Jan 30, 2023  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Intelligence and National Securities Studies

  
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    INTEL 441 - Intelligence in the Cold War (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) For nearly half a century, the world was engulfed in what is often described as the most permeating political rivalry of modern times. Far from being simply a prolonged tactical standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union, the Cold War shaped the politics and ideology of an entire era. It also molded the institutional character and operational outlook of intelligence institutions in both East and West. This course traces the impact of the Cold War on contemporary aspects of intelligence, by exploring its role in some of the most critical flashpoints of the era and analyzing classic cases of international espionage that took place in the context of that tumultuous period. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 450 Q - National Intelligence Studies (NIS) in Washington, D.C. (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Permission of the instructor) This course is an experiential learning “study away” program. The course provides students an opportunity to learn about the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) by visiting a number of IC member agencies and organizations. Students gain first-hand knowledge of the organization, structure, and operation of the IC agencies and their role in providing national intelligence products to senior policy makers in the U.S. Government. Students also visit think tanks, universities, and meet with non-governmental organizations and members of Congress in order to learn about how intelligence agencies and other institutions support decision-makers implementing national security policy. Students also research, write, and present a simulated National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) during the program to intelligence instructors in the IC. Su.
  
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    INTEL 451 Q - Applied Intelligence Analysis (0 to 1 credit)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) This course offers hands-on familiarity with intelligence-briefing conventions for members of the Chanticleer Intelligence Brief (CIB) student group. Students acquire an experiential understanding of open-source intelligence collection, production and delivery, centering on their own regional- or issue-based concentration. This one-credit course may be taken for zero credit with the instructor’s approval. It may also be repeated for up to eight credits, three of which may be counted toward the Intelligence and National Security Studies major or minor. F, S.
  
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    INTEL 491 - Topics in Intelligence and Security Studies (3 credits)


    Reading and research on selected subjects in intelligence and security studies. Open to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit under different topics. (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Reading and research on selected subjects in intelligence and security studies. Open to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 494 - Intelligence and National Security Studies Capstone (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of INTEL 200 , INTEL 301 , INTEL 310 , INTEL 311 , INTEL 312 , and 90 credit hours; or permission of the instructor) This course is designed to be a culminating experience in the study of intelligence and national security studies at the undergraduate level. Beyond a study of the contemporary issues and challenges in the field, students will utilize their accumulated knowledge and skills in the production and presentation of a piece of original research. F, S.
  
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    INTEL 495 - Internship in Intelligence and Security Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) The purpose of the internship is to provide students with practical training and experience in security-related work and to introduce them to local, regional and national employers in the field. Students may do an internship for academic credit of three 3 hours and must work at least 120 hours at an organization during the semester registered. Grades are determined by a combination of the evaluation of the internship performance by the facility supervisor and faculty supervisor. Requirements are specifically stated in a contract to be signed by the student, faculty supervisor and facility supervisor. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 496 - Honors Directed Research (3 credits)


    Course Restriction(s): course enrollment is limited to students pursing Honors recognition as Intelligence and National Security Studies majors. (Prereq: HONR 101 ; one 300 level HONR course, INTEL 300  for honors; and permission of the instructor) This course is the first of a two-part requirement to earn honors recognition for the undergraduate Intelligence and National Security degree program. Taken in the first term, this is an Honors Directed Research course which prepares the student for completing the Honors Thesis in the next term. The course involves directed research project development, methodology, research design, thesis statement, and literature review. At the completion of the course, the student turns in a Thesis Prospectus as well as provides a research presentation to faculty members. F.
  
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    INTEL 497 - Honors Senior Thesis (3 credits)


    Course Restriction(s): course enrollment is limited to students pursing Honors recognition as Intelligence and National Security Studies majors. (Prereq: HONR 101 ; one 300 level HONR course, INTEL 300  for honors; INTEL 496 ; and permission of the instructor) This course is the second of a two-part requirement to earn honors recognition for the undergraduate Intelligence and National Security degree program. Taken in the second term, this is an Honors Senior Thesis course which culminates the student’s honors thesis requirement. The course involves the completion of a directed research project, including all components of the Thesis Prospectus developed in the previous term, with a complete bibliography. The Final Thesis must reflect an appropriate level of scholarship and advanced writing proficiency to be accepted as fulfilling the Honors Senior Thesis requirement. At the completion of the course, the student turns in a Final Honors Senior Thesis as well as provides a research presentation to faculty members. S.
  
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    INTEL 498 - Variable Credit Internship (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor or minimum GPA of 3.0) This course is designed to facilitate off-campus, semester-long internships for students interested in the practice of intelligence and security studies. It is designed to be variable credit based on the needs of the student. F, S, Su.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    IDS 190 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Humanistic Thought (3 credits)


    This course uses an interdisciplinary cultural studies approach to explore a specific topic or issue. Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary perspectives in the humanities and articulate how multiple perspectives can lead to a more complex understanding of an issue. Topics will change depending on instructor, but may include media and climate change, the cultural studies of food, and feminist science studies. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.
  
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    IDS 191 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human and Social Behavior (3 credits)


    This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore special topics or issues related to the study of human behavior, either within individuals or among various groups of people. This course will facilitate critical thinking and the evaluation of various ideas and perspectives in order to better understand social influences and cultural beliefs impacting the world around us. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.
  
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    IDS 302 - Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    This course is an interdisciplinary examination of selected themes relating to topics involving multiple approaches to learning and cultural analysis. This course may be applied to the Interdisciplinary Studies major only one time. Offered as needed.
  
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    IDS 310 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    This course examines both theoretical approaches and practical applications of interdisciplinarity in today’s world, with special emphasis on the interdisciplinary research process. F, S.
  
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    IDS 311 - Interdisciplinary Program Planning Workshop (1 credit)


    (Coreq: IDS 310  must be either completed with a ‘C’ or better or taken concurrently with IDS 311) This one-credit workshop allows students to work closely with an IDS faculty member or adviser to develop their interdisciplinary program of study. Students explore their educational and career goals, along with reviewing their previous coursework, to create an individualized program of study that best suits their interests and aspirations. At the end of the course, students submit their program of study to the chair of IDS.  F, S.
  
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    IDS 333 - Interdisciplinary Nature of Careers (3 credits)


    (=UNIV 333 ) IDS/UNIV 333  will provide the student the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of operating in a consumer based economy. It will expose the student to a further understanding of the overall business environment and explore the student’s role as employee/ employer and consumer. The topics covered in the course will include a brief overview organizational, management and motivational theory, personal ethics as it applies to decision making, selecting a major and planning a career, managing change in organizations and on an individual level, innovation and creativity affecting all individuals in all organizations. F, S.
  
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    IDS 380 - Signs Among Us: The Semiotics of Culture (3 credits)


    (=COMM 380 ) A study of the signs and sign systems produced, exchanged and interpreted in contemporary culture. From toys to cuisine, from comics to video games, from plastic to astrology, the course offers critical approaches to the multiple spheres of meaning in which we move. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    IDS 385 - ‘Screens’: Communication Systems in Global Media (3 credits)


    (=CLC 385 ) Approaches to the properties and interaction of communication systems in the phenomenon of ‘screens’ — devices with global connectivity that are rapidly transforming interpersonal and intercultural communication. The course considers the origins, elements and functions of various kinds of intermodal communication as well as their scope (possibilities and limits). Topics discussed may include principles of information theory, integrated theory of communication, the notion of interface, and aspects of the semiotics of culture. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    IDS 390 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of ENGL 101  or equivalent with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course introduces students to academic and interdisciplinary communication skills and gives each student a chance to practice those skills. The course prepares students to write for an academic audience and emphasizes elements of academic discourse across the disciplines. The course also covers strategies for multi-modal communication (including audio and visual) in the academic environment and provides opportunities to practice these modes of communication. The course prepares students to communicate clearly and effectively to academic audiences across the disciplines. F, S.
  
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    IDS 398 - Research Methods in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    (Restricted to Interdisciplinary Studies Majors) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to principles and characteristics of approaches and methodologies relevant to research in Interdisciplinary Studies. Students will begin designing their capstone research project for IDS 499 .
  
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    IDS 399 - Directed Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: written contract between the professor and student and approved by the adviser and the dean of University College) Study of specific topics related to student’s proposed program of study as outlined in application for admission to IDS program. This course may be repeated under different topics.
  
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    IDS 495 Q - Experiential Internship (3 to 12 credits)


    The purpose of this experiential internship is designed to provide students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience that complements their interdisciplinary concentration. This course offers individuals educational experiences that bridge academic disciplines and the work place. The guided internship requires 120-480 hours of on-site work depending on the number of credits enrolled (3-12 credits). Students must work through the Internship Process established by the CCU Career Services Guidelines. This course is designed to be variable credit based on the needs of the student. Permission of adviser is necessary to enroll.
  
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    IDS 499 - Capstone Research Project in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: IDS 398 ) Capstone course required of all Interdisciplinary Studies students for graduation. Students plan and complete an original research project under the guidance and supervision of the instructor. The topic selected must be related to the student’s Interdisciplinary Studies area of emphasis. Seminar sessions focus on the principles, procedures, and problems of executing a senior-level research project. Students present project results in both written and oral form. F, S, Su.

International Engagement

  
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    INTL 301 Q - Global Ambassadors (0 credits)


    The interrelation of our myriad countries and cultures is more and more complicated but irrefutable and evolving. As a global society is best served by individuals who have a broad understanding of the world and their place in it, this course seeks to create and empower a group of dedicated student leaders as global ambassadors who will advocate for and promote global awareness and engagement programming in our community through campus engagement, action projects within the community, mentoring of fellow students, and integrated reflective learning. Pass/Fail grading only. This course may be repeated and students must apply for and be accepted to the course.
  
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    INTL 398 Q - International Experiential Engagement (0 credits)


    (Coreq: Participation in a Study Abroad Program) This course exposes students to learning about different cultures, social institutions and languages, as well as about themselves as a member of the global community through their personalized experience in participating in a study abroad program. Students participating in this course will explore their expectations and objectives for studying abroad before departure and complete post-reflection assignments assessing their expected versus actual learning upon completion of the program. This course may be repeated.

Italian

  
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    ITAL 110 - Introductory Italian (3 credits)


    For students with no or very limited background in Italian. Emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Italian through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Development of reading and writing skills.
  
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    ITAL 115 - Italian Studies I (5 credits)


    This class introduces students to the Italian language and the many facets of Italian cultures. This course also helps students develop the basic language skills of speaking, listening, and communicating in everyday situations in Italian cultures. As a hybrid course, three credit hours are delivered face-to-face and two hours via distance learning format. F, S.
  
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    ITAL 120 - Introductory Italian II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ITAL 110  or equivalent) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Italian through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Italian culture.
  
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    ITAL 210 - Intermediate Italian I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ITAL 115  or by placement exam) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework. F, S.
  
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    ITAL 350 - Italian Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Approval of the chair of the Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures) Language study abroad with instruction by native speaking instructors. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures is mandatory before enrollment. This class is repeatable for up to 6 credits.  F, S, Su.

Japanese

  
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    JAPN 110 - Introductory Japanese I (3 credits)


    For students with no or very limited background in Japanese. Emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture.
  
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    JAPN 120 - Introductory Japanese II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JAPN 110  or by placement) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture.
  
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    JAPN 130 - Introductory Japanese III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JAPN 120  or by placement) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture.
  
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    JAPN 350 - Japanese Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: JAPN 130 ) (Coreq: approval of the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program, students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment.

Journalism

  
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    JOUR 200 - Interactive Journalism Basics (3 credits)


    Covers the basics of journalism writing, video production and editing, and the AP Stylebook. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 201 - Foundations of Journalism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 ) Surveys the history and principles of American journalism, including its development, philosophical foundations, products, functions, social influences, current challenges, and directions for the future. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 304 - Writing for Interactive Journalism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 200  and JOUR 201 ) Builds on basic journalism writing skills acquired in JOUR 200  through the addition of specialty reporting skills and knowledge of interactive tools. Students practice and refine their writing skills and learn basic online reporting tools, including social media video shooting and editing. Classroom exercises emphasize proper grammar, quality writing, and multimedia storytelling. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 305 - Journalism News Writing and Reporting for Media (Print and Online) (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 304 ) Workshop on news media (both in paper and web format). Emphasis placed on writing news features, hard vs. soft news pieces and profiles for audiences of both newspapers and web news venues that include photography or video links. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 306 - Journalism Law and Ethics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 201 ) The legal history and philosophy of the media in light of the First Amendment, including discussion of libel and slander laws, shield laws, the Freedom of Information Act, privacy laws, and other issues affecting the rights and responsibilities of the media. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 307 - Copy Editing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 201  and JOUR 304 ) A rigorous workshop designed to develop editing skills. Students learn to catch fact, style, and grammar errors in copy; tighten and rewrite stories; create headlines; and manage deadlines. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 308 - Public Opinion and Propaganda (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 201 ) Offers historical analyses of propaganda as persuasive communication and explores how public opinion and propaganda impact each other and society. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 309 - Introduction to Public Relations and Integrated Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 201 ) A survey course on the concepts, strategies, and tactics of public relations as a career field and as it relates to journalism, advertising, and marketing. F, S,Su.
  
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    JOUR 310 - Writing for Broadcast (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 304 ) An introduction to broadcast media, as well as reporting. Students learn components of script writing, videotape editing, and the impact of broadcast. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 311 - Principles of Advertising (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 201 ) An overview of the broad field of advertising including concepts, strategies, and tactics. Informs students about the role of advertising in the American economy and the procedures involved in planning advertising campaigns. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 312 - Media Relations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 309  and JOUR 311 ) This course is a comprehensive study of media relations from the perspective of both proactive and reactive public relations practice. Particular emphasis is placed on writing for media, interacting with journalists, holding news conferences, understanding the role of the internet and interactive media, responding to organizational crises, and evaluating media relations effectiveness. Students gain proficiency in strategic writing and message composition and refine their skills in making oral presentations. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 314 Q - TV News Reporting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 304  and JOUR 310 ) Introduces students to television news reporting, with a focus on shooting, writing, and editing packages for broadcast. Students learn reporting judgment, practices, performance and technical skills through experiential projects. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 316 - Entertainment Media (3 credits)


    Examines the entertainment and network industry in Hollywood, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina and countries around the world, including television networks and movie studios. Topics and fields of study include casting, development, script coverage and script analysis. The course may cover location shooting; career choices in the industry; and comparison of biographies of writers, directors, and producers in the media entertainment industry. Students leave the course with a thorough understanding of the operation and management of the entertainment industry. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 317 - Television Studio Production (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 200  or JOUR 201  or permission of the instructor) Introduces students to the practice of television studio production with a special emphasis on producing and directing. Set designs and lighting plot plans are examined and determined for each production, whether for broadcast, cable, corporate media, community media productions, or not-for-profit organizations. Studio crew positions such as assistant director, floor director, camera operator, switcher, video recorder, audio engineer and graphics operator are rotated for each assignment to make students aware of their specific techniques. Projects are competed in a real-time environment. Post-production is not considered for this class. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 319 Q* - PR Practice and Events (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 309  and JOUR 311 ) This course is a study of event planning processes and special event planning in which students demonstrate the ability to connect theory with the practice of event planning in public relations. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 320 - Broadcast News (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 201 ) Students study the evolution and impact of broadcast news through critical examination of broadcast news coverage of key historical events. Pioneers in the field are also examined. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 324 - Media Planning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 309  and JOUR 311 ) This applied study of various media utilized in communication campaigns provides students with knowledge of the use of media, methods of determining appropriate audiences and media, and the skills and background required for media buying. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 326 - Brand Strategy and Advertising (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 309  and JOUR 311 ) An overview of brand strategy and advertising from a communication perspective, with emphasis on strategies for developing a brand and on skills needed to create advertisements. Topics covered include how to communicate a brand identity, advertising design and copywriting, and creating advertising executions. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 340 Q* - Radio News and Entertainment (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 200  or JOUR 201 ) Offers a broad survey of radio journalism and entertainment with some experiential learning. Students create and execute projects for on-air use. Students have the opportunity to use WCCU Radio, the department’s internet radio station, as a workshop for classwork and assignments. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 350 - Interactive Media and Society (3 credits)


    Offers an overview of interactive media, with an emphasis on participatory and social practices surrounding information and entertainment. The material covered reflects sustained trends in journalism, media and society. Topics may include the history and evolution of media from analog to digital formats; new models for journalism, news, creativity, production and consumption; and the outcomes, implications and consequences for culture and organizations. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 361 - News Feature Writing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 304 ) Students develop the skills needed to produce journalism feature articles appropriate for newspapers, magazines and online media. They research and write a variety of feature articles and review examples of excellent feature writing. They continue to improve their interviewing skills and work to become strong storytellers. Writing nonfiction articles as a freelance writer is also covered. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 365 - Women and Media (3 credits)


    A survey course about the history of women’s roles and contributions in media, employment, and media effects on women. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 366 - Sports Public Relations and Integrated Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 304  and JOUR 309 ; or JOUR 311  and JOUR 312  or JOUR 319 ) A broad survey of Sports Communication, including public relations and integrated communication research, training, planning, and execution. Useful for students entering Sports Communication career fields, as it may address topics common to this career field: publicity and media relations; event planning and execution; crisis management; reputation management; issue and policy communications; sponsor, stakeholder, and fan relations; corporate social responsibility; and sports-related social issues. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 419 - Strategic Communication Campaigns (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 309  and JOUR 311 ) An in-depth and applied study of the strategic communication process, including research, planning, implementation, and evaluation. Designed specifically to provide experiential learning opportunities as students work in teams to develop a campaign. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 433 Q - Teal Nation Communications (CCU Agency) (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 304  and JOUR 309 ; or JOUR 311  and JOUR 312  or JOUR 319 ) The course is the anchor for a student-run, full service agency providing integrated communications solutions for real clients. It is useful for students interested in entering communication fields, including agencies, internal and external corporate communications, government, and policy communications. The CCU Agency is student-led and client-driven, allowing students to both lead and be a part of a team, servicing the communication needs of various for-profit and not-for-profit clients. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 450 - Senior Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of 90 credit hours) A narrow, in-depth examination of a topic in media studies. The topic should be one either not covered in other courses or only surveyed. Course material focuses on relevant research and theory. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 489 - Journalism Special Topics Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 200  and JOUR 201 ; or permission of the instructor) Exact topics vary, but each is an interdisciplinary seminar emphasizing the relationships between journalism, mass media, and various aspects of society. The course may be repeated for Journalism elective credit. Topics may include broadcast radio, sports journalism, international journalism and web design. F, S, Su.
  
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    JOUR 495 Q - Journalism Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 201 , JOUR 304 , and either JOUR 305  or JOUR 310 ) Students receive professional experience and instruction in a substantial internship while working 10 hours per week with a local media organization. Contracts outlining content, supervision, and grading criteria must be approved in advance by the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours with permission from the instructor. F, S, Su.

Languages and Intercultural Studies

  
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    FREN 211 - Intermediate French Studies II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 210  or by placement) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level course work, with particular emphasis on reading. French 211 is a required course for the French Minor. F, S.
  
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    GERM 211 - Intermediate German Studies II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: GERM 210  or by placement) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level course work, with particular emphasis on reading. F, S.
  
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    ITAL 211 - Intermediate Italian Studies II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ITAL 210  or by placement) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework. F, S.
  
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    LIS 122 - Introduction to Intercultural Studies (3 credits)


    In this course students will have the opportunity to view and appreciate the distinctive character of different lands and peoples and acquire a basic intercultural communicative awareness that will prepare them for the study of a language. In addition, students will become familiar with scholarly approaches used in the discipline, which may include linguistics, second language acquisition, cultural studies, film studies, literary studies, interdisciplinary approaches, and/or pedagogy. Content will focus on a particular topic or theme within the context of non-English-speaking cultures. F, S.
  
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    LIS 301 - Intercultural Communication (3 credits)


    (=COMM 301 ) Focuses on the dynamics of how culture influences the communication process. Considers topics such as the roles of rituals and social dramas and provides an extensive and relevant discussion of different worldviews to gain “cultural competency.” F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    LIS 305 - French/Francophone Cultural History through Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ENGL 101 ) Selected translated readings of French/Francophone literature from a range of time periods, literary movements, and genres. Discussion and analysis of a variety of texts, with consideration of their cultural and historical backgrounds. Course taught in English. Students who wish to obtain credit towards a French minor should co-enroll in FREN 305L . This course may be repeated up to two times for credit under different topics. F, S.
  
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    LIS 390 - Topics in Russian Culture (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to Russian culture through its history, literature, folklore, cinema, and fine arts. It provides students with an opportunity to analyze main ideas and values that have shaped the cultural identities of Russians. The intellectual and cultural history of Russia is explored through important textual and artistic images of Russian culture. The course also tracks the transformations of Russian culture from its origins to the present. No knowledge of Russian is required for this course. F, S.
  
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    LIS 401 - The Holocaust (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course will approach the Nazi genocide from a German Studies perspective, examining the cultural and ideological foundations of modern anti- Semitism and National Socialism, as well as representations of the Holocaust in post-war and contemporary German and Austrian society. Fictional texts, films, memoirs, speeches, essays, and poetry will be examined in historical context, and issues and debates surrounding Holocaust representation will be explored. The course is taught in English; no knowledge of German is required. Students who wish to obtain credit towards a German minor should co-enroll in GERM 301L : German Culture Lab. S.
  
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    LIS 402 - Gender and Sexuality in German and Austrian Culture (3 credits)


    (=WGST 402 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101 ) German and Austrian artists, intellectuals, and scientists have exercised enormous influence on attitudes about gender and sexuality over the course of the twentieth century and up to the present day. This class traces the development of discourses of gender and sexuality by analyzing works of fiction, non-fiction, and film in the cultural, social, and political context in which they were created. Topics to be addressed include psychoanalysis, sexology, homosexual emancipation, the women’s movement and feminism, the sexual politics of Nazi Germany, and contemporary debates surrounding multiculturalism. The course is taught in English and open to students without prior knowledge of German. To receive credit for the German minor or towards the major in Languages and Intercultural Studies, students must co-enroll in GERM 301L : German Culture Lab. F.
  
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    LIS 403 - Nazi Cinema (3 credits)


    Our culture’s fascination with Nazis and Nazi Germany is unending. Whether we are trying to understand how normal people can be swept up by a wave of fascism, or whether we are reincarnating Nazis as ultimate villains of our films, games, and other visual media, our fascination with fascism endures. The course includes both cinema from Nazi Germany and contemporary images of Nazis from Germany and beyond to better understand both sides of this fascination. F, S, M, Su.

Latin

  
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    LATN 110 - Introductory Latin I (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of the language. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, sentence analysis, and writing. Readings familiarize student with Roman culture.
  
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    LATN 120 - Introductory Latin II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: LATN 110  or by placement) A continuation of Latin 110 with the introduction of additional vocabulary and grammatical constructions.
  
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    LATN 130 - Introductory Latin III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: LATN 120  or by placement) Mastery of complex constructions and English translation. Emphasis on composition and oral/silent reading skills.

Latin American Studies

  
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    LATS 326 - Cuban Literature in Translation (1 to 3 credits)


    (= SPAN 326 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) (Coreq: Travel study in Cuba) Selected readings in Cuban literature in translation. Students will read, research and write on Cuban literature, society and culture. A non-refundable deposit is required upon registration.
  
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    LATS 399 - Independent Study in Latin America (3 credits)


    An independent study course conducted under faculty supervision in Latin America. The course may be conducted through any university department. It is normally taken by students enrolled in SPAN 350 , Study Abroad.

Library

  
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    LIBR 103 - Strategies for Academic Research (1 credit)


    This course introduces students to search strategies and resources necessary for conducting academic research. Students will learn how to locate and search in appropriate databases and will develop skills to find, access, evaluate and use needed information efficiently and responsibly. F, S.
  
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    LIBR 113 - Research Strategies for Education Students (1 credit)


    This course will introduce and reinforce search skills that will assist students in finding sources suitable to college, professional, and personal research questions. Students will learn the research process and skills needed to conduct advanced research in education. In addition to readings and class activities, students will have hands-on practice in the classroom to further develop their skills in recognizing when information is needed and developing or strengthening the ability to find, evaluate, and use the needed information responsibly. Focusing on advanced research strategies and the process of research will help students navigate the complex world of information and enable students to locate better quality sources more efficiently. F, S.
  
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    LIBR 123 - Strategies for Business Research (1 credit)


    This course introduces students to search strategies and resources necessary to research a public company and an industry. Students will learn how to locate and search in both free and proprietary resources and will develop skills to find, access, evaluate and use information to conduct business research. F, S.
  
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    LIBR 133 - Strategies for Science Research (1 credit)


    This course introduces students to search strategies and resources necessary for conducting science research. Students will learn how to locate and search in appropriate subject-specific databases and will develop skills to find, access, evaluate and use information efficiently and responsibly. F, S.

Management

  
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    MGMT 306 - Organizational Theory & Behavior (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) A study of the organization, focusing on interactions between organizational designs and people within an ethical framework. The dynamics and links between individuals, groups, and the national and international environment are analyzed to highlight the determinants of organizational effectiveness. A major focus is on the development of positive interpersonal relations. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 308 - Managing Human Capital (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 301 ) This course presents how human resources contribute to organizational performance. The course examines how human behavior theories about personality, perception, conflict management, and motivation influence the development of human resource systems for staffing, evaluating, and rewarding people. Students will develop interpersonal and technical competencies to improve their workforce readiness. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 309 Q* - Leading High Performance Teams (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 301 ) This course provides exposure to essential concepts related to working with and leading others in small groups and teams. The course will explore aspects of interpersonal dynamics including power, communication, trust, team decision making, and conflict. Students will practice organizing, leading, and collaborating in a team environment. As a result, this course will devote significant time to personal leadership development and the improvement of interpersonal skills, such as conflict management, active listening, and supportive communication. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 320 Q* - Entrepreneurial Leadership (3 credits)


    (Prereq: junior standing) This course focuses on explaining the roles of entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs and innovation leaders in organizations and their potential impact on the larger world. The general ethic of the innovative and creative orientation of entrepreneurial leadership will be detailed. Practice in basic entrepreneurial leadership concepts are supported by hands-on projects and exercises. Students will be helped in integrating into their own lives the entrepreneurial ethic for long-run success in business and life. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 324 - Idea Generation in the Innovation Process (3 credits)


    This course will provide a systematic approach to creativity, the foundation for students to understand how to generate innovative ideas in any field. The course gives students the theories behind and practice using tools to generate meaningfully unique ideas. These tools engage creative stimuli, diversity, and mining for technology and economic, social and cultural trends. The course will examine case histories that demonstrate how social and cultural contexts and human institutions have been influenced by innovative individuals who have realized original ideas in practice.
  
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    MGMT 325 - Communicating Novel Ideas in Dynamic Settings (3 credits)


    (Prereq or Coreq: MGMT 324 ) This course combines elements of several disciplines to generate clear, precise and creative expression. Attention is given to narrative power of visual imagery as well as text; an emphasis is placed on writing as a method of prototyping and technology translation. Students learn to communicate the benefit, the uniqueness, and the credibility of a concept to others. Students work with innovators to explore and translate the benefits of technical and specialized ideas to a target audience. Students will learn how to evaluate novel ideas through the process of articulation and to translate big ideas into words that persuade others to take action.
  
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    MGMT 340 - Attracting and Acquiring Talent (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MGMT 308 ) Examines the processes necessary for the effective recruitment, selection, and orientation of employees in an organizational setting. The course will focus on human resources planning to meet organizational goals; job analysis and design; developing valid and reliable selection systems; ensuring legal compliance of selection systems; and facilitating the entry of new employees into the organization. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 341 - Managing Talent and Developing 21st Century Leaders (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MGMT 308 ) Extends the study of human resource management with a focus on developing employees and managing employee performance. Topics include the development, implementation and evaluation of training programs and performance appraisal systems, as well as career planning and employee relations issues. This course provides an analysis of effective approaches to training and development, with an emphasis on leadership development, and an illustration of performance feedback. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 362 - Global Leadership Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 301 ) This course provides an introduction to global leadership and focuses on personal skill development as a leader in today’s diverse work environment. The course includes exposure to content related to the increasingly diverse nature of the global work environment, effective management of human capital in that environment, and how one’s personal skill level can be improved to maximize leadership potential. Through interactive assignments and exercises, students will be encouraged to develop a global diversity mindset that will enhance one’s ability to emerge as a leader in their field. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 420 - Current Topics in Entrepreneurship & Innovation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) (Coreq: MGMT 320  or permission of the instructor) This course enables a student to study emerging or important topics in entrepreneurship and innovation not covered in depth elsewhere. This includes areas of special interest to faculty or in an area of expertise. This can include but is not limited to service entrepreneurship, minority entrepreneurship, new venture fundraising, scientific product commercialization, and creative enterprise management. Offered as needed.
  
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    MGMT 421 - Initiation of a New Business Enterprise (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) This course enables students to consider the full set of business issues that exist in a business start-up and the appropriate analyses to complete a business plan proposal. Students will learn the tools and processes needed to create a business plan, what needs to be included in the business plan, why, and for whom. Students will evaluate the feasibility of an opportunity, determine preliminary marketing and financial management plans and design an organization to fit its business model. As part of building the business plan, this class will focus on communicating new ideas to a professional audience that may include potential investors, lenders, and customers. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 422 - Managing Family/Small Business Growth & Innovation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) This course will enable a student to consider a full set of growth and innovation issues along with change implementation issues that exist in family and small businesses. The course surveys the unique aspects of family and small businesses and addresses sources of change initiatives ranging from simple growth, transitions of leadership, and implementation of innovations. Topics include transfer of power from founder/family member to non-founder/non-family member, hiring and acquiring additional resources, managing networks, international opportunity identification and issues, advanced internet technology and the small/family business. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 423 - Study Abroad in Entrepreneurship & Innovation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301  and MGMT 320 ) One aspect of entrepreneurial and innovation activities is that entrepreneurs, intrepreneurs, and innovation leaders must learn to take action and learn from others no matter where they are in the world. This course requires the student to engage in an entrepreneurial, or innovation research activity that combines field experiences from a study abroad trip to another country with secondary research. Experiential engagement to shift among the countries of the world with an average of two countries being experienced. The student reflects on and shares the learning from the work done for the class. May, Su.
  
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    MGMT 424 - Feasibility and Commercialization of Novel Ideas (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MGMT 324  and MGMT 325 ) Students work with real product and service ideas and create working prototypes to find the flaws of a design quickly and inexpensively. Topics include application of the scientific method to the prototyping process, sales forecasting, open source technology, patent searching, provisional patent writing and some elements of market research and funding.
  
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    MGMT 429 Q* - Practicum in Entrepreneurship & Innovation (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in MGMT 421  or MGMT 422 ) One aspect of entrepreneurial and innovation activities is that entrepreneurs, entrepreneurs, and innovation leaders must learn to take action. This course requires the student to engage in an entrepreneurial, or innovation/growth implementation activity. Experiential engagement may include activities such as: Competing in business plan competitions; participating in ‘Students in Free Enterprise’ competitions; starting a business and demonstrating successful implementation (virtually or in real life); or doing a consulting project with a small business owner. A maximum of six (6) credit hours may be taken. F, S, Su.
  
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    MGMT 440 - Retaining Talent and Maximizing the Value of Human Capital (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MGMT 308 ) This course examines processes and practices associated with retaining employees in light of an organization’s strategic goals and objectives, including development and implementation of a total rewards system ensuring workplace safety and managing employee rights. Topics addressed include compensation, benefits, workplace safety, workplace violence, employee relations and labor relations. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 461 - Cross-Cultural Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) This course involves an analysis of how cultural, economic, and societal influences affect the practices of management. Concepts and practices of planning, organizing, leading employees, and other concerns are examined across different national settings. The human effect in the managerial process is emphasized, and situational influences are identified and examined. S.
  
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    MGMT 462 - Competing in Foreign Markets (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 301 ) This course focuses on why, where, and how firms choose to enter and compete in foreign markets. The role of the geographical, economic, cultural, and institutional environments in foreign market entry and competition will be addressed. Particular attention will also be paid to the ethical dilemmas presented by operating internationally. F.
  
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    MGMT 480 - Leadership in Project Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) Skills and techniques for effective project management. Topics include project development, budget management, scheduling, quality control, and team building. F, S.
  
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    MGMT 481 - Quality Process Management (3 credits)


    (=HRTM 474 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) The systematic process through which managers regulate organizational activities to meet planned goals and standards of quality. Topics will include different types of quality control processes, total quality management, product and service quality techniques, and the uses of information technology for insuring quality. F, S.
 

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