Oct 03, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Politics

  
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    POLI 425 - The Arabic Language, Media and Politics in the Middle East (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) Understanding basic terms in the Arabic Language is a key to understanding politics, media, culture and Islam in the Middle East. In this course students will gain the basic tools to enable them to understand current political discourse through main sources of Arabic media, gain basic elements and terms of modern Arabic language, and facilitate their studies of the Middle East.
  
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    POLI 426 - The Middle East Through Film (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101 ) Through a series of films, students will be exposed to a unique approach to understanding some of the Middle East’s most complex issues and become more familiar with the main actors, places and events of this region. The course will focus on the major current questions of Middle East politics including Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Oil and Wahhabism, the Iranian Revolution, the Arab Spring, refugees, terrorism and the rise of al-Qaida and the Islamic State. F, S.
  
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    POLI 430 Q - Model European Union (1 credit)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A brief survey of the history, institutional structure, policies, procedures and functioning of the European Union (EU) - a key player in global governance. The course is designed to prepare students for competitive participation in the annual Model European Union conference. The Model European Union gives students an opportunity to hone their skills at negotiation, public speaking, critical thinking, expository writing, team-building, leadership, and problem-solving. The course is offered during spring semester. This course may be repeated up to three times for credit. F, S.
  
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    POLI 431 Q - The Model United Nations (1 credit)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A brief study of the history, mission, policies, and procedures of the United Nations designed to prepare students for competitive participation in the annual Southern Regional Model United Nations conference in Atlanta. This course may be repeated up to eight times for credit. It may be counted up to three credits for political science major or minor requirements. F.
  
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    POLI 432 - Great Decisions in U.S. Foreign Policy (1 credit)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) This course is centered on the Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions program, where students participate in hosting the program as part of a community and academic outreach initiative of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts each Spring. The course also includes follow-on discussion groups on-line related to the current event topics selected by the Foreign Policy Association each year. The course may be repeated up to three times for credit. S.
  
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    POLI 435 - Globalization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course will survey the various theories and issues surrounding the process of Globalization and anti-Globalization within the study of International Relations. It will draw on historical, economical, financial, cultural, and political issues-areas of Globalization in a multitude of regions.
  
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    POLI 438 - International Human Rights (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) Development of the promotion and protection of international human rights and fundamental freedoms.
  
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    POLI 439 - International Law (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) The origin, development and principles of the international law of peace and the enforcement of these principles. The law of war and pacific settlement disputes.
  
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    POLI 440 Q - South Carolina State Legislative Process (1 credit)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) An introduction to the practice of state legislative procedures. Students are required to participate in the South Carolina Student Legislature activity. This course may be repeated up to eight times for credit. It may be counted up to three credits for political science major or minor requirements. F, S.
  
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    POLI 441 - Legal Reasoning (1 credit)


    A laboratory course on test taking techniques and strategies for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    POLI 444 Q - Moot Court (1 credit)


    This course is an experiential approach to understanding the appellate court process. Students develop their understanding of the judicial process and learn about important legal principles by forming two-person teams and developing and arguing a fictional appellate case. Students are required to argue their cases at invitational and regional elimination tournaments sponsored by the American Collegiate Moot Court Association. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 447 Q - Trial Advocacy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) The focus of this course is the art and science of trial advocacy and litigation, with concentration on basic evidence and trial procedure. This course will prepare the student for practice litigation with an emphasis on the art of trying a case from inception to conclusion. This course will also include mock trial practice.
  
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    POLI 448 Q - Mock Trial (1 credit)


    Mock Trial is an activity in which students learn the principles of trial advocacy and then apply those principles as they try a fictitious case. Mock trial gives undergraduate students an opportunity to learn firsthand about the work or trial attorneys, understand the judicial system, develop critical thinking, increase self-confidence, and develop the ability to work well with others. This course may be repeated up to eight times for credit. It may be counted up to three credits for political science major or minor requirements. F, S.
  
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    POLI 449 - Constitutional Law I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the Supreme Court decisions that have shaped the institutional powers, constraints, and interactions of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government. Selected covered topics include the constitutional powers of Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court; federalism; the Commerce Clause; and substantive due process. F, S.
  
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    POLI 450 - Constitutional Law II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the Supreme Court decisions that have shaped the boundaries of the civil rights and liberties protected by the Constitution. Selected covered topics include the liberties enumerated in the first Ten Amendments of the Constitution, and the civil rights of citizens protected in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments of the Constitution. F, S.
  
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    POLI 451 - The Supreme Court (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the role of the Supreme Court in American politics. Covered topics include the historical development as an institution, the selection and nomination process of Supreme Court justices, the nature of the Supreme Court decision-making, the relationship between the Supreme Court and the other branches, and other relevant topics.
  
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    POLI 452 - The Judicial Process (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the growth of law, the law-making function of the courts, the structure and organization of federal and state courts, the procedures involved in civil and criminal cases, and the problems and proposals for reform in the administration of justice.
  
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    POLI 453 - Regulatory Policies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) An examination, primarily by the case method, of the law of public offices, the types of powers exercised by administrative authorities, the scope and limits of such powers, including relevant aspects of procedural process of law, and remedies against administrative action.
  
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    POLI 455 - American Jurisprudence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) (Prereq: sophomore standing or permission of the instructor) An examination of the approaches and controversies concerning legal interpretation and legal reasoning in the American political order. A major focus of the course is constitutional interpretation. Readings will be drawn principally from the writings of major figures in American jurisprudence.
  
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    POLI 456 - Administrative Law (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the public law dealing with the structure, authority, policies, and procedures of administrative and regulatory agencies. Covered topics include agency rulemaking, agency adjudication, investigation and enforcement, political control of agencies, judicial review of agency decisions, governmental liability, and rights of public employees. S.
  
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    POLI 457 - Environmental Law (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the public law, regulations, and court decisions governing environmental policy in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on the important governmental and private actors involved in the policy making process. Covered topics include air and water regulation, toxic substances, the regulation of energy production, and the regulation of public lands. F, S.
  
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    POLI 459 - Social Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course is an examination of the theory and practice of social policy, with a primary focus on U.S. policy. Topics include theories and models of social policy formation and implementation by political institutions and the impact of policies on individuals and groups in society. A significant focus is placed on the content and design of policy in selected areas, including income security, education, health, and family. S.
  
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    POLI 462 - The Legislative Process (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the structure, organization, powers, functions and problems of legislative bodies.
  
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    POLI 463 - The American Chief Executive (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) The constitutional powers and political roles of the American President with lesser emphasis upon state governors. An analysis of the chief executive and administration, executive relationships with legislatures, and party and popular leadership by the executive.
  
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    POLI 466 - South Carolina Government and Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the politics and government of South Carolina with special attention paid to the state political and legal institutions, their power, and limits to their power.
  
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    POLI 467 - American Local Government (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the powers, organizations, processes, and programs of municipal government, with special emphasis upon government in metropolitan areas.
  
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    POLI 481 - Democracy and Development in Africa (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course explores the conceptual and empirical connections between democracy and economic development in Africa. It considers the conditions under which different democratic forms and economic development perspectives emerge on the African continent. F, S.
  
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    POLI 488 - Politics and Governments of Contemporary Latin America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) The development, principles, political thought, and politics of the several Latin American states.
  
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    POLI 489 - US-Latin American Relations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course provides a regional overview of International Relations by focusing on the Western Hemisphere. The primary focus will be on U.S.-Latin American relations, given the dominant role the United States has played in the region, since the early 1800s. The course looks at key historical periods and the theoretical underpinnings of U.S. policies directed toward the nations of the Americas. It also discusses the foreign policies of Latin American states with the United States and each other. The course further explores the role of inter-governmental organizations, such as the Organization of American States (OAS) and its influence in promoting key issues such as hemispheric cooperation on counter-drugs and security issues, as well as promoting democratization and trade. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 491 Q* - Topics in Government and International Studies (3 credits)


    Reading and research on selected subjects in politics. Open to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    POLI 495 - Internship in Political Science (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201 , junior level with 3.0 GPA, and permission of the instructor) Internships are available in local, state, or federal government offices. Students may do an internship for academic credit of three (3) hours and must work at least 120 hours at an organization during the semester registered. Grades are determined by a combination of the evaluation of the internship performance by the facility supervisor and faculty supervisor. Requirements are specifically stated in a contract to be signed by the student, faculty supervisor and facility supervisor. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics. It may be counted up to six credits for political science major or minor requirements. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 496 - Topics in Latin American Politics and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A topical approach to Latin America employing a variety of teaching materials and techniques. Among the topics treated are women and race, recent and contemporary themes in Latin American civilization, political institutions and ideology.
  
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    POLI 497 Q - The Discipline of Political Science (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 200  and completion of 90 credit hours; or permission of the instructor) Designed to be the capstone course for students majoring in political science. This course focuses on the nature and development of the discipline of political science. Particular attention is given to controversies concerning the scope and methods of conducting research in political science. Students design and carry out independent research culminating in a capstone project. Political Science majors should take this course no earlier than the last semester of their junior year. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 498 Q* - Variable Credit Internship (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and GPA of 3.0 or higher) This course is designed to facilitate off-campus, semester-long internships for students interested in the practice of politics and policymaking. It is designed to be variable credit based on the needs of the student. Permission of adviser is necessary to enroll. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics. It may be counted up to six credits for political science major or minor requirements. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 499 - Senior Thesis (3 credits)


    A course designed both to assess and improve research skills, writing ability, and general mastery of the field of politics. Under the close supervision of a member of the department, students will review primary and secondary source materials and write one 25-page thesis of graduate school quality.

Portuguese

  
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    PORT 110 - Introductory Portuguese (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. F, S.
  
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    PORT 120 - Introductory Portuguese II (3 credits)


    Elective. (Prereq: PORT 110 , or by placement) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
  
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    PORT 130 - Introductory Portuguese III (3 credits)


    Elective. (Prereq: PORT 120 , or by placement) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.
  
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    PORT 350 - Portuguese Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: PORT 120 , or by placement) (Coreq: approval from the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program, student must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment.

Professional Development Activities

  
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    PDA 100 - Building Your Business Portfolio (0 credits)


    This course consists of weekly sessions that will expose students to a variety of important topics relevant to the business major, including degree and career options in business, the academic advising process, study abroad, internships, student involvement and other experiential opportunities. The course will also introduce students to the Building Your Business Portfolio program and the Professional Development Activities (PDAs) that are associated with the program. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    PDA 110B - Exploring Major and Career Options in Business (0 credits)


    (Restricted to Business majors only) (=PDA 100 ) This course exposes students to the degree and career options in business. The course also introduces students to the Building Your Business Portfolio program and the Professional Development Activities (PDAs) that are associated with the program. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    PDA 120B - Exploring Experiential Opportunities in Business (0 credits)


    (Restricted to Business majors only) This course exposes students to the experiential opportunities relevant to the business major. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    PDA 130B - Building a Professional Profile (0 credits)


    (Restricted to Business majors only) This course exposes students to the process of creating, organizing, and/or refining their professional profiles. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    PDA 140B - Transitioning from Student to Professional (0 credits)


    (Restricted to Business majors only) This course prepares students for their transition from their academic careers to their professional careers. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    PDA 340 Q* - Special Topics in Business (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) This course allows for the development of Professional Development Activities (PDAs) in a specific business area not generally available in the curriculum. This course may be repeated. Offered as needed.

Psychology

  
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    PSYC 101 - General Psychology (3 credits)


    (=PSYC 101H ) A general introduction to the scientific study of behavior. The theme of basic research will be followed through the study of personality, learning and memory, cognition, developmental, social, abnormal, and the biological bases of behavior, in addition to some other selected topics. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 202 - Introduction to Scientific Communication: Psychological Perspectives (3 credits)


    An in-depth exploration of the role(s) in Psychology of oral and written communication; includes communication-skill development through an examination of the literature of specialized areas of Psychology. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 225 - Psychological Statistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PSYC 101 , and a grade of ‘C’ or better in MATH 130  or placement into MATH 131  or above) (Coreq: PSYC 225L ) An introduction to basic descriptive and inferential statistical procedures and concepts. Topics include measures of central tendency, variation, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, and chi square. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 225L - Psychological Statistics Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PSYC 225 ) Exercises and assignments to supplement the material presented in PSYC 225 . F, S.
  
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    PSYC 226 - Research Methods in Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PSYC 101  and PSYC 225  or equivalent) (Coreq: PSYC 226L ) An examination of the wide variety of procedures available to the behavioral scientist for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. Although experimental methods are to be emphasized, other methods such as surveys and questionnaires, interviews, naturalistic observation and case studies are covered. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 226L - Research Methods in Psychology Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PSYC 226 ) Experiments; exercises and assignments to supplement the material presented in PSYC 226 . F, S.
  
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    PSYC 300 - Human Sexual Behavior (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) An examination of the psychological, social, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of human sexuality. Selected topics to be covered are sexual anatomy and physiology, contraception, sexually transmitted disease, sexual variations, commercial sexuality, and sexual violence. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 301 - Psychology of Marriage (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) A survey of the psychological issues related to marriage. Topics include spouse selection, sexuality, child bearing, parenting, divorce, remarriage, and aging. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 302 - Developmental Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A survey of human development from conception through senescence, with attention to the physical, psychological, cognitive, and social characteristics of each state. Students are introduced to research methods used by developmental psychologists and the impact of their findings to everyday life. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 303 - Interpersonal Communication Skills (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) An in-depth examination of communication processes with a practical emphasis on developing effective listening and speaking skills appropriate to an interpersonal context. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 310 - Psychology of Women (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) The social, psychological and biological aspects of women’s development are addressed and explored. The changing roles of women, and the impact of these changes upon present day lifestyles are also discussed. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 333 - Health Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A survey course exploring the relationships between behaviors and disease. The influence of psychological factors and precipitating, treating, and preventing disease is examined with the goal of increasing each person’s awareness of individual responsibility in sickness and health. F.
  
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    PSYC 340 - Sports Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) The application of behavioral principles to enhance athletic performance and to promote human enrichment through sport-related activities. Topics studied include personality, attentional mechanisms, anxiety and arousal adjustment, cognitive-behavioral interventions, and motivation. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 381 - Readings in Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) An in-depth examination and discussion of selected readings, including journal articles, books, or other original sources, in the field of psychology. Su.
  
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    PSYC 391 - Psychology GRE Prep (1 credit)


    (Restricted to junior or senior standing) (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) This course is intended for juniors and seniors who plan to take the GRE general test and/or GRE Psychology subject test. Students will work on vocabulary and math skills, take several practice tests, and learn test taking strategies. S.
  
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    PSYC 392 - Graduate School Preparation in Psychology (2 credits)


    (Restricted to junior or senior standing) (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) An exploration of graduate programs in psychology. Topics include choosing a graduate program in psychology, creating a curriculum vita, writing an effective personal statement, and guidelines for requesting letters of recommendation. S.
  
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    PSYC 399 Q* - Independent Study (0 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Written contract between student and instructor, approved by the chair of the Psychology Department.) F, S.
  
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    PSYC 400 - Human Learning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) In-depth examination of various kinds of human learning, from simple to complex behaviors. Topics include motor learning, verbal learning, attention, memory systems and models, forgetting, problem solving, and learning strategies and sets. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 401 - Cognitive Processes (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) Experimental approaches to cognitive processes. Data and theory with respect to attention, information processing and storage, imagery, language, problem solving, creativity, decision making, cognitive development and growth, and concept formation. F.
  
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    PSYC 402 - Psycholinguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A survey of selected aspects of the field focusing on the cognitive and behavioral foundations of child and adult language acquisition. Other topics may include developmental and catastrophic language disorders, neurolinguistics, and the language-thought interaction. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 407 - Principles of Learning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A survey course covering the basic principles of human and animal learning. Topics include habituation and sensitization, classical and instrumental conditioning, principles of reinforcement, generalization and discrimination, punishment, escape and avoidance learning, basic principles of memory, and behavior modification techniques. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 410 - Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A survey of the historical, social, and cultural implications of abnormal behavior. Topics include the nomenclature used to classify abnormal behavior, etiological factors and treatment procedures. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 411 - Abnormal Behavior in Children (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) This course examines theories of childhood psychopathology and the classification of childhood disorders. Methods of assessment and treatment for specific childhood disorders are considered. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 415 - Human Neuropsychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) An in-depth examination of the role of the brain and nervous system in human behavior and psychological disorders. Consideration of the consequences of brain damage and disease in human patients are the focus of the course, but conditions such as depression and anxiety in which there is no obvious brain pathology are also discussed. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 420 - Child Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) This course examines principles, theories, and research methods used in the study of child development. Students are introduced to important physical, cognitive, social and personality changes which occur in each of the major stages from conception through the onset of puberty. Hereditary and environmental influences are explored in relationship to current research findings. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 421 - Psychology of Adolescence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A detailed analysis of the developmental period from puberty to young adulthood, including physical, cognitive, psychological and social factors that influence human growth. Problems and issues unique to adolescents are researched and discussed. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 423 - Psychology of Aging (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) An overview of the aging process in the adult. The physical, intellectual, social aspects of development will be traced through the major phases of young, middle- and late-adulthood. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 425 - Gerontology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) An in-depth analysis of the aging process in late adulthood through death and dying. Psychosocial influences on normal and diseased aging processes will be examined. An emphasis on procedures and strategies for effectively intervening with both well and frail elderly will enable the student to integrate knowledge of gerontology into a disciplinary context. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 428 - School Psychology and Exceptional Children (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) This course describes exceptional children within educational settings. Topics will include giftedness, learning disabilities, mental disabilities, emotional/ behavioral problems, and sensory/motor impairments. The characteristics, etiology, assessment and treatment of children within these categories will be examined. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 430 - Social Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) An examination of human behavior in social situations. Topics include attitudes and attitude change, affiliation and interpersonal attraction, prejudice, stereotypes, social order, conformity, altruism, territoriality, aggression, competition, cooperation, socialization, and communication. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 440 - Theories of Personality (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A survey of the major personality theories of the “normal” individual as explanations of behavior and human differences. Topics include trait factor theories, psychodynamic theories, social/behavioral theories and humanistic theories. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 450 - Sensation and Perception (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) An in-depth study of each sensory system (orienting, cutaneous and kinesthetic sensitivity, olfaction, gustation, audition, vision). Topics include structures and functions within each system, development of systems, psychological perceptions and sensations, illusions, and interactions between systems. S.
  
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    PSYC 455 - Psychology of Aggression (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) An examination of the many different types of aggression and aggressive behaviors in different contexts. The course also covers the etiology of aggressive and antisocial behaviors in humans, including an examination of the impact of personality characteristics, cognitions, and contexts on aggressive behaviors. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 460 - Physiological Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A survey of the relationships between the nervous system and behavior. Topics include basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, signaling and information processing in the nervous system, psychopharmacology, and selected behavioral topics such as biological rhythms, hunger, thirst, learning and memory. S.
  
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    PSYC 462 - Animal Behavior (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) The identification and classification of behavior patterns exhibited by various species of animals and the determination of relationships among behaviors of such species together with their origins and development. S.
  
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    PSYC 465 - Psychology and the Law (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) This course is designed to examine the multiple and ever-expanding roles that psychology plays in the legal/criminal justice system. Topics include legal procedural issues, pretrial publicity issues, jury selection, eyewitness identification and testimony, lineup procedures, presentation of scientific evidence, expert witnesses, jury decision-making, death penalty, and insanity pleas. S.
  
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    PSYC 470 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) This course provides an introduction to the area of industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology and how psychological research is applied to behavior in the workplace. Topics include recruitment and selection of employees, the effects of job satisfaction and job commitment on performance, antecedents and consequences of work-related stress, and motivation and leadership. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 480 - Intermediate Statistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PSYC 225  or equivalent) (Coreq: PSYC 480L ) An examination of additional topics in applied behavioral statistics. Topics include linear correlation and regression, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and multivariate statistics. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 480L - Intermediate Statistics Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PSYC 480 ) Exercises and assignments to supplement the material presented in PSYC 480 . F, S.
  
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    PSYC 483 - Principles of Psychological Testing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PSYC 101  and PSYC 225  or equivalent) (Coreq: PSYC 483L ) A survey of the psychometric process. Topics include the principles of measurement and test score interpretation, discussion of the variety of group and individual tests available for psychologists and the criteria for selecting and evaluating tests. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 483L - Principles of Psychological Testing Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PSYC 483 ) Exercises and assignments to supplement the material presented in PSYC 483 . F, S.
  
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    PSYC 484 - History and Systems of Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: at least 9 credit hours in Psychology) This course is a comprehensive, in-depth study of approaches and recognized contributors to the scientific study of human behavior. Students are introduced to how and why psychology emerged, and the impact that past contributions have made to present-day status. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 486 - Substance Abuse (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) An introduction to research findings and theoretical considerations in the use and abuse of pharmacological agents such as alcohol, barbiturates, narcotics, tranquilizers, and stimulants. Emphasis will be placed upon concepts of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 489 - Special Topics in Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 ) A topical or research interest not offered in an existing course. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    PSYC 490 Q* - Internship (0 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: PSYC 101 , 2.5 GPA, and permission of the instructor) Interns work a minimum of 33 hours per credit in an agency, organization, or business that is of interest to the student and/or where students wish to gain practical experience. Students are supervised by a department faculty member and will abide by the procedures outlined in an Internship Agreement. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 495 - Gerontology Internship (3 credits)


    (=SOC 495 ) (Prereq: PSYC 423  and three additional Gerontology Program courses) The internship provides experience working with both well and frail older persons and requires a minimum of 104 hours with an approved agency. The internship is supervised by the program director and an on-site professional with a specialized terminal degree and/or significant demonstrated experience. Contracts outlining practicum requirements must be written and approved by the host agency, the director of the gerontology program, and the chair of the Department of Psychology. Offered as needed.
  
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    PSYC 497 Q* - Applied Research in Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PSYC 225  or equivalent, and a grade of ‘C’ or better in PSYC 226 ) (Coreq: PSYC 497L ) A research experience in which students are required to develop a research project, conduct a literature review, gather and analyze data, prepare a research paper in accord with the standards of the American Psychological Association (APA) and present their research. Motivated students are encouraged to complete this course in their junior year and continue research pursuits during their Senior year. F, S.
  
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    PSYC 497L - Applied Research in Psychology Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PSYC 497 ) Exercises and assignments to supplement the material presented in PSYC 497 . F, S.
  
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    PSYC 498 Q* - Individual Research (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: 15 credits including PSYC 225  and PSYC 226 ) Each student plans and executes one or more original research projects under the instructor’s supervision. Psychology 498 is not a prerequisite to PSYC 499 . F, S.
  
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    PSYC 499 Q* - Individual Research (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: 15 credits including PSYC 225  and PSYC 226 ) Each student plans and executes one or more original research projects under the instructor’s supervision. PSYC 498  is not a prerequisite to Psychology 499. F, S.

Public Health

  
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    PUBH 121 - Personal and Community Health (3 credits)


    An investigation of issues related to improving personal and community health. Emphasis will be on physical fitness, mental health, nutrition, stress management, sexuality, relationships, diseases, and complementary medicine for health-care.
  
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    PUBH 201 - Philosophy and Principles of Public Health (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PUBH 121 ) An exploration of underlying philosophies and principles of public health. An overview of social, cultural, and physical environmental factors which influence perceptions and valuation of health, and condition responses to health related knowledge. F, S.
  
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    PUBH 222 - Medical Terminology (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the principles of medical word building to develop the necessary medical vocabulary used in health care settings. Using a systems-approach, students study, analyze and interpret root words, prefixes and suffixes with emphasis on spelling, pronunciation, definition and use of medical terms. As part of the learning process, students are exposed to basic anatomy, physiology, pathology of disease, and clinical procedures. F, S.
  
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    PUBH 235 - Advanced Emergency Care and First Aid (3 credits)


    This course is designed to prepare the student to respond appropriately when faced with an emergency situation. Emergency Response certification may be earned with a score of 80 percent or better. Physical activity to perform various skills in CPR and First Aid is required.
  
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    PUBH 284 Q - Public Health Field Experience (2 credits)


    (Prereq: PUBH 201 ) An exploration of public health settings through experiential learning to introduce professionalism and career discovery. Through a supervised 30 hour field experience, students gain a better understanding of the public health field. Potential field experience sites are identified by the student and approved by the course instructor and/or the Public Health Internship Coordinator. F, S.
 

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