Dec 05, 2021  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computing Sciences

  
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    CSCI 473 - Introduction to Parallel Systems (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 220  and MATH 160 ) This course introduces parallel computer architectures and their programming. It includes an introduction to MPI and OpenMP and a number of engineering problems, including numerical simulations. It also provides an Introduction to performance evaluation and modeling as well as scalability analysis. S.
  
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    CSCI 475 - Decision Support Systems (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 225  and CSCI 330  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A study of decision support systems. Topics include computerized decision support and business intelligence systems, modeling, and methodologies. Course will cover data and web mining concepts, knowledge management technologies, collaboration techniques, and intelligent systems. Offered as needed.
  
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    CSCI 480 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220 ) Covers the fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence (AI); topics and techniques for analyzing and developing intelligent systems; programming in an AI language. Coverage may include applications in areas such as expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy logic, robotics, etc. F, even years.
  
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    CSCI 484 - Machine Learning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 220  and MATH 160 , or MATH 242 /MATH 242L ) This course provides an introduction to pattern recognition and machine learning. Topics may include probabilistic learning, linear discriminants, neural networks, unsupervised learning, decision trees, Bayesian networks, support vector machines, and reinforcement learning.
  
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    CSCI 485 - Introduction to Robotics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 220 ) An introduction to the fundamentals of mobile robotics including robot hardware, sensors, obstacle avoidance, navigation, mapping, path planning and robot architectures. F, odd years.
  
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    CSCI 490 - Software Engineering II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI 330  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course is a continuation of the software engineering design principles introduced in CSCI 330 . Topics include project requirements, design specifications, testing, project management and group dynamics. Student will design, code, test and implement an information system as part of a team project. F.
  
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    CSCI 495 - Information Systems Capstone Course and Project (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 225  and CSCI 330 ) This senior capstone course integrates and synthesizes the material covered in the field of Information Systems, including Systems Analysis, Project Management, System Development and Deployment, and Security. Students will develop a practical solution to an information systems problem. Presentation will be both oral and written. Lecture topics may vary from semester to semester. S.
  
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    CSCI 497 - Computer Science Internship (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Junior standing or higher, minimium overall GPA of 2.5, and one of the following courses with a grade of ‘C’ or better: CSCI 220 , CSCI 330 , CSCI 415 , or CSCI 416 ) Supervised work experience of at least 150 hours. Program format is approved by the area director. A written final paper is required. F, S, Su.
  
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    CSCI 498 - Cooperative Education (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: CSCI major with at least sophomore level status) Cooperative full-time work study arrangement among the University, the business or industry and the student. Arrangements are made in consultation with the department chair. This course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
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    CSCI 499 - Topics in Computer Science (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Special projects and recent developments in Computer Science selected to meet current faculty and student interest. Offered as needed.

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRMJ 421 - The Judicial Process (3 credits)


    A study of the growth of law, the law-making function of the courts, the structure and organization of federal and state courts, the procedures involved in civil and criminal cases, and the problems and proposals for reform in the administration of justice.

Digital Culture and Design

  
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    DCD 100 - Technology and Humanity (3 credits)


    Technologies play a central role in our culture, in the decisions we make, in our social relationships, in our health, in our safety, in conflict resolution, in the careers we pursue, in the way we work, play, and live. Given this, part of what it means to be human is to be a user of technology. Gaining a clearer and more well-articulated understanding of the moral and social-political implications of technologies thus allows for a more considered view of our place in the world and our progress as a human civilization (scientifically, ethically, and socially). The course considers technologies from different human perspectives. F, S.
  
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    DCD 101 - Humanities in the Digital Age (3 credits)


    The first half of this course provides a critical overview of methods, tools, and projects in the Digital Humanities; the second half of the course is devoted to a very basic introduction to building and using such tools in digital humanities projects. Students will leave the course with both a practical introduction to computational methods and a critical lens for understanding the impact of new media and digital tools on humanities inquiry and the liberal arts. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 102 - Information Design (3 credits)


    An introductory course that provides students with an overview of the concepts and methods of information design, the process of presenting information in a clear and effective way. This course focuses on information design in the humanities, and covers topics ranging from an introduction to the basic principles of visual information representation to hands-on applications of those concepts in creating digital documents. Students will explore a wide variety of free and professional software applications used in information design, including online mapping applications such as Google Maps and ArcGIS Online, infographics applications such as Piktochart, and interactive presentation applications such as Prezi. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 200 - Introduction to Digital Humanities (3 credits)


    An introductory course that provides students with a broad overview of the history, concepts, and methods of computing in the humanities. This course focuses not only on how use of computer technology has evolved in humanities disciplines and humanities-centered interdisciplinary research, but also explores basic methods and techniques in digital humanities through the examination of existing projects and hands-on exercises that allow students to build practical skill sets. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 201 - Coding for Humanists (3 credits)


    This course provides a basic knowledge of how computers operate and are operated, as well as the computational and procedural logics, media, and languages employed in the Digital Humanities. Students will also achieve a basic understanding of the principles of coding. The course also serves as an introduction to modes of collaboration between those who work conceptually with the Digital Humanities and those who are assigned the tasks of implementing the technical side of such projects. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 202 - Introduction to Digital Sources (3 credits)


    An introductory course that provides students with an overview of digital sources in the humanities. This course focuses not only on how the creation and use of digital sources have evolved in humanities disciplines and humanities-centered interdisciplinary research, but also explores the use of these sources through a critical examination of existing projects that utilize digital images, texts, maps, audio, and other digital media. Students will also develop practical skill sets through hands-on exercises utilizing humanities-based digital resources. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 231 - New Media and Digital Culture: From the Printing Press to Virtual Reality (3 credits)


    (=ENGL 231) (=NMDC 231) (Prereq: ENGL 101) This course employs an approach of “critical making” to explore the historical and contemporary transformations of identity, texts, and culture that follow in the wake of major shifts in new media. The course begins with some historical grounding in new media and then moves into a study of contemporary digital environments, texts, and culture through humanistic thought and expression and critical making: students will learn to produce in these environments while exploring the implications of these digital objects and texts (possible skills: HTML; web design; digital storytelling; Processing; code). This course is designed as a hybrid course and is designed around innovative developments in online and real-time learning. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    DCD 301 Q - Text Methods (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 345 ) This methods course provides an in depth overview and history of text technologies and the mediation of literary texts. Students are introduced to concepts of textual mediation, digitalization and archiving, as well as critical debates surrounding intellectual property in digital environments, text interface design, and the politics of reading and translation across modalities. Practically, students gain exposure and facility with text encoding systems and languages including TEI, XML, and metadata platforms (Omeka). F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 302 - Visual Methods (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 345 ) An intermediate course that provides students with an in-depth exploration of the theories and practicum of visual and verbal elements used by visual communicators. This course will build on the issues found in relation to cultural shifts in aesthetic trends and consumer behavior while also discussing solutions created by visual communicators and the software tools used. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 303 Q - Sound and Motion Methods (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 345 ) An intermediate course that provides students both an overview of digital video and audio technologies in humanities projects, and an opportunity to build practical skill sets in utilizing these technologies. This course focuses not only on how the use of digital audio and video has evolved in humanities disciplines and humanities-centered interdisciplinary research, but also explores basic methods and techniques for creating digital audio and video in humanities projects that will allow students to build practical skill sets. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 304 Q - Interactive Methods (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 345 ) This methods course provides an in depth overview of interactivity and interactive methods within new media and digital culture (this course is meant to be in dialogue with the histories and theories of interactivity explored in DCD 309  of the Digital Humanities sequence; though DCD 309  is not a required prerequisite). Students are introduced to concepts of interactivity, immersion, and virtuality. Practically, students gain exposure and facility with interactive programs, loops and interfaces in code environments or languages such as Processing, HTML 5, and/or Flash. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 309 - Interactivity and Culture (3 credits)


    The first half of this course provides a critical overview of concepts of interactivity and immersion, historically and within new media and digital culture; the second half of the course is devoted to a very basic introduction to building and using interactive structures, drawing on and developing skills and methods taught in earlier courses in the sequence. Students will leave the course with both a practical introduction to computational methods across humanities disciplines, and a critical lens for understanding the impact of new media and digital tools on humanities inquiry and the liberal arts. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 312 - Social Media (3 credits)


    This course provides a critical overview of concepts and best practices surrounding social media, historically and within new media and digital culture. Topics addressed will include new research on attention and cognition within digital culture, perceptions and skills necessary for critical consumption of information, best practices of digital participation and collective participatory culture, and the use of collaborative media and methodologies within networked environments. Students will get practice employing social media tools for projects on social media critique, analysis, and development. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 316 - Digital Resources in the Humanities (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 200  and DCD 202 ) An intermediate course that provides students both an overview of digital resources in humanities projects, and an opportunity to build practical skill sets in utilizing these resources. This course focuses not only on how digital resources have evolved in humanities disciplines and humanities-centered interdisciplinary research, but also explores the use of these resources through the examination of existing projects, including interdisciplinary databases, electronic texts, mapping and digital history projects, and New Media projects. Students will also develop practical skill sets through hands-on exercises utilizing humanities-based digital resources. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 345 - Knowledge Production and Digital Representation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 100 , DCD 101 , DCD 102 , DCD 200 , DCD 201 , DCD 202 ) Theories of knowledge representation can facilitate our ability to express how we are modeling information in digital and mediated environments. This course is meant to give students foundation knowledge in advanced digital methods and theory. Topics addressed will include: integrated media theory; digital media and meaning making; disciplinary digital knowledge; and symbolic cognition and human meaning making. F, S, Su.
  
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    DCD 488 Q - Capstone Course (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 495  or DCD 496 ) This course serves as a culminating experience for the program of study in this degree, allowing the student to bring together all the skills and knowledge acquired in the courses to produce and publish online a project of his/her own design. This course may be repeated one time for credit. F, S.
  
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    DCD 495 Q - Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 345 ) The guided internship requires 120 hours of on-site work, a journal, a final paper, and artifacts to be included in the student’s e-portfolio. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their knowledge and skills, to introduce them to local and regional employers in their field of study, and to enhance networking and collaboration opportunities. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 12 weeks at 10 hours per week. This course may be repeated one time for credit. F, S.
  
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    DCD 496 Q - Practicum (3 credits)


    (Prereq: DCD 345 ) The practicum requires 60 hours of on-site work, a journal, a final paper, and artifacts to be included in the student’s e-portfolio. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their knowledge and skills within a closely supervised work environment. By working on digital projects within the campus community, students also enhance their skills of collaboration and their understanding of project development and work flow. This course may be repeated one time for credit. F, S.

Economics

  
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    ECON 101 - Survey of Economics (3 credits)


    Designed to familiarize non-business majors with basic macro- and microeconomics models and selected economic problems. Not open to majors in Business Administration and Economics.
  
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    ECON 110 - Personal Finance (3 credits)


    The course is an analysis of individual and family financial decisions. The course is designed to prepare the student to exercise intelligent control over income, expenditures, borrowing, savings, investments, and retirement planning.
  
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    ECON 150 Q* - Global Issues in Economics (3 credits)


    A study of global economic issues such as globalization, environmental sustainability, poverty, economic development, and economic integration. This course also explores the roles of global institutions such as the IMF, UN and the World Bank. S.
  
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    ECON 201 Q* - Macroeconomics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in UNIV 110  or HONR 101 ; a grade of ‘C’ or better in one of the following: MATH 130 , MATH 132 , MATH 138 , or MATH 160  and completion of 24 semester hours) A study of macroeconomic analysis, basic economic definitions and concepts, supply and demand, fundamentals of American capitalism, national income, income and employment theory, and monetary and fiscal policy. F, S, Su.
  
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    ECON 202 - Microeconomics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in UNIV 110  or HONR 101 ; a grade of ‘C’ or better in one of the following: MATH 130 , MATH 132 , MATH 138 , or MATH 160 ; and completion of 24 semester hours)  Microeconomic analysis, theory of the firm, cost and output determination, marketing pricing, income distribution, and international economics. F. S, Su.
  
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    ECON 301 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) An advanced view of the macroeconomy. Role of inputs and technology in economic growth, study of differing schools of thought with respect to macroeconomic behavior. F.
  
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    ECON 302 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory and Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Microeconomic study of how consumers and firms make choices. Consumer theory is used to derive market demand, theory of the firm to derive market supply, and game theory to analyze interaction among agents. S.
  
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    ECON 310 - Money and Banking (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) An examination of the long-run profit motive in banking, the movements of interest rates, the history of U.S. central banking, and how money and credit influence the macroeconomy. S.
  
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    ECON 313 - History of Economic Thought (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Development of economic thought over time; comparison of theories of great economists from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes and their schools of thought, including classical economics, neoclassical economics, and heterodox economic thought. F.
  
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    ECON 320 - Environmental Economics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101  or permission of the instructor) This course studies how economic activities affect the environment, why we allow more environmental harm than is optimal and how such environmentally harmful activities should be regulated. The course discusses important environmental issues such as environmental policy, environmental valuation, global warming, public goods, environmental degradation, energy, global agreements, and economic development. S.
  
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    ECON 321 - Government and Business (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Examination of issues that confront government and business, allowing students to take sides and defend their positions in debate/discussion format. Topics include: Social Security privatization, social responsibility of businesses, the minimum wage, double taxation of dividends, and the government’s role in the regulation of business. S.
  
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    ECON 326 - Managerial Economics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Study of the theory of the firm, elasticity, product and cost, market concentration and integration. Topics include differing market environments, market power, pricing strategies, market failure, and subsequent government intervention. Non-economics majors only. S.
  
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    ECON 330 - Economics of Tourism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Economic theory is used to explain the demand for leisure and how people make decisions regarding leisure. Economic fundamentals of the tourism industry, development of tourist destinations, tourism in the Grand Strand area and tourism in the global economy. S.
  
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    ECON 331 - Economics Analysis of Sports (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C ‘or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) An economic analysis of participatory sports and amateur and professional team sports. Topics include professional sports franchises as business enterprises, economics of sports stadiums, economics of professional sports labor markets, impact of Title IX on collegiate athletic programs, and economic impact of professional team sports and participatory sports on the Grand Strand economy. F.
  
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    ECON 332 - Labor Economics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Economic analysis of the strategic aspects of human resource management at the firm and public policy levels. Focus on economic forces that influence hiring standards, employment, worker productivity, training programs, wages, and working conditions in the United States. Topics include the decline of job security, rise in educational and training requirements, managerial compensation and the use of incentive packages, impact of technology, trade, and unionization on employment and wages. Public policy issues include income inequality, safety and health, labor market discrimination, and the minimum wage. F.
  
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    ECON 333 - Economics of Energy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) This course examines markets for various extractive energy sources (such as oil, coal and natural gas,) as well as renewable energy sources (such as wind and solar). The course will: 1) investigate why energy markets have historically been subject to extensive governmental intervention; 2) analyze the effects of traditional policy measures such as price controls and regulation; and 3) examine current policy issues arising from the relationships among energy use, economic growth and the environment.
  
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    ECON 340 - Economics of Entrepreneurship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: junior level status) Entrepreneurship can be thought of as capitalizing on a situation. An entrepreneur is someone who recognizes opportunity and through creative endeavor acts to satisfy a need or desire of businesses or individuals. In broad terms, an entrepreneur combines resources in such a way that the resulting product is more valuable than the sum of its parts. In this course students will produce, examine, develop, and evaluate entrepreneurial endeavors.
  
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    ECON 351 - International Economic Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Study of international trade issues and policy and their impact on workers, firms, and governments; role of international investment, foreign exchange markets, and international migration. F.
  
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    ECON 352 - Economics of Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Applies economic models to development and developing countries; study of institutions and international organizations that aid or hamper development; the role of poverty, education, and the environment in development. S.
  
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    ECON 354 - Urban and Real Estate Economics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Urban economics is the study of the location of economic activities. This location-based approach makes it a fundamental basis for the study of real estate and the development and change of places. In this course you will analyze economic issues of cities and regions and various policies that have been implemented around the country and throughout the world to deal with certain economic issues of growth and development, with an emphasis on residential, commercial, and industrial real estate uses. F.
  
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    ECON 361 - US Fiscal Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of economic policy during various presidencies and periods of war. Emphasis will be given to Hamiltonian finance, the Jeffersonian approach to the debt as well as taxation and borrowing during wartime.
  
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    ECON 375 - Economics and National Security (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) This course will explore the relationship between economics and the new environment of heightened national security in the post-9/11 world. Emphasis will be given to how the global War on Terror (WOT) differs from past conflicts, economic attempts to diminish terrorism, intelligence gathering, economic sanctions, third-world debt relief, possible economic causes of terrorism, weapons of mass destruction (WMD) proliferation, and weapons procurement.
  
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    ECON 399 - Independent Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 54 or more hours) Written contract between student and instructor, approved by the dean. A maximum of 15 hours may be taken.
  
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    ECON 460 - Introduction to Econometrics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ) Mathematical modeling used to understand and explain economic relationships and theory. Topics include econometric, mathematical modeling, economic forecasting, generalized linear models, and categorical data analysis. S.
  
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    ECON 472 - Economics of Aging (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Enrollment in Certificate of Gerontology Program and permission of the instructor) The economic determinants of population aging and the challenges it creates for public policies. Topics include trends in retirement, retirement planning, the major provisions of the Social Security Act, various types of pension plans provided by employers, aging and gender, and various health, disability, and economic well-being issues of older Americans. S.
  
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    ECON 490 Q* - Senior Research Seminar (3 credits)


    (=ECON 495 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 301  and ECON 302 ) Capstone course intended to teach students how to conduct original research in economics. Guidance and practice in formulating economic hypotheses, gathering data, analyzing the data, and effectively communicating the results orally and in writing. S.
  
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    ECON 495 Q* - Advanced Economic Theory and Analysis (3 credits)


    (=ECON 490 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 301  and ECON 302 ) Capstone course intended to teach students how to conduct original research in economics. Guidance and practice in formulating economic hypotheses, gathering data, analyzing the data, and effectively communicating the results orally and in writing. F, S.
  
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    ECON 497 - Economics Internship (0 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: 54 or more hours, minimum GPA of 2.5, and approval of the department chair) The Economics Internship is a supervised work experience in the field of economics. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to maintain a detailed journal relative to their workplace activities, establish specific learning goals, complete a reflective essay regarding the experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of sixty (60) hours in the internship environment per credit hour earned. Students may receive from zero to twelve (0-12) credit hours for the Economics Internship course, which may be repeated up to three (3) times for credit; however, students cannot earn more than a total of twelve (12) economics internship credit hours over the course of a single undergraduate program and only six (6) credit hours may be applied toward the minimum credit hours required for a single Coastal Carolina University degree. F, S, Su.

Education

  
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    EDUC 111 - Exploring Teaching as a Profession (3 credits)


    Provides opportunities for students to explore teaching and learning and to begin the process of professional development as educators. Broadens students’ perspectives of the educational process and of the multiple roles of educators and helps them build a framework for participation in teacher preparation programs at Coastal Carolina University, as well as provides experiences to assist students in making decisions regarding careers in education. F, S, Su.
  
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    EDUC 204 Q* - Computer Technology and Instructional Media (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) A hands-on laboratory approach for developing computer literacy skills and for developing skills necessary to use instructional technology to enhance classroom instruction. F, S.
  
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    EDUC 215 Q - Schools & Diversity (3 credits)


    This course is designed to acquaint pre-service teachers with diversity issues in today’s classrooms. In addition to investigating the needs of students with disabilities and health issues, the roles such factors as race, class, gender, language proficiency, and cultural background play in the educational process will be explored. Methods of instruction and evaluation designed to meet the needs of a diverse student population will be addressed. The main goal of the course is to help future teachers discover their own attitudes and values as they pertain to diversity and develop the knowledge and skills that will enable them to create inclusive classroom environments and to provide equal educational opportunities for all students. This course involves a 15 hour experiential learning experience. F, S, Su.
  
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    EDUC 270 Q - Informal Science Education: Teaching Science in Non-School Settings (3 credits)


    This course is designed to introduce students to the world of informal science education, or science taught in non-school settings such as museums, state parks, environmental education centers, and zoos. This course will include, among other topics, the study of environmental education curricula, zoology education, and methods of implementation. The course is designed for those who have had little or no professional preparation in education courses, but are interested in learning how to communicate scientific information to children and the public. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to present educational information from fields including herpetology (reptiles and amphibians), entomology (insects), and marine sciences to children and the general public. The focus of the course will be on informal educational experiences. F, S.
  
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    EDUC 274 Q - Special Topics in Education: Culture and Education in Ecuador (3 credits)


    Participants take an international education and culture course that includes a service-learning component. This program provides a unique opportunity for students to apply book knowledge, theory, and personal experiences with students and school types in a different cultural setting. In Ecuador, participants observe children in an international K-12 multi-lingual, English instruction school for eight days. Students work with the students and examine aspects of culture, teaching methods, and developmental theory that relate to education in both the United States and Ecuador. Weekday mornings are spent in the schools, with afternoons used to tour local heritage sites and landmarks. Other days offer the opportunity to visit inner-city public schools and work with the children on site. Students meet for class for on the CCU campus for one week prior to the trip, and for one week after the trip. M.
  
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    EDUC 276 - Early Childhood Foundations (3 credits)


    An overview of the historical, philosophical, legal and practical aspects of early childhood education. F, May.
  
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    EDUC 334 - Adolescent Growth and Development (3 credits)


    An investigation of the various patterns and theories related to intellectual, social, emotional, and physical growth and development of preadolescent and adolescent learners with a focus on developmental applications in education settings. S.
  
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    EDUC 335 - Introduction to Educational Psychology (3 credits)


    Psychology of learning, learning theories, stages of development as applied to the learner in the classroom, with attention given to research into learning problems, management, as well as measurement of learning and least restrictive environments for learning. F, S.
  
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    EDUC 336 - Introduction to Human Growth and Development (3 credits)


    An investigation of various patterns of intellectual, social, emotional, and physical growth of learners from prenatal through adult periods with a focus on developmental applications in educational settings. F, S, Su.
  
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    EDUC 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


  
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    EDUC 402 - Special Topics (1 to 3 credits)



Education - Early Childhood

  
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    EDEC 270 - Health, Safety, and Motor Development for Young Children (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide a foundation for current and accurate information on health, safety and motor development for young children. As early childhood pre-professionals, students will learn to advocate for young children’s health and safety needs and provide appropriate health, safety, and motor development experiences for young children. F, S, Su.
  
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    EDEC 300 - Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting Progress (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course is designed to prepare early childhood candidates to use appropriate assessments to evaluate students’ progress and guide instructional planning, and interpret and report assessment results to families. A variety of assessment techniques will be emphasized. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 314 - Language and Emergent Literacy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEC 332 , EDEC 339 , and EDEC 340 ) This course will prepare candidates to understand language and literacy acquisition, the interrelationship of literacy and language, and instructional strategies and resources necessary for teaching beginning readers and writers, with main focus on children from birth through grade three. Practicum experiences required. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 325 - Guiding Young Children’s Behavior and Classroom Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) Study of appropriate, effective principles and techniques for guiding behavior and managing early childhood classrooms. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 332 - Child Development: The Young Child (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) The study of intellectual, physical, social and emotional development for the total human life span with a special emphasis on prenatal through grade three, within an ecological context. Critical thinking, creative expression and diagnosis/assessment are emphasized. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 339 - Early Childhood Programs and Curriculum (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course is designed to develop an understanding of early childhood programs and curriculum, philosophical orientations that guide program and curriculum development in early childhood education - Pre-kindergarten through grade 3 - and developmentally appropriate practice. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 340 - Early Childhood: Field Experience II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) Field placement in a pre-kindergarten classroom where teacher candidates have opportunities to apply knowledge and skills in authentic situations. Emphasis on developing an understanding of children’s development and implications of development for program planning for both typical and atypical children. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 376 - Integrated Math/Science/Social Studies I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEC 340  and MATH 202 ) This course will include theoretical and practical aspects of cognitive and social development for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten children emphasizing an integrated approach to planning and implementing developmentally appropriate teaching-learning experiences, and determining appropriate curriculum content in science, mathematics, and social studies. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 377 - Strategies for Teaching and Learning with Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEC 340 ) This methods course focuses on developing appropriate instructional strategies for utilizing literature to integrate the curriculum. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 379 - Early Childhood: Field Experience III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEC 340 ) Field placement in a preschool through third grade classroom where teacher candidates have opportunities to apply knowledge and skills in authentic situations. Emphasis on developing an increased understanding of children’s development and implications of development for program planning for both typical and atypical children. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 420 Q* - Integrated Math/Science/Social Studies II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEC 379 ) This course will include theoretical and practical aspects of cognitive development for children in grades 1 through 3 emphasizing an integrated approach to planning and implementing developmentally appropriate teaching-learning experiences, and determining appropriate curriculum content in science, mathematics, and social studies. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 421 - Child, Family, Community, Teacher Relations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEC 379 ) This course will prepare teacher candidates to work effectively in building relations with children, families, and communities through family and community involvement, conferencing, formal and informal communications, and knowledge of families and community served. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 423 Q* - Early Childhood: Field Experience IV (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEC 300 , EDEC 376 , EDEC 377 , and EDEC 379 ) Field placement in a primary grade (1-3) classroom where teacher candidates have opportunities to apply knowledge and skills in authentic situations. Emphasis on developing deeper understanding of children’s development and implications of development for program planning for both typical and atypical children. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 466 Q - Internship in Elementary School (Early Childhood) (9 credits)


    (Early Childhood) The internship experience is comprised of supervised teaching experiences in a pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, first, second or third grade classroom. F, S.
  
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    EDEC 496 - Internship Seminar (3 credits)


    (Coreq: EDEC 466 ) Course provides Teacher Candidates with focused content related to the successful completion of the internship process and requirements. F, S.

Education - Elementary

  
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    EDEL 329 - Art for Elementary Schools (3 credits)


    Methods of teaching art to elementary school children. Major emphasis will be given to relevant studio experiences. F, S.
  
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    EDEL 341 - Elementary School Curriculum and Organization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) A study of elementary education in America, (2-6). This course addresses the history and organization of elementary schools and their curriculum. Other topics include classroom management and organization, and assessment/evaluation of student learning. Practicum required.  F, S.
  
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    EDEL 343 - Instructional Theory and Practice-Elementary Education (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education and completion of EDEL 341 ) Application of general teaching models as they apply to subject matter in the elementary school. The student is expected to demonstrate a variety of instructional competencies during supervised teaching situations in simulated settings and in school classrooms. Practicum experiences in public schools are required.  F, S.
  
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    EDEL 385 - Teaching English Language Arts (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Elementary Education) (Coreq: EDEL 343 ) An interdisciplinary and integrated approach to the study of constructivist, research-based methods for teaching English Language Arts to elementary students. Particular attention is directed toward preparing candidates to analyze young students’ writing and to plan instruction that will foster students’ growth and improve their skills in writing. F, S.
  
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    EDEL 467 Q - Internship in Elementary School (Elementary) (9 credits)


    (Coreq: EDEL 496 ) The Elementary Education Internship remains the culminating field experience for Elementary Education candidates. The internship requires candidates to assume most or all of the responsibilities of an Elementary Teacher (grades 2-6) for at least 60 continuous days. F, S.
  
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    EDEL 472 Q - Classroom Management for Diverse Settings (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) (Coreq: EDLL 414 ) This course addresses the management and diversity issues in current elementary school classrooms. Topics will include types of management styles, analysis of classroom behavior, effect of diversity on classroom environment, and the application of effective management techniques. Candidates will focus on developing decision-making skills and professional judgments based on appropriate management philosophies. A field experience is included. Requires concurrent enrollment in EDLL 414 . F, S.
  
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    EDEL 481 Q* - Teaching Elementary Mathematics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Elementary Education; MATH 201 , MATH 202 ) EDEL 481 is the study of instructional mathematical strategies that promotes candidates’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills in mathematics. This course will focus on the constructivist approach to teaching and learning mathematics and teaching strategies that encourage elementary students to think mathematically. Throughout the course, class work will be connected to the field experience. F, S.
  
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    EDEL 486 - Teaching Social Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Elementary Education) A constructivist approach to the study of research-based social studies teaching methods for the elementary grades. Particular attention is given to integrating the social studies with other content areas. F, S.
  
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    EDEL 488 Q* - Teaching Elementary Science (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Elementary Education) EDEL 488 focuses on developing instructional strategies for teaching science content as a means for achieving scientific literacy and understanding science inquiry. A broad range of science content will be explored in the context of the NSES strands Nature of Science, Science as Inquiry, Science and Technology, and Science in Personal and Social Perspectives. Candidates will be exposed to a variety of science teaching models with an emphasis on constructivism and integrated instruction in a community context. Throughout the course, class work will be connected to the field experience. F, S.
  
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    EDEL 496 - Internship Seminar (3 credits)


    (Coreq: EDEL 467 ) The Elementary Education Seminar provides candidates with the content and support required for successful completion of the Elementary Internship and induction into the profession. F, S.

Education - Instructional Technology

  
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    EDIT 106 - Cyberspace, Technology, and Learning (3 credits)


    This course’s specific aims are: (1) to expand students’ knowledge of the impact of technology on human learning and behaviors; (2) to explore how technology both affects and expresses humans’ values; (3) to develop higher-level intellectual capabilities for responding critically to the use and development of technology; (4) to articulate an informed personal judgment to works in modern society and learning environments. The ultimate goal of this course is to prepare students to be informed and intellectual consumers of technology in the digital age. F, S.
  
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    EDIT 124 - Instructional Video Production for Informal Learning (3 credits)


    Social media sites are often used as non-academic informal learning environments where knowledgeable participants produce and share videos that teach Do-It-Yourself audiences how to perform practical tasks, such as change a tire, repair an appliance, cook a meal, perform a dance, conduct an exercise, apply makeup, and similar. This course explores how modern theories of visual design and multimedia cognition can be applied to adapted professional workflows for instructional video production using limited resources. The course scaffolds students to think critically in order to solve a variety of production challenges relevant to instructional design, script writing, set planning, talent management, camera operation, shot composition, audio capture, lighting design, timeline editing, and online publishing. F, S, Su.

Education - Language and Literacy

  
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    EDLL 200 - Literacy in the Digital Age: Tweets, Texts, and Avatars (3 credits)


    What it means to be literate is constantly changing. The very texts we read have changed from being static, paper-based documents to being dynamic, digital media. This course gives students the opportunity to make meaning of the different ways people engage these texts. Offered as a hybrid, students will spend time in the community exploring people’s different interactions with text and then meet as a group on campus to share their experiences and findings. F, S.
  
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    EDLL 300 - Teaching English Language Learners (3 credits)


    (Restricted to pre-service teachers in the professional program) This course prepares candidates to teach and assess English Language Learners (ELLs) using differentiated strategies and sheltered instruction that address ELLs’ language proficiency levels and instructional needs. The candidates plan and teach Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) lessons. S.
  
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    EDLL 314 - Foundations in Reading and Emergent Literacy Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission into the Spadoni College of Education Professional Program) Study of the theoretical and evidenced-based foundations of literacy development and instruction from birth through grade three. Emphasis is placed on understanding the acquisition and interrelationship of literacy and language and instructional practices and environments that support expressive and receptive language development. F, S.
  
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    EDLL 377 - Instructional Practices for Literacy in Early Childhood Classrooms (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDLL 314 ) This methods course focuses on planning for and managing a developmentally appropriate early childhood literacy classroom. Emphasis will be placed on balanced literacy methods and research-based, learner-centered instructional strategies for integrating all language arts curriculum areas. F, S.
  
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    EDLL 414 - Instructional Practices for Intermediate Literacy Development (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDLL 314 ) This course emphasizes instructional approaches, strategies, and curricula for supporting reading and writing development in grades two - six. Emphasis is placed on developing the processes of reading and writing, enhancing critical literacy awareness, and differentiating instruction in the Literacy classroom to address the diverse needs of students. Practicum required. F, S.
 

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