreq: GEOL 102L ) The geologic processes and features that affect human usage and development of Earth’s resources. Topics include natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods and volcanic eruptions, use of natural resources such as surface and ground waters, soils, and the coastal zone as well as contamination control. F, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOL 102L - Environmental Geology Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 102L ) (Coreq: GEOL 102 ) The environmental geology laboratory course focuses on active learning exercises demonstrating the dynamic interrelationships of Earth’s inhabitants, natural resources and geohazards. Specific exercises, conducted in the classroom and in the field, concern the resources and geohazards associated with mineral and rocks, global plate motions, earthquakes and volcanoes, wetlands and coastal regions and land-use issues. F, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOL 111 - Physical Geology (3 credits)


    (Coreq: GEOL 111L ) This course illustrates the methods and enterprise of science as they have been applied to interpret the earth. The technical subject matter is concerned as much with natural processes as with their products-the minerals, rocks, fossils, structure and surface forms of the earth. The course emphasizes the interplay between hypothesis, experiment, and observable fact that characterizes productive physical science. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    GEOL 111L - Physical Geology Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: GEOL 111 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in lecture. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    GEOL 112 - The Origin and Evolution of the Marine Environment (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 112 ) (Prereq: GEOL 111 , MSCI 111 /MSCI 111L ) (Coreq: GEOL 112L ) Concepts concerning the origin and evolution of the earth and seas, with ecological processes related to their development. The origin and evolution of life including primitive forms in the marine environment. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOL 112L - Marine Environment Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 112L ) (Coreq: GEOL 112 ) Laboratory and field experiences to illustrate the process of evolution in the oceans and associated marine life. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOL 304 - Marine Geology (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 304 ) (Prereq: GEOL 112 /GEOL 112L ) (Coreq: GEOL 304L ) A comprehensive study of the origin and development of the major structural features of the ocean basin and the continental margins. Discussion of the techniques used in obtaining geologic data and the interpretation of sedimentary processes, volcanism and the stratigraphy of the ocean basins. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOL 304L - Marine Geology Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 304L ) (Coreq: GEOL 304 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in lecture. F, S.
  
  •  

    GEOL 316 - Sedimentary Geology (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 316 ) (Prereq: GEOL 102 , GEOL 111 , GEOL 112 , or MSCI 112 ) (Coreq: GEOL 316L ) Introduction to concepts and practices in the field of sedimentary geology including classical stratigraphic concepts, elementary sedimentary petrology and depositional environments. Each student is required to give an oral presentation. S, odd years.
  
  •  

    GEOL 316L - Sedimentary Geology Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 316L ) (Coreq: GEOL 316 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in lecture. S, odd years.
  
  •  

    GEOL 318 - Physical Analysis of Sediments (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 318 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) (Coreq: GEOL 318L ) Detailed treatment of modern approaches to sedimentary analysis including textural and structural studies, mineral separation, beneficiation, and suspended sediment treatment of unconsolidated laboratory materials. Each student is required to give an oral presentation. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    GEOL 318L - Physical Analysis of Sediments Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 318L ) (Coreq: GEOL 318 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in lecture. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    GEOL 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and approved contract) Directed study and/or research on specific topics. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    GEOL 416 - Hydrogeology (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 416 ) (Prereq: MSCI 304  or permission of the instructor) This course will cover the elements of the hydrologic cycle, emphasizing ground and surface water movement through the hydrologic system. Topics will include hydrogeology, streams and floods, estuarine and wetland hydrology, properties of water, and the hydrologic continuum between rivers and the sea. Lecture will focus on theoretical aspects of water movement and the hydrologic system. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    GEOL 416L - Hydrogeology Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 416L ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in lecture. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    GEOL 487 - Selected Topics in Coastal Geology (1 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) These topics are designed to allow the development of seminars and courses in special areas of coastal geology.
  
  •  

    GEOL 499 - Directed Undergraduate Research (1 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: A contract must be approved by the instructor and geology minor coordinator by the time of registration) Structured undergraduate research projects conducted with faculty direction and participation, or within the context of an approved off-campus internship. Projects explore geological problems using the scientific method. One conference and no less than five laboratory hours or field research per week. F, S, Su.

German

  
  •  

    GERM 110 - Introductory German I (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. F, S.
  
  •  

    GERM 111 - Introductory German I -II (3 credits)


    (Intensive) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, Equivalent to GERM 110 -GERM 120 . Intended for students with two years of high school German with an average grade of ‘B’ or better, or by placement.
  
  •  

    GERM 115 - German Studies I (5 credits)


    This class introduces students to the German language and the many facets of German culture. This course also helps students develop the basic language skills of speaking, listening, and communicating in everyday situations in German-speaking cultures. As a hybrid course, three credit hours are delivered face-to-face and two hours via distance learning format. F, S.
  
  •  

    GERM 120 - Introductory German II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 110  or by placement) A continuation of GERM 110 . Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. F, S.
  
  •  

    GERM 210 - Intermediate German Studies I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 115  or by placement) Intensive review and enhancement of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework. F, S.
  
  •  

    GERM 255 - Intermediate Conversation (1 credit)


    (Prereq: GERM 115 ) Students improve oral proficiency skills through conversation practice in topics related to everyday life in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.  F, S.
  
  •  

    GERM 301L - German Language and Culture Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Practice in various aspects of the German language in conjunction with a course with an LIS designation on a topic related to German. Activities may include conversation, translation, reading, and listening exercises. May be used to fulfill required electives for the German minor. This course may be repeated for up to six credits under different topics. F, S.
  
  •  

    GERM 309 - The German Play (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 211 ) Students read two plays in the original German, discuss the ideas in the play in the target language, and practice pronunciation and dramatic expression. The class culminates in a performance in German of one of the two plays.  F, S.
  
  •  

    GERM 310 - German Grammar and Composition (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or equivalent; permission of the Department) Intensive practice in German grammar and composition.
  
  •  

    GERM 311 - German Conversation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  and permission of the Department) Intensive practice in spoken German.
  
  •  

    GERM 350 - German Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Approval by Foreign Language faculty) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment.
  
  •  

    GERM 390 - Introduction to German Literature I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or equivalent; permission of the Department) Reading and discussion of representative works of German prose, drama, and lyric poetry from Germanic times through the late eighteenth century.
  
  •  

    GERM 391 - Introduction to German Literature II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or equivalent; permission of the department chair) Reading and discussion of representative works of German prose, drama, and lyric poetry from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
 

Page: 1 <- 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14Forward 10 -> 23