Jun 29, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Recreation and Sport Management

  
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    RSM 392 Q - Field Experience in Recreation and Sport Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RSM 337 ) A supervised practicum in a professional setting; on-site observation in a public, private or commercial setting with experience in all working areas and activities pertinent to that agency.
  
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    RSM 393 - Sport Media and Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RSM 242 ) This course is designed to provide insight into public and media relations in the recreation and sport management fields. The content of the course will allow the student to examine and apply strategic public relations concepts to the internal and external communication problems encountered in these occupations. The course will cover general principles and strategies of public relations and will include a component of effective communications in recreation and sport organizations. The course will also focus on the application of public relations, media relations, and publicity in a variety of settings. F, S.
  
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    RSM 394 - Sport Technology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RSM 242 ) This course will introduce students to current technology advances that enhance various management aspects of sport organizations. Emphasis will be on the use of computer technology with topics including fundamental website development, relational database management, potential application of data mining in sport organization decision making, internet based recruiting, electronic ticketing, virtual signage, video streaming, use of technology for facility and risk management, and use of multimedia for instruction or promotion of sport related programs. F. S.
  
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    RSM 396 - Orientation to Internship (1 credit)


    (Prereq: 90 credit hours earned) Plan and prepare for internship in recreation and sport management. Analyze career placement opportunities, the internship process, and associate requirements. For recreation and sport management students only or permission of the instructor. F, S.
  
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    RSM 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and advisor) Written contract between student and instructor, approved by the department chair. F, S.
  
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    RSM 400 - Sport in Contemporary Society (3 credits)


    (=SOC 403 ) (Prereq: 75 credit hours earned) An investigation into sport as a microcosm of society and how it is influenced by cultural traditions, social values, and psychosocial experiences. Emphasis is placed on how sport managers are immersed in the soci-cultural milieu, with sport as the focus. Course includes the examination of changing attitudes, behaviors, and trends in the world of sport. F, S.
  
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    RSM 410 - Sales and Finance in Recreation and Sport Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ECON 101  and RSM 290 ) This course introduces students to the concepts of financial management and sales as applied to the unique world of sports. This course will analyze and produce skills essential to the revenue production and sales process commonly found in the sport business. The course concentrates on understanding the application of several key financial analysis techniques to the operation of sport organizations. Specific focus will also include budget analysis, contract negotiation and understanding the use of economic impact studies to justify sport events and facilities in host communities. Furthermore, this course discusses the financial concepts and theories and their application in the professional, intercollegiate, and commercial sport settings. F, S.
  
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    RSM 432 - Research and Evaluation in Recreation and Sport Management (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) (Prereq: RSM 369  or ECON 320  or ECON 330  and Senior standing) Systematic, structured problem-solving for decision making in recreation and sport management services. Research techniques/evaluation procedures; quantitative, qualitative methodologies; deductive, inductive reasoning.
  
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    RSM 438 - Recreation for Active Aging (3 credits)


    This course introduces the students to recreation activities and techniques for working with senior adults. Topics include procedures for programming, implementation, and evaluation of recreation activities that serve senior adults. F.
  
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    RSM 456 - Principles of Administration in Recreation and Sport Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RSM 392 ) Administrative policies and organizational management of recreation and sport including financial and personnel practices. Use of research including needs assessments, evaluations, and feasibility studies will be discussed as it applies of administrative decision making. F, S.
  
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    RSM 482 - Special Topics in Recreation and Sport Management (3 credits)


    (Restricted to junior or senior standing) Topics of special interest in contemporary recreation and sport management. Reading, research, and application of selected subject(s). This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. Offered as needed.
  
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    RSM 490 - Program and Event Planning in Recreation and Sport (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RSM 337  and 75 credit hours earned) This course focuses on the principles and approaches to planning and implementing recreation programs. A philosophical and practical basis for preparing a variety of recreation programs will be covered. F, S.
  
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    RSM 492 - Campground Administration (3 credits)


    (Computer Usage) (Prereq: RSM 392 ) Basic concepts of campgrounds and management. Topics include administration and organizational structure, business management, insurance for special groups or special camps, day camping, residence camping, recreational vehicle camping, campground facility design and maintenance, special event planning, and camp appraisals.
  
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    RSM 494 - Area and Facility Management in Recreation and Sport (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 75 credit hours earned) Basic consideration in planning, construction, design and maintenance of sport and recreation areas, facilities and buildings. F, S.
  
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    RSM 496 Q - Internship in Recreation and Sport Management (12 credits)


    (Prereq: senior standing and successful completion of all required RSM courses, successful completion of internship application, and exit examination) This is a 480 hour and twelve week full-time supervised experience in recreation or sport at a cooperative and approved agency. F, S, Su.
  
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    RSM 499 - Directed Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and advisor) Using the scientific method, directed undergraduate research on a recreation or sport related topic to be developed by the student and instructor. F, S.

Religious Studies

  
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    RELG 103 - World Religions (3 credits)


    This class introduces students to the academic study of religion and surveys the global range of religious traditions. It examines various worldwide patterns of religious beliefs and practices, and investigates particular traditions, communities, and their respective histories and development. The course also investigates the role of religion in the modern world. F, S, Su.
  
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    RELG 104 - Introduction to Asian Religions (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to the most prevalent and enduring ideas, images, and personalities of Asian religious traditions including Daoism, Confucianism, East Asian Shamanism, Shinto, and Buddhism. The regions of focus include India, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan, with some reference to other areas of Asia.
  
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    RELG 203 - Studying Religion: Theory and Methods (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to theory and method in the academic study of religion. It is not a survey of different religions (though students explore several religions). The course encourages students to think critically about the role of religion in individual and collective life around the world. Course material is designed to help students understand and apply these ideas to the religious behavior and beliefs of real people, cultures and societies, and evaluate and formulate arguments that explain these behaviors and beliefs. S.
  
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    RELG 205 - Introduction to Abrahamic Religions (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the Abrahamic religious traditions, namely Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. It explores the beliefs, practices, and institutions of these traditions, as well their sacred texts and traditions of interpretation. Ancient Near Eastern history, beliefs and practices is also examined. Based on lectures, assigned readings, multimedia, and discussions, this course explores the historical development of Abrahamic religious history, thought and practice. Offered as needed.
  
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    RELG 301 - Hebrew Bible (3 credits)


    A critical study of the literature of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) emphasizing its historical development and meaning in Jewish communities. No knowledge of Hebrew is required or needed. Offered as needed.
  
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    RELG 302 - New Testament (3 credits)


    An historical and critical study of the origin, structure, and transmission of the New Testament writings and their meaning in life and thought of the early Church; emphasis is placed on the life, teachings, and significance of Jesus and Paul-both for their day and for ours.
  
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    RELG 311 - Gospel Traditions (3 credits)


    An analysis of the historical and social setting of the Gospel designed to afford the student a fuller understanding of Jesus and his mission.
  
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    RELG 312 - The Life and Letters of Paul (3 credits)


    A critical study of the life and thought of Paul, his letters to the early Christian churches, his role in the expansion of the Christian movement, and his continuing influence today.
  
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    RELG 320 - Introduction to Buddhism (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to the diverse Buddhist traditions of the world through a study of theories, practices, images, and social settings. It begins with an examination of stories of the life of Buddha and the religious-political situation in India at the time his ideas began to flourish. It also follows the development of later Buddhism in India and its manifestations as Theravada traditions of Southeast Asia. It also examines Buddhism’s development of a Mahayana and Tantric traditions in Tibet and East Asia.
  
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    RELG 322 - Introduction to Islam (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the diversity of the Islamic tradition and various Muslim communities, as well as the methods and resources used in Religious Studies. It will cover some of the history of the development of the Islamic tradition and various Muslim communities, while exploring wide-ranging beliefs, practices, figures, concepts, debates, institutions, and communities. It will explore the tradition both historically and contemporarily. Topics covered may include debates over the idea of Islam, the Prophet Muhammad, the Qur’an, and some subsequent Islamic expressions, such as Sunni and Shi’i Muslims, the development of schools of law, theological debates, Islamic mysticism, responses to modernity, and contemporary Muslim communities. F or S.
  
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    RELG 323 - Christianity: Sects and Practices (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to the 2,000 year history of Christianity. It explores the development and formation of Christian texts (canonical and non-canonical), doctrines, rituals, institutions, modes of devotional life, and the contributions of major Christian thinkers. The disputes within the Church that produced the enormous variety of sects and denominations in Christianity are also explored in historical context. Offered as needed.
  
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    RELG 324 - Hinduism (3 credits)


    A survey of Hinduism through history, theology, sacred texts, spiritual practices, social organizations, and politics. The course proceeds from the earliest phases of the religion to contemporary groups and practices. Students will be introduced to key ideas and beliefs in Hinduism, and will examine major texts in the tradition. They may also study Hindu devotional deities as depicted in art and music, and explore modern developments in Hinduism, including major political initiatives. S.
  
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    RELG 325 - Religion in Contemporary American Film (3 credits)


    A critical study of religious beliefs and practices as seen through the medium of film. Students will view contemporary American films and film clips through the lens of religious studies. Lectures and films are augmented by online discussion boards.
  
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    RELG 326 - Buddhism in Literature and Film (3 credits)


    (Prereq: one religious studies course or permission of the instructor) ure and film. The course considers the nature, power, or inability of literature and film to convey various themes such as “no-self,” “suchness,” “Buddhamind,” and “enlightenment.” Students are challenged to question ideas of scriptural authority as well as “Orientalist” representations.
  
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    RELG 330 - Introduction to Judaism (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the diversity of the Jewish tradition, as well as the methods and resources used in Religious Studies. The approach will be partially historical to facilitate the exploration of current beliefs, practices, concepts, debates, institutions, and communities. Topics covered may include conflict between Jews and Muslims, anti-Semitism, varieties of American Judaism, and cultural expressions of Jews worldwide. Offered as needed.
  
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    RELG 331 - The Qur’an (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RELG 103  or RELG 322 ) This course introduces students to Islam’s primary sacred text, the Qur’an, and its impact on world history. It explores the history and the formation of the Qur’an as a written text, its place in Muslim religious life, and its many interpretations from a variety of sectarian and cultural perspectives over the last 1300 years. No knowledge of Arabic is required. Offered as needed.
  
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    RELG 350 - Lives of Hindu and Buddhist Saints (3 credits)


    A study of lives of individuals related to Hinduism and Buddhism who are alleged to be “saints” in stories, biographies, and autobiographies. These life accounts are compared to archetypes found in canonical sources including the Ramayana, the Bhagavata Purana, and Buddhist Jataka. The class considers the genre of religious biography/hagiography in such terms as intended audience and practical usage of the texts. Students will examine stories about ancient and modern Hindus and Buddhists from India, China, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, and America. S.
  
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    RELG 351 - Religion of India (3 credits)


    The personal religious goals and characteristic social patterns which have developed in India from pre-Vedic times to the modern period. Particular attention will be given to the interaction of Hinduism, Buddhism, and transcultural influences.
  
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    RELG 352 - Zen Buddhism (3 credits)


    A study of the philosophies and practices of Zen Buddhism as they appear in East Asia and America. Primary emphasis is placed on the idea of Zen as a transformative practice. The course uses classic Mahāyāna texts and the writings of Zen teachers. It also examines Zen through koans, zazen, engaged Buddhism, arts, and films. The class considers the relationship of Zen mind and Zen practice. May.
  
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    RELG 355 - Islam, Ethics, and the Environment (3 credits)


    This course is to serve as an overview of environmental ethics, religious responses to environmental issues, and Islamic ethics, as well as some of the gaps between ideals and practices. F.
  
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    RELG 356 - Islam in America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RELG 103  or RELG 205  or RELG 322 ) This course is an introduction to the beliefs, practices, and histories of various Muslim communities in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics covered may include debates over concepts of Islamic orthodoxy, interpretations of the Qur’an, and responses to modernity, as well as anti-Muslim prejudice in the United States. S.
  
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    RELG 360 - Women and World Religions (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RELG 103  or permission of the instructor) An examination of the historical and social context of issues in religion or sanctioned by religion that are uniquely related to women.
  
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    RELG 363 - Women and Gender in Islam (3 credits)


    This course will serve as an introduction to the relations between gender and Islamic belief and practice. It will examine the historic, social, cultural, political, and economic factors that have influenced Muslim ideas and practices pertaining to gender and sexuality, as well as perceptions about the relation between Islamic belief, practices, and gender. F.
  
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    RELG 365 - Religious Diversity in the South (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RELG 103 ) This is a survey of the evolution of religion in the South from its beginnings to the arrival of new religions and movements in the twentieth century. This course will review the development of major denominational churches as well as the evolution of “folk belief”. Integral to the course will be the consideration of women’s roles, and attitudes toward women in religion. Religious history of South Carolina and the low country, specifically, will serve as the focus for the course, with particular attention given to new religious arrivals.
  
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    RELG 366 - Religions of the West African Diaspora (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RELG 103  or permission of the instructor) This course explores the transatlantic travel and transplanting of ancient African religions (e.g. Yoruba, Bakongo, and Vodun) in the Americas and the Caribbean. Particular attention is given to the merging of African religion with Christianity to form new religions (e.g. Condomble’, Santeria and Gullah religion) as well their influence on folk cultures from food ways to music. S.
  
  
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    RELG 399H - Interdisciplinary Independent Study (3 to 9 credits)


    Directed independent study at the honors level in two or more departments.
  
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    RELG 491 - Selected Topics in Religious Studies (3 credits)


    Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    RELG 498 - Advanced Project (3 credits)


    A supervised research project or other creative work, normally taken in the senior year.

Reserve Officers Training Corps

  
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    ROTC 101 - Fundamentals of Military Service (2 credits)


    An introduction to the mission, organization and history of ROTC: Military and civilian obligation in relation to National Security; Individual Arms and Marksmanship Techniques, Emergency Medical Treatment. The students will receive information that will help them understand and prepare military correspondence (the Army Writing Style). Leadership Laboratory training to include thorough indoctrination in military courtesy and customs of the service, drill experience, development of initiative and self-confidence.
  
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    ROTC 101L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 101)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 101 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 102 - Introduction to the Army (2 credits)


    A discussion of the mission and responsibilities of the United States Military Forces in support of National Security with emphasis on the role of the individual, participating citizen. Students will be introduced to Map Reading Techniques. Leadership Laboratory is a continuation of ROTC 101L .
  
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    ROTC 102L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 102)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 102 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 201 - Fundamentals of Military Leadership (3 credits)


    A detailed study of the applicability of leadership principles, traits, and techniques in all job areas. Additionally, an appreciation is developed for leadership counseling techniques. The course culminates in an overview of Army organization.
  
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    ROTC 201L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 201)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 201 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 202 - Fundamentals of Military Decision Making (3 credits)


    A detailed study of orienteering to include basic fundamentals of map reading, grid systems, scale and distance, elevation and relief, military symbols, direction and location, and utilization of the declination diagram. Additionally, students will discuss the code of conduct, the principles of war and reinforce preparation of military correspondence.
  
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    ROTC 202L - Basic Leadership Laboratory (Credit included with lecture - ROTC 202)


    Leadership Lab is in conjunction with ROTC 202 . It is a period which supplements and reinforces, through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science courses. Leadership Lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army.
  
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    ROTC 301 - Advanced Military Decision Making (3 credits)


    How to prepare and conduct military training, to include presentation and communication techniques. Included in this phase of instruction is a 10-minute oral presentation, how to cope with basic problems, i.e., discipline and motivation, encountered in small units, leadership training designed to further develop planning and organizational skills, fundamentals of offensive and defensive tactics of war. F.
  
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    ROTC 302 - Applied Military Leadership (3 credits)


    A review of the principles and fundamentals of small unit tactics, and the application of the principles of offensive and defensive combat to units of the infantry battalion. Familiarization with characteristics, operation and employment of small unit weapons, communication systems and equipment, and continued development of selected Military Skills. Orientation relative to administrative procedures, required standards of performance, and general conduct of training at Warrior Forge, the Leadership Development, and Assessment Course. S.
  
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    ROTC 401 - Leadership Management Seminar I (3 credits)


    Leadership management and professional development, a study of the U.S. Army Personnel Management System, methods of conducting Command and Staff and Unit meetings, how to prepare military correspondence, ethics and professionalism, and military justice. F.
  
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    ROTC 401L - Leadership and Management Seminar I Laboratory (0 credits)


    Leadership lab is in conjunction with each leadership and management seminar class. It is a period which supplements and reinforces through practical application, the fundamentals taught in each of the Military Science classes. Leadership lab is a progressive learning experience designed to produce effective and efficient Second Lieutenants for the United States Army. F.
  
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    ROTC 402 - Leadership Management Seminar II (3 credits)


    Management simulation exercise and Active Duty orientation, small unit effectiveness and Army Training Management, the U.S. Army Logistics system, interpersonal skills, counseling techniques, and personnel evaluation, the Law and Principles of War, Code of Conduct and Geneva Convention, customs and courtesies of an Army officer. S.

Russian

  
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    RUSS 110 - Introductory Russian I (3 credits)


    Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S, Su.
  
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    RUSS 120 - Introductory Russian II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RUSS 110 ) A continuation of RUSS 110 . Further development of language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S, Su.
  
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    RUSS 130 - Introductory Russian III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: RUSS 120 ) Further development of fundamentals language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.

Science

  
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    SCIE 100 - Scientific Vessel Operations (0 credits)


    An introduction to the theory of electronic, celestial and dead reckoning navigation with each applied to practical problems in the laboratory and at sea. An introduction to boating safety, boat handling, rules of the road, minor repairs, and use of research boats as marine sampling platforms are presented and applied.
  
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    SCIE 101 - Introduction to Science (3 credits)


    (Coreq: SCIE 101L ) An introduction to the processes of science for non-science majors using the environment as a basic theme. The course, specifically designed to be the first university-level science course, draws on illustrations from all of the sciences on how to understand science and its integration into students’ lives and careers. Three lecture hours per week. F, S.
  
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    SCIE 101L - Introduction to Science Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: SCIE 101 ) Experiments, exercises, demonstrations and field experiences emphasizing the topics presented in SCIE 101 . F, S.

Sociology

  
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    SOC 101 - Introductory Sociology (3 credits)


    An introduction to the sociological study of social interaction, social structures, social institutions, social inequalities, social change, the social construction of human life, and other selected topics. Sociology draws upon a variety of social scientific research methods, sociological concepts and social theory to reveal the social basis of everyday life by exploring the interplay between society and the individual. F, S.
  
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    SOC 102 - Social Problems (3 credits)


    Analysis of social structures and processes relating to public issues in contemporary society. F, S.
  
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    SOC 201 - Sociological Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course will provide an introduction to the principles of sociology as well as emphasize written and oral communication skills. Students will be asked to exercise and develop their “sociological imagination” through a series of oral and written assignments. F, S.
  
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    SOC 298 - Careers and Professional Development in Gerontology (1 credit)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course introduces students to areas of specialization in gerontology and career opportunities within the discipline and related disciplines. This course explores the variety of resources available on the internet and in the University Career Resources Services office in order to assist students to find jobs or enter graduate schools after graduation. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 300 Q* - Social Justice (3 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course explores the broad context of social justice and fosters critical reflection and analysis of the social world and conditions of humanity. This course also explores individual and collective resistance for change and promotes students’ self-discovery of their own change agent skills. The course is guided by three primary questions: 1) What is social justice? 2) Why does social justice matter? 3) How do we actively participate in the struggle for social justice? Students taking Q* sections of this course receive four credit hours and must complete an additional 40-hour experiential learning activity. F, S.
  
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    SOC 301 - Gender and Society (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course examines gender in terms of men’s and women’s identities and normative behaviors that occur in gendered institutions within an inequitable, patriarchal social structure that allots power and privilege to men over women, across all classes and races. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 305 - Sociology of the Family (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Sociological perspectives related to various aspects of family behaviors, roles and values. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 306 - Religious Cults and Violence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) An introduction to sociological perspectives related to various aspects of new religious movements or cults. Students will use sociological theories and perspectives to examine religious cults’ use of violence and violent reactions toward cults by government authorities, other religious organizations, and anti-cult movements. S, even years.
  
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    SOC 307 - Sociology of Religion (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Sociological perspectives related to various aspects of religious behavior. Includes references to non-Western religions. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 308 Q* - Community Development and Social Change (3 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) opment models and the history of community development practices. Students learn hands-on skills that will prepare them for work in community-based organizations and institutions. Students enrolled in “Q” sections of the course must complete a required community service learning component with a local community organization and will receive 4 credit hours for the class. S.
  
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    SOC 309 - Social Inequality (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The course provides a social scientific overview of how individual experiences in social reality are unequal given the stratified nature of the world. Historical trends in inequalities and contemporary hierarchical social arrangements are examined. A focus of the course is how different forms of inequality are maintained and replicated via individual behaviors and the operation of different socio-cultural institutions. Also analyzed are the efforts to challenge unjust inequalities within communities, and nation-states worldwide. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 309L Q* - Social Inequality Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) (Coreq: SOC 309 ) Qualified students taking Social Inequality (SOC 309 ) may make the course an experiential learning experience (Q) by incorporating weekly participation with an established organization or program that serves socio-economically disadvantaged individuals. F, S, Su.
  
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    SOC 310 - Social Demography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , SOC 201 , and core curriculum math requirement) Analysis of the theories, methods, issues, and data related to the characteristics and dynamics of population. F, S.
  
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    SOC 311 - Sociology of Poverty (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) A sociological analysis of who the poor are with a specific emphasis on rural America. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 313 - Social Welfare and Social Work (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Analysis of the theory and process of social services. Emphasis is placed on understanding major social service programs in the United States, their histories, trends, and public policy related to them. Students study specific social welfare programs such as income maintenance programs, social security, nutrition programs and others. The occupation of social work is addressed along with major debates regarding providers and consumers of services. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 315 - Educational Justice (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course explores the institution of education in the United States from a social justice perspective. Topics include the history of educational inequalities, standardized testing, tracking, school choice, and school funding. The course also explores race, class, and gender disparities in access to both high quality schooling and higher education. The course addresses ways in which education policies at the local, state, and federal levels have historically ameliorated or exasperated inequalities and how education can be used as an instrument for social justice and social change.
  
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    SOC 320 - Individual and Society (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101 ) Selected theoretical orientations, methodological procedures and illustrative substantive data pertaining to the relations between the individual and society. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 325 - Qualitative Research (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This is a survey course about qualitative or non-statistical research methods including (but not limited to) observational studies, ethnography, participatory research, case studies, interviewing and content analysis. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 330 - Sociological Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Theoretical perspectives on society and social behavior. F, S.
  
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    SOC 331 Q* - Methods in the Social Sciences (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; SOC 201 ) (Coreq: SOC 331L ) Introduction to the methods and problems involved in designing and conducting research in sociology and related fields. F, S.
  
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    SOC 331L - Methods in the Social Sciences Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; SOC 201 ) (Coreq: SOC 331 ) Exercises and assignments to supplement the material presented in SOC 331 . F, S.
  
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    SOC 340 - The Sociology of Drugs & Drug Control Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) A sociological examination of drug use, misuse and abuse within the historical context of social policies in the United States. A global perspective will also be considered. F, odd years.
  
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    SOC 341 - Organized Crime (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This seminar is organized as a survey of organized crime worldwide. While this course will focus on organized crime in the United States, we will also examine organized crime and organized crime groups around the world. Integral to this large scope is a focus on the historical development of the ideas surrounding organized crime. Additionally, in this course we will examine some of the strategies used to combat often unique forms of criminality. S, odd years.
  
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    SOC 350 Q* - Juvenile Delinquency (3 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The causes and consequences of juvenile delinquency and the study of the juvenile justice system. Students enrolled in “Q” sections of the course must complete a required community service learning component with a local community organization and will receive 4 credit hours for the class. S.
  
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    SOC 351 - Deviant Behavior (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The causes and consequences of deviant behavior in society, including such topics as mental illness, privileged deviance, drugs and alcohol, personal violence, and body modification.
  
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    SOC 352 - Comparative Policing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Comparative study of policing organizations in the U.S. and selected foreign countries from a social science perspective. Formal/informal policing; role/functions; legal bases; accountability /restraints; community relations; use of force; and illegal practices will be covered. We will examine how the political systems of different countries influence the way governments police their own citizens. S, odd years.
  
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    SOC 353 - Criminology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Social factors in the development, identification, and treatment of criminals. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 355 Q* - Race and Ethnicity (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) A socio-historical, theoretical, and empirical analysis of race and ethnicity, with primary emphasis on U.S. relations and trends. Cultural, political, and economic relationships on the basis of race/ethnicity are examined. Issues of prejudice, discrimination, and racism are explored as well as strategies for individual and collective action that promote equality and social justice for all races/ethnicities. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 357 - African American Communities (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , junior standing, or permission of the instructor) This course is a sociological approach to understanding African American communities, both in historic and contemporary eras. We seek to understand how structure and agency and/or oppression and resistance have given rise and shape to various facets of African American and Black communities. We pay attention to how people of African descent have worked to protect their communities, to raise their standards of living and opportunities, and have actively fought racism. The readings are a range of first person narratives, social commentary and sociological perspectives on issues such as family, faith, popular culture, and politics. Through this course you will come to understand the evolution from enslaved African, to Negro, to Black, to African American, and to the contemporary questions of who is Black and what is Blackness. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 361 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , or permission of the instructor) This course introduces students to the social determinants of health and illness. Students will examine the social, economic, and political factors that shape the health of individuals, groups, and communities. A key focus will be on patterns of inequity in health, including an exploration of the way social class, gender, race/ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation influence health-related behaviors and impact access to quality health care. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 362 - Medical Sociology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; or permission of the instructor) This course introduces students to sociological research and theory related to medical practice and medical professionals. Students will explore the connection between medicine and other important social institutions in our society, and will examine the way medical knowledge and policy shapes and is shaped by the society in which it develops. Emphasis will be placed on the social structure of hospitals, the social and cultural factors that influence patient-provider interactions, and contemporary debates regarding health care delivery systems. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 380 - Collective Action and Social Movements (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Using a sociological frame of analysis, this course explores distinctions between collective action and social movements, conditions that facilitate their development, and their impact on social, cultural, and political policies. A wide variety of social movements in American society are examined, including the Progressive era reform movements, the labor movement, the women’s movement, the environmental movement, the gay rights movement, the civil rights and other racial/ethnic movements. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 395 - Internship Experience in Sociology (0 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , permission of the instructor, and approved contract) Interns work in a supervised position in a human services, governmental, research or criminal justice agency. If desired, a student may register for SOC 499  in subsequent semesters and be awarded credit at the rate of 1 credit for every 33 hours of supervised internship. May, Su.
  
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    SOC 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; written contract between the student and the instructor, approved by the chair of the psychology and sociology department)
  
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    SOC 401 - Sociology of Corrections (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course provides a sociological view of the rationales for corrections, types of corrections, and considerations for prisoner reentry. Students will gain a broad understanding of the history of corrections, and the effects of that history on both the individual and the community. F or S.
  
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    SOC 403 - Sociology of Sports (3 credits)


    (=RSM 400 ) (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The goal of this class is to apply a sociological lens to the world of sports and athletics (a distinction that will be examined) through the incorporation of academic writing, popular media, and personal experiences and observations. F, even years.
 

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