Oct 03, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Physics

  
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    PHYS 235 - Electric Circuits (3 credits)


    (=ENGR 235 ) (Prereq: PHYS 137  and MATH 160 , or PHYS 212 ) This course is an introduction to electrical circuit theory and its application to practical direct and alternating current circuits. Topics include: Kirchhoff’s laws, fundamental principles of network theorems, transient and steady-state response of RC, RL and RLC circuits by classical methods, time-domain and frequency-domain relationships, phasor analysis and power. F.
  
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    PHYS 250 - Communicating STEM (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to effective forms of communication in the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Students learn about available tools for researching and writing academic papers, the proper structure for a journal article, and the publication process. Students are also exposed to the various styles for delivering an oral presentation including effective strategies for each style. Time is also spent on learning best practices for designing and presenting a scholarly poster. S.
  
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    PHYS 301 - Analytical Mechanics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 , and MATH 320  or PHYS 310 ) A rigorous treatment of classical mechanics, including conservation of energy and momentum, rotating reference frames, physics of continuous media and wave motion. F.
  
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    PHYS 302 - Electricity and Magnetism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 214 , and MATH 260  or PHYS 310 ) A more advanced treatment of the concepts of electricity and magnetism. Electrostatics, magnetostatics, dielectrics, Maxwell’s Equations with applications, radiation, reflection, and dispersion. S.
  
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    PHYS 303 - Quantum Mechanics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 214 ) (Coreq: MATH 320 ) Principles of quantum mechanics, including operators in Hilbert space, matrix mechanics, angular momentum, spin, perturbation theory, and application. F.
  
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    PHYS 310 - Mathematical Methods in Physics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 , and MATH 161 ) Physics applications of vector calculus, infinite series, complex analysis, differential equations, orthogonal functions, integral equations, linear algebra, and calculus of variations. S.
  
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    PHYS 321 - Electronics (3 credits)


    (ENGR 321 ) (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 214 ) A lab-based class for the study of both analog and digital circuit elements, solid state devices, integrated circuits, and basic circuit design. S.
  
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    PHYS 330 - Computer Interfacing and Instrumentation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 214 , and MATH 161 ) Applications of computers as integrated to scientific instruments, with emphasis on hardware and instrumentation, online data acquisition, and computer control of experiments. Students learn and use Labview to interface equipment and control experiments. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 340 - Intermediate Astronomy (3 credits)


    Survey of diverse astronomical objects and the physical principles used in modeling them. Emphasis is placed on the observational basis and foundations of astrophysics. Stellar magnitudes, colors and spectra, the HR diagram, solar and stellar activity, binary stars, and stellar evolution will be examined.
  
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    PHYS 341 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 161 , PHYS 214 , and PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 ) An introduction to thermal physics and statistical mechanics, covering entropy, heat, temperature, the Carnot Cycle, free energy, thermodynamic potential, phase equilibria, and the laws of thermodynamics. The connection between the interactions of single particles and the bulk properties of matter will be developed. S.
  
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    PHYS 351 - Computational Methods in Physics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 214 ) This course introduces students to the computational tools that physicists routinely use to analyze and to codify the foundational principles of physics. By the end of the semester a student completing this course is able to perform order-of-magnitude calculations; design and write computer programs that simulate physical systems described by multiple variables; and analyze a set of noisy data. The communication and synthesis of scientific knowledge is highlighted throughout the course via formal written reports that describe the theoretical analysis of a physical system. F.
  
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    PHYS 352 - Experimental Methods in Physics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 ) This course focuses on the processes and methods in experimental physics. In particular, students acquire experimental data, recognize patterns and trends within the experimental data, develop models for physical processes, and fit these models to data. Observation, testing, and application experiments are discussed, and students are assessed on their ability to design and conduct these types of experiments. Students also study and apply topics in error analysis, such as the proper reporting of uncertainties, error propagation, statistical analysis, and normal distributions. The communication and synthesis of scientific knowledge is highlighted throughout the course via formal written reports on experimental design and results. F.
  
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    PHYS 398 - Physics Seminar (1 credit)


    (=ENGR 398 ) This course focuses on the presentation and discussion of current research topics and other issues of importance in physics or related fields. S.
  
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    PHYS 399 Q* - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and approved contract) Directed study and/or research on specific topic. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHYS 402 - Electricity and Magnetism II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 302  or permission of the instructor) The second of a two-semester sequence in an intermediate study of electricity and magnetism. Electromagnetic waves, potentials and fields of moving charges, radiation, and special relativity are covered. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHYS 410 - Optics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 214 ) A study of the topics of the wave nature of light, geometrical optics, polarization, diffraction, interference and other optical phenomena, and methods of optical design. S.
  
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    PHYS 420 - Solid State Physics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 161 , PHYS 214 , and PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 ) A study of the fundamental properties of solids, especially semi-conductors and metals, such as structure, conductivity, and models of solids. Applications of quantum and statistical mechanics to the thermal and electrical properties of various types of solids are made. F.
  
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    PHYS 430 - Fluid Mechanics (3 credits)


    (=ENGR 430 ) (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 ) (Coreq: MATH 320 ) This course offers a comprehensive examination of the development of the Navier-Stokes equation in fluid motion. At the instructor’s discretion, topics include theorems of energy, potential flow, elements of airfoil theory, and similarity parameters as well as the introduction to environmental fluid dynamics. F, alternate years.
  
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    PHYS 431 - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 , and MATH 161 ) Development of the fundamental fluid dynamics used in analyzing and interpreting flows in the ocean and atmosphere. Fundamentals of vorticity dynamics and geostrophy, wave dynamics at various scales, general circulation, vorticity, numerical modeling, and dynamics of other planets. F, alternate years.
  
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    PHYS 431L - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (1 credit)


    This laboratory will concentrate on acquiring and processing atmospheric and oceanic data, in support of the concepts and applications studies in the lecture. F, alternate years.
  
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    PHYS 432 - Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 ) Detection and mapping of land and ocean resources with optical, infrared and microwave sensors. Digital analysis of images using multispectral and spatial analysis techniques and correlation with ground/ship data. Application to oceanography, coastal processes, geology, land use, geography, agriculture, climate and pollution studies. S, alternate years.
  
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    PHYS 432L - Remote Sensing of the Environment Laboratory (1 credit)


    Students will learn to acquire, process and analyze digital remote sensing data from a variety of sources, using current computer technology. Students will also learn to take field measurements of spectral signatures to develop algorithms and to ground-truth remotely acquired data. S, alternate years.
  
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    PHYS 434 - Atmospheric Physics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 , and MATH 260 ) Principles of fluid dynamics, thermo-dynamics and mathematics are used to develop an understanding of the atmosphere’s dynamic (mid-latitude weather systems to planetary scale motions), radiative processes, and general circulation. Focus will also be placed on current problems in Atmospheric Science through reading and reviewing current publications. S, alternate years.
  
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    PHYS 450 - Radiation Detection and Measurement (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 214  and permission of the instructor) A course in the fundamentals of radiation detection and measurement covering topics including nuclear instability, radioactive sources, interaction of radiation with matter, processing of radiation-induced signals, biological effects of radiation, dosimetry, attenuation of charged particles, gamma rays and neutrons and effectiveness of shielding methods. S.
  
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    PHYS 450L - Radiation Detection and Measurement Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: PHYS 450  and permission of the instructor) A laboratory course demonstrating the fundamentals of radiation detection, radioactive sources, interaction of radiation with matter, processing of radiation-induced signals, dosimetry, spectroscopy and attenuation of charged particles, gamma rays and neutrons and effectiveness of shielding methods.  Su.
  
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    PHYS 499 Q - Applied Physics Capstone (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior standing or permission of the instructor) This course is a capstone experience for applied physics majors and serves to integrate the knowledge and skills that students have developed over a college career. Specifically, students will demonstrate throughout the course the ability to apply the principles, concepts, and processes of physics; communicate and synthesize scientific knowledge; identify and use appropriate tools to solve problems; and develop, test, analyze, and interpret models of physical systems. To accomplish this, each student will complete and report on an independent research project and solve a series of open-ended problems in the context of applied physics. F, S.

Politics

  
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    POLI 101 - Introduction to World Politics (3 credits)


    (=POLI 101H ) An introduction to global politics connecting the ideas, cultures, and policies of individual countries to the international level. Students will examine conflict and cooperation on the planet in the areas of security, the environment, economic development, financial institutions, and human rights toward a better understanding of global citizenship in the 21st Century. F, S.
  
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    POLI 110 - The American Criminal Justice System (3 credits)


    An introduction to the structure of the law enforcement systems in the United States, from the local and state levels to the federal level. A consideration of the principal issues in law enforcement: arms control, internal security, organized crime and other problems of criminality.
  
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    POLI 200 - Introduction to Political Science (3 credits)


    An introduction to the discipline of political science with an emphasis on researching, writing, and communicating orally.
  
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    POLI 201 - Introduction to American Government (3 credits)


    (=POLI 201H ) An introduction to the national institutions and political processes of American government. Students will examine the formation, development, organization, and powers of national institutions; the interaction between political processes and political behavior; the development of civil rights and civil liberties; and the policy process. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 205 - Introductory Statistics for the Political and Social Sciences (3 credits)


    An introduction to the application of statistical analysis in contemporary political and social science. Particular attention will paid to the use of quantitative methods in the study of public opinion, voting behavior, public policy, and other subject areas. Topics include: measurement theory, measures of central tendency, dispersion, probability, sampling distributions, correlation, and hypothesis testing with bivariate and multivariate models. F, S.
  
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    POLI 300 - Introduction to Political Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 200  or permission of the instructor) A survey of the major themes and the great ideas in the history of political theory. The student will acquire a broad understanding of the history of political thought from its origins in classical political philosophy and its development in modern and contemporary political theory. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 302 - Thucydides: Empire and Warfare (3 credits)


    A study of just war theory and various theories of international relations, through the lens of Thucydides’ seminal work History of the Peloponnesian War. Students will learn about Thucydides’ work as the first political historian, and how his though applies to contemporary issues of international politics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    POLI 303 - American Government Through Literature and Film (3 credits)


    A survey of the various actors, institutions, and processes in the American political system by the use of fiction (motion pictures, novels, and plays). The roles of legislators, the judiciary, chief executives, and the press at the national, state, and local levels of government are included.
  
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    POLI 304 - Latin America Through Film (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) An examination of major topics in Latin American civilization through lecture, reading and writing, and the viewing and critical analysis of feature-length film.
  
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    POLI 305 - Introduction to Empirical Political Inquiry (3 credits)


    An introduction to modern empirical methodology in political inquiry. A survey of the theoretical foundations of the modern quantitative approach to political inquiry; an introduction to theory building, data gathering, data analysis, data evaluation, and to the writing of a written report. S.
  
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    POLI 306 - American Law through Literature and Film (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A survey of American law and the American legal system through the use of fiction (movies, novels, and plays). Emphasis will be placed on works highlighting different aspects of, and actors in, the judicial process, as well as works highlighting courts as forums for the dispensation of justice in the United States. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    POLI 307 - The Scope of American Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 200  and POLI 201 ; or permission of the instructor) An in-depth exploration of the two major fields of study in American politics: political institutions and political behavior. Topics covered include the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government in addition to political parties, voting behavior, public opinion, and interest groups. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 309 - African-American Political Thought (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A survey of the issues and major figures in the African-American political tradition. Primary writings of selected thinkers, statesmen, or activists such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X will be the major focus of the course.
  
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    POLI 311 - Introduction to Game Theory (3 credits)


    Game theory is a theory of decision-making in situations where payoffs to agents depend on the behavior of other agents. It typically involves the analysis of conflict, cooperation, and communication. In recent years, game theory has been widely applied in the analysis of economic and political issues. This course will offer an introduction to basic concepts, methods, and application of game theory. It also advances students’ ability to think strategically in interactive situations. S.
  
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    POLI 315 - International Relations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) International political behavior and institutions.
  
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    POLI 316 - Comparative Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) Comparative approaches to political systems, behavior and institutions.
  
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    POLI 318 - International Political Economy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) Examines the interaction between international politics and international economics.
  
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    POLI 319 - Introduction to European Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A survey of political systems, economy, society, and culture of the major European countries in a comparative perspective. Special emphasis is placed on common governance in Europe, and challenges facing the region in the era of globalization. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 320 - Introduction to Latin American Civilization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A survey of Latin American civilization from earliest times through the wars for independence.
  
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    POLI 321 - State and Society in Modern Latin America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A survey of social, economic, political, and cultural development in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  
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    POLI 326 - Politics and Government of Contemporary Cuba (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101 ) (Coreq: Travel/study in Cuba) A writing/research seminar in which students write on a selected topic in contemporary Cuban politics. Travel to Cuba is required. A non-refundable deposit and instructor’s permission are required upon registration.
  
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    POLI 327 - Women in the Middle East (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course examines women and gender relations in early Islam and the post-colonial era focusing on recent developments of the status of women in the Middle East. Based on the analysis of theories of patriarchy, socialization, Feminism/Islamic Feminism and of “Orientalism,” the course aims to explore the contemporary struggle of women in the Middle East for economic, political, and civic equality.
  
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    POLI 328 - Political Islam (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course will offer students an opportunity to analyze and discuss some of the most significant issues of political Islam in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will analyze the emergence of Islam as a political force and explore how Islam has been used as a tool to both legitimatize governmental power and challenge the legitimacy of existing systems.
  
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    POLI 329 - Comparative Politics of the Middle East (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course examines the domestic politics of various Middle Eastern countries. It focuses on issues of citizenship, the process of democratization, social and political movements, role of opposition; and the impact of Western ideologies, militarism, conflict and foreign policy.
  
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    POLI 330 - Introduction to the Middle East (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) An introductory survey of the Middle East including a study of the Islamic religion, the historical and geographical background of the region, the problems of Arab North Africa, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the petroleum issue, instability in the Persian Gulf, and the problem of violent religious extremism.
  
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    POLI 331 - The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A consideration of the historical background and contemporary status of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, covering the geographic, cultural, religious, economic, and political aspect of the crisis.
  
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    POLI 332 - Conflict in the Persian Gulf (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course examines the political, cultural, economic and military aspects of the Persian Gulf Region with particular attention to problems in Iran, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia. The region’s status as a major source of crude oil will also be examined.
  
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    POLI 333 - Islam and World Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) An examination of the Islamic religion as it relates to Middle Eastern and world politics. Topics include the Sunni-Shi’ite divide, traditionalist or fundamentalist variants of Islam, political movements challenging regional governments, and violent groups like al-Qaeda, Iraqi insurgent groups, and the Taliban.
  
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    POLI 334 - East Asian Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101 ) An introduction to how changes in the post-WWII international political system have influenced the strategic, political, and economic situations in East Asia.
  
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    POLI 335 - Chinese Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A study of the politics of mainland China with an emphasis on the politics of the post-Mao era (after 1978).
  
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    POLI 336 - Chinese Foreign Policy and US-Chinese Relations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course consists of two major parts. The first part focuses on the development of the U.S.-Chinese relations in the past century. The second part surveys major topics on China’s foreign policy. We also discuss basic theories and methods of foreign policy analysis. Finally students may use the knowledge to conduct independent research on a topic on Chinese foreign policy or U.S.-Chinese relations. F, odd years.
  
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    POLI 337 - Introduction to Islamist Extremism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or RELG 322 ) Through careful readings of the works of some of the most prominent Islamist thinkers of the 20th century and today, this course will examine the conditions that give rise to Islamism, Jihadi violence, and terrorism. The course will additionally discuss the circumstances behind the rise of the largest Jihadi groups, namely ISIS, and these groups’ influences on global politics. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 338 - Introduction to Political Linguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) An introductory survey of the role played in contemporary world politics by the multi-lingual character of individual countries and the global community, with special focus on the connection between languages and conflict.
  
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    POLI 339 - Diplomacy (3 credits)


    An examination of the role of diplomacy in advancing national interest, with a particular emphasis on the role of the diplomat.
  
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    POLI 340 - International Negotiations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A study of the theory and practice of international negotiation. Special emphasis will be paid to the various styles of decision making and negotiation associated with different cultures and countries. In addition, the various stages of the negotiation process will be analyzed.
  
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    POLI 341 - Contemporary American Foreign Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A historical and political analysis of twentieth century American foreign policy.
  
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    POLI 342 - European Union Institutions and Policymaking (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101 ) Surveys the origins, institutional development and functioning of the European Union (EU) - a key player in global coordination and governance in the areas of security, economics, development, environment, and human rights. Special emphasis is placed on governance and policy making in the European Union, its role in the international arena and challenges facing the EU in the 21st century. F, S.
  
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    POLI 344 - Politics and Society in the United Kingdom (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A consideration of political and social structures in England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland (Ulster).
  
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    POLI 345 - Politics and Governments of the Middle East (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) Politics, religion, and conflict in the contemporary Middle East, with emphasis upon the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the Persian Gulf situation.
  
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    POLI 346 - Contemporary African Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course introduces students to the contemporary political issues of the African continent. It provides understanding(s) of pre-colonial and contemporary governance structures, effects of colonialism, the post-colonial state - the military in politics, “democratization” and Africa in the global economy. Emphasis is also placed on several key issues and analytical approaches to the study of Africa e.g. feminist, environmentalism and modernization theories of conflict and change.
  
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    POLI 347 - Africa in a Global Economy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course explores Africa’s position and role within the global political-economy. Also, it looks at how sub-Saharan African countries have fared within the global economic system of exchange, and the impact that international policies have had in structuring state economic options and decisions. The course will also examine the relationship(s) between domestic African economies and the global economy as related to inequality and political conflict. F, S.
  
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    POLI 348 - Introduction to Africa (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This is a course designed to introduce students to the continent of Africa. It focuses on African geography and environment, political and economic histories, and its rich and varied cultures. The course approaches the study of the continent from a historical, interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. F, S.
  
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    POLI 349 - Comparative African Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course explores the development of various political systems in Africa. It attempts to compare and draw from critical case studies from different regions/countries on the African continent. F, S.
  
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    POLI 353 - Comparative Security Issues (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course will engage students in the comparative analysis of security issues confronting both developing and developed states in the international community. It explores core questions about security in the contemporary international system, and also, the relationship among national, international and human security. F, S.
  
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    POLI 355 - Foreign Policy Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) An introduction to basic theories, models and typical cases of foreign policy decision making.
  
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    POLI 360 - American Political Parties (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A survey of the role of political parties in the American political system. Following an examination of the historical evolution of party systems in the United States, primary attention is given to three aspects of contemporary political parties: the parties as an organization, the party as an electorate, and the party as a governing elite.
  
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    POLI 361 - American Politics: Interest Groups (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) An examination of the role of interest groups in the operation of the American political system, with a particular emphasis on pluralist and elitist theories of democracy.
  
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    POLI 362 - Mass Media and American Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) The development and nature of the mass media; the influence of the media on American culture, politics, and government.
  
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    POLI 363 - Southern Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) Selected political patterns and trends in the eleven states of the American South, focusing on the post-1950 period.
  
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    POLI 365 - State Government (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of state-federal relations, relations among states, state constitutions, and the structure and functions of the three branches of government. Emphasis is given to South Carolina.
  
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    POLI 366 - Public Opinion (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course will survey important topics in American public opinion. Topics covered will include the formation of opinions, political socialization, how to read and interpret political polls, and how public opinion influences the course of politics in this country.
  
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    POLI 367 Q* - Political Communication (3 credits)


    (=COMM 367 ) (Prereq: POLI 201  or COMM 140 ) Political communication is an exchange of information between citizens and their governments. This course will provide students the knowledge to understand political communication in the scholarly community and apply their skills in the creation of political communication in the public sphere. This course can serve both the student who wants to go into politics and the student who wants to understand more about public opinion, the history of political communication, and how it is used in U.S. politics. This course is cross-listed with COMM 367. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    POLI 368 Q* - Campaigns and Elections (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course provides an overview of the electoral process in America. We approach this topic by examining the behavior and actions of candidates and their campaign apparatus, the administration of elections by public officials, voting behavior and participation by citizens, and current trends in academic research. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 369 - Political Psychology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course covers selected topics in political psychology. It introduces basic concepts related to the study of psychology before turning to an examination of competing theories within the field of political psychology. Topics of study include psychobiography, personality, cognition, affect, and neuropolitics. We end the semester by applying these approaches to the study of political behavior – specifically participation, voting, and communication. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 370 - Introduction to Public Administration (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the basic principles and theory of administrative structure, responsibility, and control in relation to governmental management.
  
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    POLI 371 - Public Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction to the nature of public policy in the U.S. Topics include theories and models of policy making, policy formation and implementation by political institutions, and the formation of the policy agenda. A significant focus is placed on the content and design of policy in selected areas, including health, education, welfare, criminal justice, and environmental policy.
  
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    POLI 372 Q* - Women and Public Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course examines the expanding role of women in political life. Students will study women as emerging political players in society, with a particular focus on strategies for gaining political power, the evolution of public policies that affect the lives and opportunities of women, and the present political status of women in the U.S. Some sections of this class will be offered as experiential learning. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 375 - Citizenship, Government, and the Economy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of the most influential theories of citizenship and political economy. Students will study theories of citizenship, theories of rights and liberties, and the competing conceptions of the proper relationship between government and the economy. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    POLI 376 - The Bureaucracy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A study of how the branches of government function (political control, the political-bureaucratic adaptation, bureaucratic accountability, reasoning, their clients, networks) and what government agencies do and why they do it. Interrelationships among the various entities in government will be explored through case studies.
  
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    POLI 396 - Explorations in Political Science (1 to 4 credits)


    An in-depth exploration of topics in political science, including topics in American politics, international relations, comparative politics, public policy and administration, and political theory. This course may be repeated for up to nine credit hours under different topics. F, S.
  
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    POLI 397 Q - Dyer Institute Fellowship (0-3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) The Edgar Dyer Institute for Leadership and Public Policy’s mission is to engage students in active learning opportunities where they may gain knowledge in various areas of policy research. The institute wishes to bring together a group of Coastal Carolina University students from all colleges and varying degree fields to participate in the Policy Fellowship Program. The goal of the program is to provide students with experience that will connect academic theory to practice, as well as foster the importance of civic-minded citizens. Over the course of the semester, Dyer Fellows enrolled in POLI 397Q will develop a fully formed research paper on a public policy topic of their interest. Additionally, students will receive specific training on how to craft supplemental resources, including a policy brief, survey tool and a press release. Acceptance into the Dyer Fellows Program is a requirement for admission into this course. F, S.
  
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    POLI 399 Q* - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Written contract between the student and the instructor, approved by the associate dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts) This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    POLI 401 - Classical Political Philosophy (3 credits)


    A study of classical political philosophy. Students will read texts from ancient Greece and Rome, with an emphasis on understanding the universality of political questions.
  
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    POLI 402 - Medieval Political Philosophy (3 credits)


    A study of political thinkers from the medieval period. Texts will be drawn from the medieval Christian, Jewish, and Islamic traditions.
  
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    POLI 403 - History of Political Thought III (3 credits)


    A study of the history of political thought from Hobbes through Rousseau.
  
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    POLI 404 - Contemporary Issues in Political Theory (3 credits)


    A study of the most influential political thinkers of the 19th-20th centuries. Students will learn about the competing ideologies and “-isms” of the past two centuries, as well as contemporary philosophical challenges to modern political society. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    POLI 406 - American Political Thought (3 credits)


    An analysis of the foundation and development of American politics from the early colonial period through current political debates. Emphasis will be placed on American theories of rights, liberties, citizenship, and constitutionalism. F, even years.
  
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    POLI 407 - Reflections on Power (3 credits)


    A study of the political philosophies of traditionally underrepresented groups in the Western canon. Students will study various texts from African-American political thought, Far Eastern and Near Eastern political theory, feminist political thought, and gender theory. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    POLI 408 - Utopian Political Thought (3 credits)


    A study of the utopias and dystopias outlined by political thinkers throughout the ages. Students will study fictional societies ranging from Plato’s Republic to contemporary dystopian fiction. This course will examine the tension between theories of progress and theories of individual rights. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    POLI 410 Q - International Organizations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course surveys the international organizations that are key players in global coordination and conflict in the areas of security, economics, development, human rights, and the environment. It includes an examination of intergovernmental organizations, such as the United Nations and the European Union, as well as nongovernmental organizations. This course is also a prerequisite for participation in the Model United Nations.
  
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    POLI 411 - Empirical Analysis of International Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 205 , POLI 311 , or POLI 315 ; or permission of the instructor) This course provides an overview of the primary empirical and analytical approaches in the study of international politics. Students will learn how to apply simple analytic and empirical tools (including spatial models, the median voter theorem, win sets, expected utility theory, noncooperative game theory, and statistical models) to some significant problems in the current world (including international wars, foreign policy analysis, terrorism, military intervention, foreign aid, international trade, and international organizations). F, S, May, Su.
  
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    POLI 420 - Global Environmental Politics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) A comparative study of environmental politics and policy in industrialized countries (with special attention to the U.S.) and developing countries.
  
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    POLI 421 Q - Sustainable Development (3 credits)


    (=UNIV 421 ) This class examines important questions surrounding the term “sustainable development” and its history through an analysis of the political economy, institutions, and cultural/social impacts of living in a sustainable manner and/or living unsustainably. F, S.
  
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    POLI 422 - Energy Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course introduces students to global energy challenges in the context of shifting agendas, focusing on energy security, development, and sustainability. The course discusses the existing spectrum of institutional arrangements that aim to govern global energy and evaluates various energy policies in regional and global contexts. F, S, Su.
 

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