May 21, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Reserve Officers Training Corps

  
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    ROTC 101 - Fundamentals of Military Service (2 credits)


    An introduction to the mission, organization and history of ROTC: Military and civilian obligation in relation to National Security; Individual Arms and Marksmanship Techniques, Emergency Medical Treatment. The students will receive information that will help them understand and prepare military correspondence (the Army Writing Style). Leadership Laboratory training to include thorough indoctrination in military courtesy and customs of the service, drill experience, development of initiative and self-confidence.
  
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    ROTC 101L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 101)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 101 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 102 - Introduction to the Army (2 credits)


    A discussion of the mission and responsibilities of the United States Military Forces in support of National Security with emphasis on the role of the individual, participating citizen. Students will be introduced to Map Reading Techniques. Leadership Laboratory is a continuation of ROTC 101L .
  
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    ROTC 102L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 102)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 102 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 201 - Fundamentals of Military Leadership (3 credits)


    A detailed study of the applicability of leadership principles, traits, and techniques in all job areas. Additionally, an appreciation is developed for leadership counseling techniques. The course culminates in an overview of Army organization.
  
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    ROTC 201L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 201)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 201 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 202 - Fundamentals of Military Decision Making (3 credits)


    A detailed study of orienteering to include basic fundamentals of map reading, grid systems, scale and distance, elevation and relief, military symbols, direction and location, and utilization of the declination diagram. Additionally, students will discuss the code of conduct, the principles of war and reinforce preparation of military correspondence.
  
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    ROTC 202L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 202)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 202 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 301 - Advanced Military Decision Making (3 credits)


    How to prepare and conduct military training, to include presentation and communication techniques. Included in this phase of instruction is a 10-minute oral presentation, how to cope with basic problems, i.e., discipline and motivation, encountered in small units, leadership training designed to further develop planning and organizational skills, fundamentals of offensive and defensive tactics of war. F.
  
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    ROTC 302 - Applied Military Leadership (3 credits)


    A review of the principles and fundamentals of small unit tactics, and the application of the principles of offensive and defensive combat to units of the infantry battalion. Familiarization with characteristics, operation and employment of small unit weapons, communication systems and equipment, and continued development of selected Military Skills. Orientation relative to administrative procedures, required standards of performance, and general conduct of training at Warrior Forge, the Leadership Development, and Assessment Course. S.
  
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    ROTC 401 - Leadership Management Seminar I (3 credits)


    Leadership management and professional development, a study of the U.S. Army Personnel Management System, methods of conducting Command and Staff and Unit meetings, how to prepare military correspondence, ethics and professionalism, and military justice. F.
  
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    ROTC 401L - Leadership and Management Seminar I Laboratory (0 credits)


    Leadership lab is in conjunction with each leadership and management seminar class. It is a period which supplements and reinforces through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science classes. Leadership lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army. F.
  
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    ROTC 402 - Leadership Management Seminar II (3 credits)


    Management simulation exercise and Active Duty orientation, small unit effectiveness and Army Training Management, the U.S. Army Logistics system, interpersonal skills, counseling techniques, and personnel evaluation, the Law and Principles of War, Code of Conduct and Geneva Convention, customs and courtesies of an Army officer. S.

Russian

  
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    RUSS 110 - Introductory Russian I (3 credits)


    Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S, Su.
  
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    RUSS 120 - Introductory Russian II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RUSS 110 ) A continuation of RUSS 110 . Further development of language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S, Su.
  
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    RUSS 130 - Introductory Russian III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RUSS 120 ) Further development of fundamentals language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.
  
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    RUSS 210 - Intermediate Russian Studies I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RUSS 115 or RUSS 120 )  Students gain further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) with additional consideration of culture. F, S, Su.

Science

  
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    SCIE 100 - Scientific Vessel Operations (0 credits)


    An introduction to the theory of electronic, celestial and dead reckoning navigation with each applied to practical problems in the laboratory and at sea. An introduction to boating safety, boat handling, rules of the road, minor repairs, and use of research boats as marine sampling platforms are presented and applied.
  
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    SCIE 101 - Introduction to Science (3 credits)


    (Coreq: SCIE 101L ) An introduction to the processes of science for non-science majors using the environment as a basic theme. The course, specifically designed to be the first university-level science course, draws on illustrations from all of the sciences on how to understand science and its integration into students’ lives and careers. Three lecture hours per week. F, S.
  
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    SCIE 101L - Introduction to Science Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: SCIE 101 ) Experiments, exercises, demonstrations and field experiences emphasizing the topics presented in SCIE 101 . F, S.

Sociology

  
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    SOC 101 - Introductory Sociology (3 credits)


    An introduction to the sociological study of social interaction, social structures, social institutions, social inequalities, social change, the social construction of human life, and other selected topics. Sociology draws upon a variety of social scientific research methods, sociological concepts and social theory to reveal the social basis of everyday life by exploring the interplay between society and the individual. F, S.
  
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    SOC 102 - Social Problems (3 credits)


    Analysis of social structures and processes relating to public issues in contemporary society. F, S.
  
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    SOC 201 - Sociological Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course will provide an introduction to the principles of sociology as well as emphasize written and oral communication skills. Students will be asked to exercise and develop their “sociological imagination” through a series of oral and written assignments. F, S.
  
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    SOC 298 - Careers and Professional Development in Gerontology (1 credit)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course introduces students to areas of specialization in gerontology and career opportunities within the discipline and related disciplines. This course explores the variety of resources available on the internet and in the University Career Resources Services office in order to assist students to find jobs or enter graduate schools after graduation. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 300 Q* - Social Justice (3 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course explores the broad context of social justice and fosters critical reflection and analysis of the social world and conditions of humanity. This course also explores individual and collective resistance for change and promotes students’ self-discovery of their own change agent skills. The course is guided by three primary questions: 1) What is social justice? 2) Why does social justice matter? 3) How do we actively participate in the struggle for social justice? Students taking Q* sections of this course receive four credit hours and must complete an additional 40-hour experiential learning activity. F, S.
  
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    SOC 301 - Gender and Society (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course examines gender in terms of men’s and women’s identities and normative behaviors that occur in gendered institutions within an inequitable, patriarchal social structure that allots power and privilege to men over women, across all classes and races. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 305 - Sociology of the Family (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Sociological perspectives related to various aspects of family behaviors, roles and values. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 306 - Religious Cults and Violence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) An introduction to sociological perspectives related to various aspects of new religious movements or cults. Students will use sociological theories and perspectives to examine religious cults’ use of violence and violent reactions toward cults by government authorities, other religious organizations, and anti-cult movements. S, even years.
  
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    SOC 307 - Sociology of Religion (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Sociological perspectives related to various aspects of religious behavior. Includes references to non-Western religions. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 308 Q* - Community Development and Social Change (3 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) opment models and the history of community development practices. Students learn hands-on skills that will prepare them for work in community-based organizations and institutions. Students enrolled in “Q” sections of the course must complete a required community service learning component with a local community organization and will receive 4 credit hours for the class. S.
  
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    SOC 309 - Social Inequality (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The course provides a social scientific overview of how individual experiences in social reality are unequal given the stratified nature of the world. Historical trends in inequalities and contemporary hierarchical social arrangements are examined. A focus of the course is how different forms of inequality are maintained and replicated via individual behaviors and the operation of different socio-cultural institutions. Also analyzed are the efforts to challenge unjust inequalities within communities, and nation-states worldwide. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 309L Q* - Social Inequality Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) (Coreq: SOC 309 ) Qualified students taking Social Inequality (SOC 309 ) may make the course an experiential learning experience (Q) by incorporating weekly participation with an established organization or program that serves socio-economically disadvantaged individuals. F, S, Su.
  
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    SOC 310 - Social Demography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , SOC 201 , and core curriculum math requirement) Analysis of the theories, methods, issues, and data related to the characteristics and dynamics of population. F, S.
  
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    SOC 311 - Sociology of Poverty (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) A sociological analysis of who the poor are with a specific emphasis on rural America. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 313 - Social Welfare and Social Work (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Analysis of the theory and process of social services. Emphasis is placed on understanding major social service programs in the United States, their histories, trends, and public policy related to them. Students study specific social welfare programs such as income maintenance programs, social security, nutrition programs and others. The occupation of social work is addressed along with major debates regarding providers and consumers of services. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 315 - Educational Justice (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course explores the institution of education in the United States from a social justice perspective. Topics include the history of educational inequalities, standardized testing, tracking, school choice, and school funding. The course also explores race, class, and gender disparities in access to both high quality schooling and higher education. The course addresses ways in which education policies at the local, state, and federal levels have historically ameliorated or exasperated inequalities and how education can be used as an instrument for social justice and social change.
  
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    SOC 320 - Individual and Society (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101 ) Selected theoretical orientations, methodological procedures and illustrative substantive data pertaining to the relations between the individual and society. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 325 - Qualitative Research (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This is a survey course about qualitative or non-statistical research methods including (but not limited to) observational studies, ethnography, participatory research, case studies, interviewing and content analysis. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 330 - Sociological Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Theoretical perspectives on society and social behavior. F, S.
  
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    SOC 331 Q* - Methods in the Social Sciences (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; SOC 201 ) (Coreq: SOC 331L ) Introduction to the methods and problems involved in designing and conducting research in sociology and related fields. F, S.
  
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    SOC 331L - Methods in the Social Sciences Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; SOC 201 ) (Coreq: SOC 331 ) Exercises and assignments to supplement the material presented in SOC 331 . F, S.
  
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    SOC 340 - The Sociology of Drugs & Drug Control Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) A sociological examination of drug use, misuse and abuse within the historical context of social policies in the United States. A global perspective will also be considered. F, odd years.
  
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    SOC 341 - Organized Crime (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This seminar is organized as a survey of organized crime worldwide. While this course will focus on organized crime in the United States, we will also examine organized crime and organized crime groups around the world. Integral to this large scope is a focus on the historical development of the ideas surrounding organized crime. Additionally, in this course we will examine some of the strategies used to combat often unique forms of criminality. S, odd years.
  
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    SOC 350 Q* - Juvenile Delinquency (3 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The causes and consequences of juvenile delinquency and the study of the juvenile justice system. Students enrolled in “Q” sections of the course must complete a required community service learning component with a local community organization and will receive 4 credit hours for the class. S.
  
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    SOC 351 - Deviant Behavior (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The causes and consequences of deviant behavior in society, including such topics as mental illness, privileged deviance, drugs and alcohol, personal violence, and body modification.
  
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    SOC 352 - Comparative Policing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Comparative study of policing organizations in the U.S. and selected foreign countries from a social science perspective. Formal/informal policing; role/functions; legal bases; accountability /restraints; community relations; use of force; and illegal practices will be covered. We will examine how the political systems of different countries influence the way governments police their own citizens. S, odd years.
  
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    SOC 353 - Criminology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Social factors in the development, identification, and treatment of criminals. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 355 Q* - Race and Ethnicity (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) A socio-historical, theoretical, and empirical analysis of race and ethnicity, with primary emphasis on U.S. relations and trends. Cultural, political, and economic relationships on the basis of race/ethnicity are examined. Issues of prejudice, discrimination, and racism are explored as well as strategies for individual and collective action that promote equality and social justice for all races/ethnicities. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 357 - African American Communities (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , junior standing, or permission of the instructor) This course is a sociological approach to understanding African American communities, both in historic and contemporary eras. We seek to understand how structure and agency and/or oppression and resistance have given rise and shape to various facets of African American and Black communities. We pay attention to how people of African descent have worked to protect their communities, to raise their standards of living and opportunities, and have actively fought racism. The readings are a range of first person narratives, social commentary and sociological perspectives on issues such as family, faith, popular culture, and politics. Through this course you will come to understand the evolution from enslaved African, to Negro, to Black, to African American, and to the contemporary questions of who is Black and what is Blackness. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 361 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , or permission of the instructor) This course introduces students to the social determinants of health and illness. Students will examine the social, economic, and political factors that shape the health of individuals, groups, and communities. A key focus will be on patterns of inequity in health, including an exploration of the way social class, gender, race/ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation influence health-related behaviors and impact access to quality health care. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 362 - Medical Sociology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; or permission of the instructor) This course introduces students to sociological research and theory related to medical practice and medical professionals. Students will explore the connection between medicine and other important social institutions in our society, and will examine the way medical knowledge and policy shapes and is shaped by the society in which it develops. Emphasis will be placed on the social structure of hospitals, the social and cultural factors that influence patient-provider interactions, and contemporary debates regarding health care delivery systems. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 380 - Collective Action and Social Movements (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Using a sociological frame of analysis, this course explores distinctions between collective action and social movements, conditions that facilitate their development, and their impact on social, cultural, and political policies. A wide variety of social movements in American society are examined, including the Progressive era reform movements, the labor movement, the women’s movement, the environmental movement, the gay rights movement, the civil rights and other racial/ethnic movements. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 395 - Internship Experience in Sociology (0 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , permission of the instructor, and approved contract) Interns work in a supervised position in a human services, governmental, research or criminal justice agency. If desired, a student may register for SOC 499  in subsequent semesters and be awarded credit at the rate of 1 credit for every 33 hours of supervised internship. May, Su.
  
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    SOC 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; written contract between the student and the instructor, approved by the chair of the psychology and sociology department)
  
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    SOC 401 - Sociology of Corrections (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course provides a sociological view of the rationales for corrections, types of corrections, and considerations for prisoner reentry. Students will gain a broad understanding of the history of corrections, and the effects of that history on both the individual and the community. F or S.
  
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    SOC 403 - Sociology of Sports (3 credits)


    (=RSM 400 ) (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The goal of this class is to apply a sociological lens to the world of sports and athletics (a distinction that will be examined) through the incorporation of academic writing, popular media, and personal experiences and observations. F, even years.
  
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    SOC 450 - Victimology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , or permission of the instructor) Examination of sociological theories, research, and methodologies in the study of victims and analysis of the growth and institutionalization of victim advocacy. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 454 - Sociology of Death and Dying (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course focuses on the social construction of dying and death in our society as well as the ways societal expectations, values, and norms influence practices and beliefs about death. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 455 - Sociology of Aging (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Analysis of aging as a problem of socialization and the status of older people in society, their roles in the community, demographic aspects of aging, and the impact of aging upon social institutions. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 457 - Aging and Social Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) The development of public policy related to aging. Basic policy concepts, models, and methodology along with specific issues of the elderly. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 460 - Sociology of Mental Health (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Social factors in the development, identification and treatment of mental illness. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 465 - Sociology of AIDS (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , junior standing or permission of the instructor) A seminar for advanced undergraduates, this course involves student research on HIV/AIDS transmission, incidence, prevalence, and prevention worldwide and analyzes HIV/AIDS within the framework of social stratification, social movements, social deviance, social control, and international development. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 470 - Sociology of the South (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , junior standing or permission of the instructor) SOC 470 focuses on social, cultural, historical, economic, racial and demographic dimensions of the American South. Class members will conduct research and study how the South is distinct and the ways the South influences and shares the broader American society. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 480 Q* - Environmental Sociology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102  and junior standing; or permission of the instructor) The course examines key issues in the relationship between society and the natural environment. The primary focus is on social structural and cultural factors behind environmental and resource problems. Attention, however, is also given to social consequences of environmental degradation (e.g., social and economic disruption) and to social responses to environmental and resource problems (e.g., change in culture/attitudes about environmental issues, the environmental movement, community mobilization against threats). This course is a service learning course that requires 15 hours of fieldwork. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 495 - Gerontology Internship (3 credits)


    (=PSYC 495 ) (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; PSYC 423  and three additional Gerontology Program courses) The internship provides experience working with both well and frail older persons and requires a minimum of 104 hours with an approved agency. The internship is supervised by the program director and an on-site professional with a specialized terminal degree and/or significant demonstrated experience. Contracts outlining practicum requirements must be written and approved by the host agency, the director of the gerontology program, and the chair of the Department of Psychology and Sociology. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 496 Q* - Senior Capstone Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: minimum GPA of 2.5, SOC 330 , SOC 331 , STAT 201 /STAT 201L  or equivalent statistics course; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: SOC 496L ) Under a sociologist’s supervision each student proposes and completes an internship with a non-profit organization or government agency that complements their educational and career goals. F, S.
  
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    SOC 496L - Internship Capstone Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: minimum GPA of 2.5, SOC 330 , SOC 331 , STAT 201 /STAT 201L  or equivalent statistics course; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: SOC 496 ) Exercises and assignments supplement the material presented in SOC 496Q*. F, S.
  
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    SOC 497 Q* - Senior Thesis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 330 SOC 331 , and STAT 201 /STAT 201L  or equivalent statistics course; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: SOC 497L ) Each student plans and executes an original research project under a sociologist’s supervision. F, S.
  
  
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    SOC 498 Q* - Topics in Sociology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Reading and research on selected subjects in sociology. Open only to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 499 Q* - Internship (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The internship requires 90 or more hours of collegiate credit with a GPA of 2.5 or better; formal application with a resume, and a contract among the Internship agency, the student, and the department. The application process must be completed by the last day of classes of the semester prior to the internship.) Interns work a minimum of 100 hours in a human services, governmental, research, or criminal justice agency and write a paper analyzing their work experiences in light of classroom learning and knowledge. Students may take up to 9 credit hours of Sociology Internships. Offered as needed.

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 110 - Introductory Spanish (3 credits)


    Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with additional consideration of culture.
  
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    SPAN 111 - Introductory Spanish I - II (Intensive) (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, with additional consideration of culture. Intensive review of first and second semester Spanish language course intended for students with two years of high school Spanish with an average grade of ‘B’ or better, or by placement. SPAN 111 and SPAN 130  must be taken in sequence and completed with appropriate grades to fulfill Goal 5-A of the Core Curriculum. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 115 - Hispanic Studies I (5 credits)


    This class introduces students to the Spanish language and the many facets of Hispanic cultures. This course also helps students develop the basic skills of speaking, listening, and communicating in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures. As a hybrid course, three credit hours is delivered face-to-face and two hours via a distance learning format. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 120 - Introductory Spanish II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 110  or by placement) A continuation of SPAN 110 . Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture.
  
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    SPAN 130 - Introductory Spanish III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 115  or SPAN 120 , SPAN 111 , or by placement) Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 210 - Hispanic Studies II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 115 , SPAN 130 , or by placement) The course refines oral abilities introduced in SPAN 115  or SPAN 130 , developing language skills related to speaking and listening up to a novice low-mid proficiency (cf. ACTFL) necessary for communicating in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures. It also continues exposing students to the many facets of Hispanic cultures in general. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    SPAN 211 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in North America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 , or by placement) The course focuses on the refinement of oral abilities addressed in SPAN 210 and promotes the development of speaking and listening skills at the novice high level of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). It emphasizes communication in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures, with a special focus on the many facets of Hispanic cultures in North America. Required for work in upper-level language and culture courses. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 235 - Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) This course provides an introduction to Hispanic Linguistics and establishes the basis for future application of linguistic principles. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 255 - Spanish Conversation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Develops an intermediate proficiency in Spanish oral skills and an appreciation of Hispanic cultures through contact with materials taken from original sources. Emphasis on the improvement and refinement of pronunciation skills. Listening and discussion of a variety of materials of appropriate difficulty. S.
  
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    SPAN 315 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in South America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) The course focuses on the grammar review and writing practice and promotes the development of speaking and listening skills at the intermediate low level of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). It emphasizes communication in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures, with a special focus on the many facets of Hispanic cultures in South America. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 320 - Spanish for the Professions (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Study of the applied nature of the language focusing on the cultural aspects and specialized vocabulary of a given professional field. Emphasis on developing skills to ask and answer questions relating to a particular professional field, drafting relevant documents, and describing events that may arise in the practice of the profession. The following are among the possible professional fields on which the course will focus: a) Spanish for Business; b) Spanish for Health Professions; c) Spanish for Public Safety; d) Spanish for the Travel and Tourism Industry.
  
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    SPAN 321 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in Central America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) The course focuses on the refinement of oral abilities addressed in SPAN 315  and promotes the development of speaking and listening skills at the intermediate mid proficiency, according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). It emphasizes communication in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures, with a special focus on the many facets of Hispanic cultures in Central America. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 322 - Latin American Literature in Translation (3 credits)


    (=ENGL 322 ) (Prereq: for Spanish credit: SPAN 210 ) Selected readings of Latin American Literature in translation. Students write primarily critical essays. All readings are in English.
  
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    SPAN 323 - Spanish for Business and Tourism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) This course provides students with linguistic skills necessary to discuss business concepts and the tourism industry in Spanish. Emphasis is placed on developing the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in the context of business situations. Special consideration is devoted to acquiring an appreciation and understanding of Hispanic culture in the business world.
  
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    SPAN 326 - Cuban Literature in Translation (1 to 3 credits)


    (=LATS 326 ) (Prereq: SPAN 130  and permission of the instructor) (Coreq: Travel/study in Cuba) Selected readings in Cuban literature in translation. Students will read, research and write on Cuban literature, society and culture. A non-refundable deposit is required upon registration.
  
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    SPAN 330 - Approaches to Hispanic Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Introductory exploration of selected topics in language, literature and culture. Topics are chosen for their significance and impact on Hispanic cultures. Course taught in Spanish. This course may be repeated once for credit under different topics. Su.
  
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    SPAN 333 - Topics in Language, Literature, and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Selective study of topics in the language, literature, and culture of Latin America and Spain. Course format includes reading assignments, lectures, discussion, oral and written reports. Topics vary.
  
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    SPAN 340 - Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) A study of the historical development and various cultural manifestations of the Spanish, Latin American, and contemporary Hispanic civilization.
  
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    SPAN 345 - Spanish through Art (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) A select study of the most relevant socio-historical and cultural periods of Spain and Latin America as represented in painting masterpieces from the Baroque period to the contemporary era. Class format includes intensive conversations and continued development of reading and writing skills. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish. F.
  
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    SPAN 350 - Spanish Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Approval from the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies faculty) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment.
  
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    SPAN 355 - Spanish Morphology and Syntax (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 235  or equivalent) The course examines the internal structure of words and the rules by which word formation takes place, and provides a thorough study of Spanish grammar from a formal perspective. It examines the relationship between syntax and morphology by considering the effects that some morphological processes have on syntax. It also considers the phrase structure properties of Spanish. F.
  
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    SPAN 360 - Studies in Hispanic Poetry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) Selected topics in Hispanic poetry. This course is designed to develop students’ appreciation of poetry and to develop critical approaches to poetic texts. Periods covered may include the following: Renaissance and Baroque Poetry of Spain, Modern Spanish Poetry, and Poetry of Latin America from Modernism to the present.
  
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    SPAN 380 - Studies in World Film (3 credits)


    This course is a survey of world film with an emphasis on Hispanic cinema. It provides a general introduction to contemporary film-critical discourses which are currently under the rubric of film semiotics. Key elements of the language of cinema are studied with the goal of developing both critical and creative skills. Taught in English.
  
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    SPAN 399 - Independent Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: a written contract between students and instructor for a special topic dealing with Spanish language or culture, and approved by the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts) May not be used to satisfy the Spanish Minor Core.
  
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    SPAN 410 - Spanish Peninsular Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 340 ) A survey of the major literary works of Spain from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century.
  
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    SPAN 411 - Spanish American Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 340 ) A survey of the major literary works of Spanish American from pre-Columbian times through the twentieth century.
  
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    SPAN 430 - Spanish Linguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 340 ) Study of modern Spanish with attention to the application of linguistic theory to the effective teaching of Spanish.
  
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    SPAN 431 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in Spain and the Caribbean (3 credits)


    (Writing Intensive) (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) The course refines oral abilities reviewed in SPAN 321 , developing language skills related to speaking and listening up to an intermediate high proficiency, according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), necessary for communicating in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures. It also continues exposing students to the many facets of Hispanic cultures in the Caribbean and Spain. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 435 - Spanish English Contrasts (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 355 ) This course offers insights into Spanish phonology, morphology, syntax and lexicon as seen through the eyes of an English-speaking learner of Spanish. It proposes an in-depth study of Spanish linguistic structures and its implications for language teaching and translation. S.
 

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