Oct 03, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 399H - Interdisciplinary Independent Study (3 to 9 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Directed independent study at the honors level in two or more departments. For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations section in this catalog. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    PHIL 419 - Epistemology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101 , one PHIL course at the 300 level, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction to the problems and methods of modern epistemology. It explores central questions such as “What is it to know something?” and “What is it about some beliefs that make them more highly justified than others?” The central focus of the course is the study of the relationship between justification and knowledge. It pays careful attention to the skeptic who claims that no one ever knows anything and that no one is ever justified in believing anything.
  
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    PHIL 420 - Metaphysics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101 , one PHIL course at the 300 level, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) This course focuses on issues that center around such notions as substance, causality, essential properties, individuation, time, possible but nonactual states of affairs, and identity. Among the questions considered are: “Do any of the things there are endure through time?” “How should we understand possible but nonactual states of affairs?” “Are subjects of consciousness just complexes of subatomic particles?” “Are material objects like tables and chairs ultimately made up of things that have no parts?”
  
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    PHIL 490 - Capstone Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior standing) This seminar engages philosophy majors in research and discussion involving an advanced topic in philosophy. The final paper will be a work demonstrating both research skills and original argument, and will be suitable for submission to an undergraduate conference or journal. Students will present their final papers to the philosophy faculty at the completion of the course. F.
  
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    PHIL 495 - Internship for Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Students will receive instruction and gain professional experience in an internship while working 10 hours per week for 12 weeks with a local business. Course contract must be approved prior to registration.
  
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    PHIL 498 - Advanced Research in Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 3.0 GPA, PHIL 271 , at least two courses in philosophy at the 300 level or above, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) Students will explore philosophical writing relating to an intended thesis topic, in an area of philosophy that they have previously studied. They will acquire knowledge of research methods in philosophy, synthesize readings in identifying a thesis topic, and prepare a thesis prospectus. Students will present their thesis prospectus to a committee of no less than three members of the philosophy faculty and one outside reviewer. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHIL 499 - Senior Thesis in Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior standing) Students will plan, execute, and write an original philosophy paper under the direction of a thesis adviser in philosophy. The thesis will reflect a mastery of philosophical writing skills, research skills, and content knowledge, and will be suitable for submission to an undergraduate conference or journal. The student will present the thesis to the philosophy faculty at the completion of the course. F, S.

Physical Education

  
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    PHED 360 - Motor Behavior (4 credits)


    (=EXSS 360 ) (Prereq: EXSS 205  or EDPE 131 ) A study of the development (maturation and growth), acquisition, retention, and transfer of motor skills and behavior throughout the lifespan. Emphasis given to the underlying processes in the control, learning, and performance of motor skills. As a foundation course for motor skill practitioners working with a variety of ages and populations, the content blends principles of motor learning/control, motor development, and sport psychology.
  
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    PHED 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    F, S.

Physically Active Living Skills

  
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    PALS 102 - Fitness Walking (1 credit)


    Introduction to low-impact, cardiovascular endurance activity of walking. Proper techniques of walking, warm-up, and cool down are practiced. Topics include benefits, injury prevention, weight management, and goal setting relative to a personal fitness program.
  
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    PALS 103 - Tai Chi (1 credit)


    Provides a fundamental understanding and practice of the Tai Chi philosophy, principles, applications and benefits. Emphasis on basic practices of Chi-Gung.
  
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    PALS 104 - Group Fitness (1 credit)


    Provides a variety of exercise class formats to improve cardiovascular fitness. Formats include, but not limited to kickboxing, step aerobics, water exercise, yoga, circuit training, interval training, and hi-lo aerobics.
  
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    PALS 105 - Yoga (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basic physical and mental skills of yoga. Development of improved levels of somatic awareness, joint flexibility, muscle function, energy, stress management, mental focus, and injury prevention.
  
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    PALS 106 - Step Aerobics (1 credit)


    Introduction of the step form of aerobics as a cardiovascular workout. Basic step patters, routines, progression, and choreography are practiced. Topics also include basic exercise science and nutrition.
  
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    PALS 107 - Pilates (1 credit)


    Emphasis on the development of strength, flexibility and endurance. Body awareness skills include core stability and balance in areas such as pelvis, back, and shoulder girdle, neutral alignment, and patterned breathing.
  
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    PALS 108 - Fitness Kickboxing (1 credit)


    Introduction to kickboxing for cardiovascular and muscular fitness. Emphasis on basic kicking and boxing patterns, techniques, safe kicks, punches, and combinations. Topics also include concepts of improved aerobic endurance, muscular flexibility, balance, strength and tone, and nutrition.
  
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    PALS 109 - Aquatic Fitness (1 credit)


    Provides a safe and effective form of non- or low-impact progressive resistance exercise to develop muscular strength and endurance, improve cardiovascular fitness and increase flexibility. No swimming skills are needed for this aquatic class.
  
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    PALS 110 - Indoor Cycling (1 credit)


    Stationary cycling methods emphasizing aerobic and anaerobic endurance at all fitness levels. Topics include exercise science concepts, fitness principles and technology.
  
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    PALS 111 - Jogging (1 credit)


    Overview of the preparation, training principles, and suggested programs for jogging as exercise. Emphasis given to progression of fitness, techniques, fitness principles, safety and injury prevention, and personalizing program.
  
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    PALS 112 - Personal Fitness Assessment (1 credit)


    Provides assessment and prescription of the components of personal fitness. Emphasis on using current technology and assessment techniques to plan and monitor fitness activities to meet personal goals.
  
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    PALS 113 - Triathlon Training (1 credit)


    Provides training concepts and practice in the three elements of a triathlon: swimming, biking, and running. Students must know how to swim and provide their own bicycle and helmet. Some training activities may be held off campus.
  
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    PALS 114 - Fitness Swimming (1 credit)


    Emphasis on the refinement of swim strokes, wall turns, endurance swimming, and swimming for cardiovascular and muscular fitness. Students must first demonstrate competence in the four basic swimming strokes.
  
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    PALS 116 - High Intensity Training (1 credit)


    Introduction to high intensity training to improve muscle strength and function. Emphasis placed on orientation to facilities and equipment, planning an effective program, fundamental principles and techniques of safe and effective muscular and cardiovascular conditioning. F, S.
  
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    PALS 117 - Beginning Strength Training and Conditioning (1 credit)


    Introduction to resistance training to improve muscle strength and function. Emphasis placed on orientation to facilities and equipment, planning an effective program, fundamental principles and techniques of safe and effective muscular conditioning.
  
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    PALS 118 - Intermediate Strength Training and Conditioning (1 credit)


    Intermediate/ advanced skills associated with strength training for fitness and muscle function. Strength training experience is expected, and topics include concepts such as muscle physiology, advanced training programs, and individualized goal setting.
  
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    PALS 119 - Personal Fitness Vehicles (1 credit)


    Introduction to the skills and knowledge necessary to safely and effectively ride human powered vehicles (such as a Trikke carving vehicle) for improved fitness and recreation.
  
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    PALS 120 - Personal Fitness and Technology (1 credit)


    Exploring, implementing, and evaluating current technologies as a tool for understanding, developing, and maintaining personal fitness and a healthy lifestyle. Students participate in a variety of health-enhancing physical activities across all components of personal fitness and wellness.
  
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    PALS 124 - Army Physical Fitness (1 credit)


    Introduction to the components of fitness. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of training principles and physical conditioning and the improvement of personal fitness levels. Course includes exercise testing, exercise leadership and team competitions. F, S.
  
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    PALS 125 - Beginning Golf (1 credit)


    Fundamentals of golf for the beginning participant. Emphasis placed on essential techniques, concepts, rules and etiquette for successful participation. Course meets at Coastal’s Quail Creek Golf Course.
  
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    PALS 126 - Intermediate Golf (1 credit)


    Fundamentals of golf for the experienced participant. Emphasis placed on practice and mastery of golf shots, strategy, rules and etiquette.
  
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    PALS 127 - Beginning Tennis (1 credit)


    Fundamentals of tennis for the beginning participant. Emphasis on basic tennis skills and techniques, rules, scoring and etiquette to participate successfully.
  
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    PALS 128 - Intermediate Tennis (1 credit)


    For the experienced participant, emphasis on mastery of strokes and shots, advanced strategies, match play and etiquette.
  
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    PALS 129 - Indoor Racquet Sports (1 credit)


    Introduction to the fundamentals of indoor racquet sports including but not limited to: racquetball, pickleball, and badminton. Emphasis on basic skills, scoring, rules, etiquette and strategy.
  
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    PALS 130 - Lacrosse (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basic skills and techniques for successful participation in the sport of lacrosse. Emphasis on skill progressions, rules, strategies and game play.
  
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    PALS 132 - Advanced Yoga (1 credit)


    (Prereq: PALS 105 ) Designed for students who want to further the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of their practice of yoga to improve physical wellness, reduce stress and increase mental focus/clarity. This course builds upon the techniques and concepts learned in PALS 105 Yoga. This course may be repeated two times for credit. F, S.
  
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    PALS 133 - Beginning Bowling (1 credit)


    For beginning participants, topics include basic technique, grip, approaches, releases, spot bowling techniques, rules, equipment, scoring and safety procedures. Course meets off campus.
  
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    PALS 134 - Intermediate Bowling (1 credit)


    Emphasis on skill development for students with prior bowling knowledge and experience. Topics include strategy, accuracy, and scientific concepts. Course meets off campus.
  
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    PALS 135 - Flag Football (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basic skills, safety, history, rules and game strategies/variations, and fitness principles to participate successfully in flag football (co-ed).
  
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    PALS 136 - Soccer (1 credit)


    Designed to teach fundamental skills for game performance, history, rules and game strategy.
  
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    PALS 137 - Basketball (1 credit)


    Study designed to introduce beginning and intermediate level skills instruction and strategies leading to active participation in game situations.
  
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    PALS 138 - Volleyball (1 credit)


    Study designed to introduce beginning and intermediate level skills instruction and strategies leading to active participation in game situations.
  
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    PALS 139 - Softball (1 credit)


    Designed to teach fundamental skills for game performance, history, rules and game strategy.
  
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    PALS 140 - Fencing (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basics of the sport of fencing. Emphasis on safety, equipment, techniques, strategic concepts, scoring and rules, physical and mental preparation, and a progression toward competition.
  
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    PALS 141 - Rugby (1 credit)


    Introduction to the rules and techniques for successful participation in rugby. Includes modified and international games and the development of basic game skills and tactical game situations.
  
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    PALS 142 - Sand Volleyball (1 credit)


    Skill instruction, knowledge, and strategies leading to successful participation in sand volleyball.
  
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    PALS 150 - Ropes Course (1 credit)


    An introduction to the use and benefits of a ropes course using the Challenge Course at Coastal Carolina University as a laboratory. Participation focuses on accepted terminology, concept development, and skill acquisition.
  
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    PALS 151 - Sailboarding (1 credit)


    Instruction in the art and skill of sailboarding. The student develops the necessary basic techniques to perform the activity.
  
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    PALS 152 - Angling (1 credit)


    Instruction in the proper techniques of bait casting, fly casting, and spin casting. Opportunities are provided for practicing each technique.
  
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    PALS 153 - Canoeing and Kayaking (1 credit)


    Introduction to canoeing/kayaking as a leisure activity. Emphasis on learning and practicing strokes mechanics, safety procedures, and trip planning on flat water. Some off-campus experiences required.
  
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    PALS 154 - Horseback Riding (1 credit)


    An introduction to the various aspects of horseback riding. The student develops the physical skills and the knowledge of safe practices and proper use of equipment.
  
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    PALS 156 - Beginning Rock Climbing (1 credit)


    Introduction to the activity and development of basic rock climbing skills and techniques. Topics include safety, equipment, belay, fitness requirements, and climb variety.
  
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    PALS 157 - Cycling (1 credit)


    Students develop a knowledge of the types and uses of different bicycles. Safety equipment and safe riding techniques are stressed along with the different levels of intensity of training and use of cycles. (Students are responsible for furnishing their own bicycle.)
  
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    PALS 158 - Snow Skiing (1 credit)


    An introduction to the various aspects of snow skiing. Focus of the course is on skill and safety, correct attire and equipment, and skiing techniques prior to completing a ski trip. (Students are responsible for costs associated with the ski trip.)
  
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    PALS 159 - In-line Skating (1 credit)


    Techniques and concepts of in-line skating. Topics include safety principles, physical conditioning and fitness concepts, and equipment care. Skates provided if needed.
  
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    PALS 160 - Wilderness Camping (1 credit)


    Exposure to and study of the wilderness environment. Emphasis is on conservation of the natural environment and camping without a trace. Students develop skills in various aspects of campcraft. (Students are responsible for costs associated with the trip.)
  
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    PALS 161 - Backpacking (1 credit)


    Instruction in the fundamentals of backpacking for those students who have had previous camping experience and are interested in learning basic wilderness and survival skills, to include basic first aid, low impact camping methods, physical conditioning and environmental living skills. (Students are responsible for food costs for trip.)
  
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    PALS 162 - Beginning Social Dance (1 credit)


    For the beginning participant, emphasis on basic steps, patterns, and progressions of modern forms of social dance such as shag, salsa, tango, waltz, fox trot, swing, samba, and cha cha. Topics include social elements, etiquette, and fitness principles.
  
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    PALS 163 - Advanced Social Dance (1 credit)


    (Prereq: PALS 162 ) For the experienced participant; practice and mastery of advanced dance patterns and forms including but not limited to: shag, salsa, tango, waltz, fox trot, swing, samba, and cha cha.
  
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    PALS 164 - Modern Dance (1 credit)


    Introduction of fundamental skills, techniques, and concepts as applied to various forms of contemporary dance
  
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    PALS 165 - Ballet (1 credit)


    Study designed to introduce fundamental skills and terminology as they apply to ballet.
  
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    PALS 166 - Jazz (1 credit)


    Study designed to introduce fundamental skills and terminology as they apply to jazz dance.
  
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    PALS 167 - Ocean Board Sports (1 credit)


    Basic knowledge and skills to enjoy a variety of water-based board sports. Course includes an introduction to basic ocean, water, and equipment safety, and practice in several water-based board sports (skim boarding, boogie boarding, and paddle boarding). Note: The ability to swim is a requirement for this course. This course may be repeated two times for credit. F, S.
  
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    PALS 169 - Beginning Swimming (1 credit)


    For the beginning or non-swimmer. Emphasis on the basic swim strokes, water survival skills, and principles of swimming and water safety.
  
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    PALS 170 - Introduction to Snorkeling and Kayaking (1 credit)


    An introduction to breath-hold diving using surface support (snorkeling) systems and the basics of flat-water, wash-deck kayaking.
  
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    PALS 171 - Beginning Scuba Diving (1 credit)


    Concepts and practice of SCUBA life support systems and preparation for the SCUBA certification. Academic topics include safety, equipment, dive analysis, physics, physiology, health, and environment. Water skills include buoyancy control, communication, emergency procedures, breathing techniques, equipment management, and rescue skills. Certification and dive costs are required. May only be taken once for credit.
  
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    PALS 172 - Advanced Scuba Diving (1 credit)


    (Prereq: PALS 171  or equivalent certification) Theory and practice of NAUI advanced SCUBA diving techniques, skills and experience.
  
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    PALS 173 - Introduction to Surfing (1 credit)


    Basic knowledge, skills and enjoyment of surfing and a general understanding of ocean safety. Focus is on learning the local surf areas, different style of waves, and conditions.
  
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    PALS 174 - Scuba Rescue (1 credit)


    (Prereq: PALS 172  or equivalent certification) To prepare divers to prevent or handle problems or emergencies. CPR and first aid training also covered.
  
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    PALS 175 - Beginning Karate (1 credit)


    An introduction to the fundamentals and basics of Karate. Emphasis on blocks, strikes, kicks, footwork, and fitness principles.
  
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    PALS 176 - Intermediate Karate (1 credit)


    An extension of karate fundamentals and basics. Emphasis on advanced blocks, strikes, kicks, and footwork to expand concepts of this martial art.
  
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    PALS 177 - Self-Defense (1 credit)


    An introduction to combative activities and self-defense skills. Emphasis placed on preventative measures for personal safety and protection.
  
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    PALS 178 - Women’s Self-Defense (1 credit)


    An introduction to combative activities and self-defense skills. Emphasis placed on preventative measures for personal safety and protection for personal safety and protection for women and women’s issues.
  
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    PALS 179 - Outdoor Adventure Activities (1 credit)


    Course provides an introductory sampling of outdoor adventure activities. Activities may include but are not limited to: hiking, paddling, biking, wilderness camping, orienteering, ropes course, and rock climbing. Course includes active participation and technical skills, risk management, trip planning, first aid, and equipment care. Lab fee covers equipment usage. Students are separately responsible for costs associated with required trip (identified in class syllabus). F, S.

Physics

  
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    PHYS 101 - Introduction to Physical Science I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in six credit hours in mathematics or statistics, or permission of the instructor) (Coreq: PHYS 101L ) The course teaches physical principles as they relate to the societal use of energy. The following energy technologies with their associated pollution problems are examined: fossil fuels, heat engines, hydroelectric power, nuclear power, solar power, energy conservation, and small scale energy systems. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 101L - Introduction to Physical Science I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 101 ) The laboratory will demonstrate the topics and principles presented in the lecture. Problem sessions and three laboratory hours per week. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 102 - Introduction to Physical Science II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in six credit hours in mathematics or statistics, or permission of the instructor) (Coreq: PHYS 102L ) An introduction to physical science including physics, chemistry, geology, and astronomy. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 102L - Introduction to Physical Science II Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 102 ) The laboratory will demonstrate the topics and principles presented in the lecture. Problem sessions and three laboratory hours per week. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 103 - Science of the Physical World (3 credits)


    (Coreq: PHYS 103L ) This course is designed specifically for non-science majors who have an interest in a general physical science course. Students develop a good understanding of the process of science and the critical thinking skills needed to make informed decisions based on scientific evidence. (This course cannot be used in conjunction with SCIE 101  and SCIE 101L  to satisfy science Core Curriculum requirements under the 2006-2007 and prior catalogs.) F, S, Su.
  
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    PHYS 103L - Science of the Physical World Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 103 ) This course demonstrates the scientific principles taught in PHYS 103 . The emphasis is on the scientific process using hands-on active learning techniques. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHYS 137 - Models in Physics (3 credits)


    (Coreq: PHYS 137L ) This course is an introduction to the development, testing, analysis, and interpretation of models of physical systems. Through hands-on laboratory activities, students use scientific reasoning and the process of science to discover for themselves physical models that predict behavior for common, everyday applications, such as electric circuits, light, magnets, motion, and energy. The focus of the course is on how science is used as a tool towards understanding our physical world, and specifically serves as an introduction to how science is done within the context of physics. F, S.
  
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    PHYS 137L - Models in Physics Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 137 ) This course is the laboratory component of PHYS 137 . Through hands-on activities, students use scientific reasoning and the process of science to discover for themselves physical models that predict behavior for common, everyday applications, such as electric circuits, light, magnets, motion, and energy. F, S.
  
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    PHYS 201 - General Physics I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in MATH 131 ) (Coreq: PHYS 201L ) An introductory course for students not preparing for graduate work in physics. Includes a study of mechanics, thermodynamics and acoustics. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 201L - General Physics I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 201 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 202 - General Physics II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 131  with a grade of ‘C’ or better; PHYS 201 ) (Coreq: PHYS 202L ) A continuation of PHYS 201  which includes acoustics, wave motion, electromagnetic theory, optics, relativity, atomic and nuclear physics. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 202L - General Physics II Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 202 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 203 - General Physics III (4 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 202 ) A continuation of PHYS 202  which includes optics, relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic physics and nuclear physics. Six hours lecture, problem sessions and laboratory per week. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 205 - Introductory Physics for Life Sciences I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 131  or MATH 135  or by Mathematics Placement) (Coreq: PHYS 205L ) The first of a two-semester sequence intended to introduce life science majors to the concepts of physics in a biological context. Topics include Mechanics, Energy, Fluids and Waves. This three-credit lecture and one-credit lab combine for six hours of in-class work each week. F, S.
  
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    PHYS 205L - Introductory Physics for Life Sciences I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: MATH 131  or MATH 135  or by Mathematics Placement) (Coreq: PHYS 205 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. F, S.
  
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    PHYS 206 - Introductory Physics for Life Sciences II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 205 /PHYS 205L ) (Coreq: PHYS 206L ) The second of a two-semester sequence intended to introduce life science majors to the concepts of physics in a biological context. Topics include Waves & Optics, Electricity & Magnetism, Energy and Atomic Physics. This three-credit lecture and one-credit lab combine for six hours of in-class work each week. F, S.
  
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    PHYS 206L - Introductory Physics for Life Sciences II Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: PHYS 205 /PHYS 205L ) (Coreq: PHYS 206 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. F, S.
  
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    PHYS 210 - Physics for High School Teachers (4 credits)


    (Prereq or Coreq: one year of college physics; be under contract to teach in Horry, Georgetown, or Williamsburg County; and hold a valid South Carolina teaching certificate.) The course centers on mechanics, thermodynamics, wave motion, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics. Applications emphasize problem-solving techniques. Mathematical concepts are taught on an algebra and simple trigonometry level. Appropriate computer programs are reviewed. Available for teacher recertification credit only. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 211 - Essentials of Physics I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 160  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or PHYS 137  with a grade of ‘C’ or better and co-requisite MATH 160 ) (Coreq: PHYS 211L ) An introductory course for scientists and engineers. Topics covered include kinematics, dynamics, energy, and rotational mechanics. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHYS 211L - Essentials of Physics I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 211 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHYS 212 - Essentials of Physics II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 211 /PHYS 211L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: PHYS 212L ) A continuation of PHYS 211  for science majors. Topics covered include fluids, thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity, and magnetism. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHYS 212L - Essentials of Physics II Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 212 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHYS 213 - Fundamentals of Physics I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 211 /PHYS 211L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: PHYS 213L ) A continuation of PHYS 211  for physics, engineering, and other interested science students. Topics covered include oscillation, fluids, thermodynamics, wave motion, and optics. F.
  
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    PHYS 213L - Fundamentals of Physics I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 213 ) The laboratory will demonstrate the topics and principles presented in the lecture. F.
  
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    PHYS 214 - Fundamentals of Physics II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 211 /PHYS 211L  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: PHYS 214L ) A continuation of PHYS 213  for physics, engineering, and other interested science students. Topics covered include electricity, magnetism, circuits, and relativity. S.
  
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    PHYS 214L - Fundamentals of Physics II Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: PHYS 214 ) The laboratory will demonstrate the topics and principles presented in the lecture. S.
  
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    PHYS 234 - Statics (3 credits)


    (=ENGR 234 ) (Prereq: PHYS 211 ) Deals with system of forces acting on rigid bodies at rest. The course addresses the finding of resultant forces and torques for various bodies. The covered topics include concentrated and distributed forces, centers of gravity and centroids, moments of inertia, and key principles used in engineering. Special attention is directed to forces in frames, structures, beams, and cables in engineering applications. In mechanical or civil engineering, knowledge of statics is key in the design/analysis of structures that must hold their shape while bearing stress or performing a task. F.
 

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