Jun 29, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Sociology

  
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    SOC 450 - Victimology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , or permission of the instructor) Examination of sociological theories, research, and methodologies in the study of victims and analysis of the growth and institutionalization of victim advocacy. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 454 - Sociology of Death and Dying (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) This course focuses on the social construction of dying and death in our society as well as the ways societal expectations, values, and norms influence practices and beliefs about death. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 455 - Sociology of Aging (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Analysis of aging as a problem of socialization and the status of older people in society, their roles in the community, demographic aspects of aging, and the impact of aging upon social institutions. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 457 - Aging and Social Policy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , PSYC 101  or permission of the instructor) The development of public policy related to aging. Basic policy concepts, models, and methodology along with specific issues of the elderly. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 460 - Sociology of Mental Health (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Social factors in the development, identification and treatment of mental illness. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 465 - Sociology of AIDS (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , junior standing or permission of the instructor) A seminar for advanced undergraduates, this course involves student research on HIV/AIDS transmission, incidence, prevalence, and prevention worldwide and analyzes HIV/AIDS within the framework of social stratification, social movements, social deviance, social control, and international development. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 470 - Sociology of the South (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 , junior standing or permission of the instructor) SOC 470 focuses on social, cultural, historical, economic, racial and demographic dimensions of the American South. Class members will conduct research and study how the South is distinct and the ways the South influences and shares the broader American society. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 480 Q* - Environmental Sociology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102  and junior standing; or permission of the instructor) The course examines key issues in the relationship between society and the natural environment. The primary focus is on social structural and cultural factors behind environmental and resource problems. Attention, however, is also given to social consequences of environmental degradation (e.g., social and economic disruption) and to social responses to environmental and resource problems (e.g., change in culture/attitudes about environmental issues, the environmental movement, community mobilization against threats). This course is a service learning course that requires 15 hours of fieldwork. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 495 - Gerontology Internship (3 credits)


    (=PSYC 495 ) (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ; PSYC 423  and three additional Gerontology Program courses) The internship provides experience working with both well and frail older persons and requires a minimum of 104 hours with an approved agency. The internship is supervised by the program director and an on-site professional with a specialized terminal degree and/or significant demonstrated experience. Contracts outlining practicum requirements must be written and approved by the host agency, the director of the gerontology program, and the chair of the Department of Psychology and Sociology. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 496 Q* - Senior Capstone Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: minimum GPA of 2.5, SOC 330 , SOC 331 , STAT 201 /STAT 201L  or equivalent statistics course; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: SOC 496L ) Under a sociologist’s supervision each student proposes and completes an internship with a non-profit organization or government agency that complements their educational and career goals. F, S.
  
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    SOC 496L - Internship Capstone Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: minimum GPA of 2.5, SOC 330 , SOC 331 , STAT 201 /STAT 201L  or equivalent statistics course; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: SOC 496 ) Exercises and assignments supplement the material presented in SOC 496Q*. F, S.
  
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    SOC 497 Q* - Senior Thesis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 330 SOC 331 , and STAT 201 /STAT 201L  or equivalent statistics course; all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) (Coreq: SOC 497L ) Each student plans and executes an original research project under a sociologist’s supervision. F, S.
  
  
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    SOC 498 Q* - Topics in Sociology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) Reading and research on selected subjects in sociology. Open only to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor. Offered as needed.
  
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    SOC 499 Q* - Internship (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: SOC 101  or SOC 102 ) The internship requires 90 or more hours of collegiate credit with a GPA of 2.5 or better; formal application with a resume, and a contract among the Internship agency, the student, and the department. The application process must be completed by the last day of classes of the semester prior to the internship.) Interns work a minimum of 100 hours in a human services, governmental, research, or criminal justice agency and write a paper analyzing their work experiences in light of classroom learning and knowledge. Students may take up to 9 credit hours of Sociology Internships. Offered as needed.

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 110 - Introductory Spanish (3 credits)


    Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with additional consideration of culture.
  
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    SPAN 111 - Introductory Spanish I - II (Intensive) (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, with additional consideration of culture. Intensive review of first and second semester Spanish language course intended for students with two years of high school Spanish with an average grade of ‘B’ or better, or by placement. SPAN 111 and SPAN 130  must be taken in sequence and completed with appropriate grades to fulfill Goal 5-A of the Core Curriculum. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 115 - Hispanic Studies I (5 credits)


    This class introduces students to the Spanish language and the many facets of Hispanic cultures. This course also helps students develop the basic skills of speaking, listening, and communicating in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures. As a hybrid course, three credit hours is delivered face-to-face and two hours via a distance learning format. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 120 - Introductory Spanish II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 110  or by placement) A continuation of SPAN 110 . Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture.
  
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    SPAN 130 - Introductory Spanish III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 115  or SPAN 120 , SPAN 111 , or by placement) Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 210 - Hispanic Studies II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 115 , SPAN 130 , or by placement) The course refines oral abilities introduced in SPAN 115  or SPAN 130 , developing language skills related to speaking and listening up to a novice low-mid proficiency (cf. ACTFL) necessary for communicating in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures. It also continues exposing students to the many facets of Hispanic cultures in general. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    SPAN 211 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in North America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 , or by placement) The course focuses on the refinement of oral abilities addressed in SPAN 210 and promotes the development of speaking and listening skills at the novice high level of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). It emphasizes communication in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures, with a special focus on the many facets of Hispanic cultures in North America. Required for work in upper-level language and culture courses. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 235 - Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) This course provides an introduction to Hispanic Linguistics and establishes the basis for future application of linguistic principles. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 255 - Spanish Conversation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Develops an intermediate proficiency in Spanish oral skills and an appreciation of Hispanic cultures through contact with materials taken from original sources. Emphasis on the improvement and refinement of pronunciation skills. Listening and discussion of a variety of materials of appropriate difficulty. S.
  
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    SPAN 315 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in South America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) The course focuses on the grammar review and writing practice and promotes the development of speaking and listening skills at the intermediate low level of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). It emphasizes communication in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures, with a special focus on the many facets of Hispanic cultures in South America. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 320 - Spanish for the Professions (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Study of the applied nature of the language focusing on the cultural aspects and specialized vocabulary of a given professional field. Emphasis on developing skills to ask and answer questions relating to a particular professional field, drafting relevant documents, and describing events that may arise in the practice of the profession. The following are among the possible professional fields on which the course will focus: a) Spanish for Business; b) Spanish for Health Professions; c) Spanish for Public Safety; d) Spanish for the Travel and Tourism Industry.
  
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    SPAN 321 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in Central America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) The course focuses on the refinement of oral abilities addressed in SPAN 315  and promotes the development of speaking and listening skills at the intermediate mid proficiency, according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). It emphasizes communication in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures, with a special focus on the many facets of Hispanic cultures in Central America. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 322 - Latin American Literature in Translation (3 credits)


    (=ENGL 322 ) (Prereq: for Spanish credit: SPAN 210 ) Selected readings of Latin American Literature in translation. Students write primarily critical essays. All readings are in English.
  
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    SPAN 323 - Spanish for Business and Tourism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) This course provides students with linguistic skills necessary to discuss business concepts and the tourism industry in Spanish. Emphasis is placed on developing the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in the context of business situations. Special consideration is devoted to acquiring an appreciation and understanding of Hispanic culture in the business world.
  
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    SPAN 326 - Cuban Literature in Translation (1 to 3 credits)


    (=LATS 326 ) (Prereq: SPAN 130  and permission of the instructor) (Coreq: Travel/study in Cuba) Selected readings in Cuban literature in translation. Students will read, research and write on Cuban literature, society and culture. A non-refundable deposit is required upon registration.
  
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    SPAN 330 - Approaches to Hispanic Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Introductory exploration of selected topics in language, literature and culture. Topics are chosen for their significance and impact on Hispanic cultures. Course taught in Spanish. This course may be repeated once for credit under different topics. Su.
  
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    SPAN 333 - Topics in Language, Literature, and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) Selective study of topics in the language, literature, and culture of Latin America and Spain. Course format includes reading assignments, lectures, discussion, oral and written reports. Topics vary.
  
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    SPAN 340 - Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 210 ) A study of the historical development and various cultural manifestations of the Spanish, Latin American, and contemporary Hispanic civilization.
  
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    SPAN 345 - Spanish through Art (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) A select study of the most relevant socio-historical and cultural periods of Spain and Latin America as represented in painting masterpieces from the Baroque period to the contemporary era. Class format includes intensive conversations and continued development of reading and writing skills. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish. F.
  
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    SPAN 350 - Spanish Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Approval from the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies faculty) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment.
  
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    SPAN 355 - Spanish Morphology and Syntax (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 235  or equivalent) The course examines the internal structure of words and the rules by which word formation takes place, and provides a thorough study of Spanish grammar from a formal perspective. It examines the relationship between syntax and morphology by considering the effects that some morphological processes have on syntax. It also considers the phrase structure properties of Spanish. F.
  
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    SPAN 360 - Studies in Hispanic Poetry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) Selected topics in Hispanic poetry. This course is designed to develop students’ appreciation of poetry and to develop critical approaches to poetic texts. Periods covered may include the following: Renaissance and Baroque Poetry of Spain, Modern Spanish Poetry, and Poetry of Latin America from Modernism to the present.
  
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    SPAN 380 - Studies in World Film (3 credits)


    This course is a survey of world film with an emphasis on Hispanic cinema. It provides a general introduction to contemporary film-critical discourses which are currently under the rubric of film semiotics. Key elements of the language of cinema are studied with the goal of developing both critical and creative skills. Taught in English.
  
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    SPAN 399 - Independent Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: a written contract between students and instructor for a special topic dealing with Spanish language or culture, and approved by the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts) May not be used to satisfy the Spanish Minor Core.
  
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    SPAN 410 - Spanish Peninsular Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 340 ) A survey of the major literary works of Spain from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century.
  
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    SPAN 411 - Spanish American Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 340 ) A survey of the major literary works of Spanish American from pre-Columbian times through the twentieth century.
  
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    SPAN 430 - Spanish Linguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 340 ) Study of modern Spanish with attention to the application of linguistic theory to the effective teaching of Spanish.
  
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    SPAN 431 - Spanish and Hispanic Cultures in Spain and the Caribbean (3 credits)


    (Writing Intensive) (Prereq: SPAN 211 ) The course refines oral abilities reviewed in SPAN 321 , developing language skills related to speaking and listening up to an intermediate high proficiency, according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), necessary for communicating in everyday situations in Hispanic cultures. It also continues exposing students to the many facets of Hispanic cultures in the Caribbean and Spain. F, S.
  
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    SPAN 435 - Spanish English Contrasts (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 355 ) This course offers insights into Spanish phonology, morphology, syntax and lexicon as seen through the eyes of an English-speaking learner of Spanish. It proposes an in-depth study of Spanish linguistic structures and its implications for language teaching and translation. S.
  
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    SPAN 460 - Writing for Advanced Spanish (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 315 ) This course provides students all the tools they need to write successfully in Spanish in academic and non-academic settings, and to become better writers both inside and outside the Spanish classroom. Class format includes intensive writing and continued development of reading and writing skills. Reading ability will be developed as a means to improve writing. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish. F.
  
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    SPAN 480 - Capstone: Advanced Topics in Literature and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: SPAN 340  or equivalent) Intensive study and analysis of a notable author or authors, literary trends or selected cultural topics. Emphasis may be placed on one or more of the various forms of artistic, cultural or linguistic expressions. Consolidate and further the skills developed in the Spanish major.
  
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    SPAN 495 - Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the department chair) This is a guided internship and requires 120 hours of outside work, a journal, and a final evaluation paper. Students must have permission of the department chair before applying for internship. Application for the internship can be obtained without receiving permission from the department chair. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course’s objective, requirements, and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties - the student faculty supervisor, chair of the department, and the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization by the coordinator of internships.

Statistics

  
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    STAT 201 - Elementary Statistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in MATH 130 , MATH 130I , or MATH 139 ) (Coreq: STAT 201L ) An introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistical methods. Topics include descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, random variables and sampling distribution, linear regression and correlation, testing of hypothesis concerning one and two population samples, confidence interval estimation of parameters and introduction to one way ANOVA (analysis of variance). Primarily for students in the field of science who need basic knowledge of statistics. Students may not receive credit for this course if credit has been received from any of the following courses: CBAD 291 , or PSYC 225 . F, S, Su.
  
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    STAT 201L - Elementary Statistics Computer Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: STAT 201 ) The computer laboratory involves exercises and/or lectures accompanying STAT 201 . Students will use various statistical software. Laboratory exercises are designed to analyze data using appropriate tests/methods introduced in STAT 201 . F, S, Su.
  
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    STAT 315 - Regression Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: STAT 201 , CBAD 291 , or PSYC 225  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course, which provides an in-depth coverage of regression analysis, is suitable as a second course in statistics. Topics include correlation, simple and multiple linear regression, method of least squares, model building and diagnostic checking, hypothesis testing, outliers, influence, multicollinearity, transformations, categorical regressors, and logistic regression. Examples and case studies are drawn from the sciences and business. Computers and statistical software will be used extensively. F, odd years.
  
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    STAT 316 - Experimental Design I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: STAT 201 , CBAD 291 , or PSYC 225  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course offers in depth coverage of one and two way ANOVA. Topics include model statements, assumption checks and remedial measures, inference for factor level and treatment level means, inference for contrasts and multiple testing, and treatment of interaction terms. Computers and statistical software will be used extensively. F.
  
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    STAT 317 - Nonparametric Statistical Methods (3 credits)


    (Prereq: STAT 201 , CBAD 291 , or PSYC 225  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Topics include nonparametric analogues to t- and F-tests, ANOVA, regression and correlation, goodness of fit tests, tests of independence, and measures of association. Computers and statistical software will be used extensively. S, even years.
  
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    STAT 318 - Applied Statistical Methods (3 credits)


    (Prereq: STAT 201 , CBAD 291 , or PSYC 225  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course covers issues and methods for biological, marine and health sciences. Topics include study design, hypothesis testing, linear models, multivariate methods, analysis of rates and proportions, analysis of survival data, logistic regression, and log-linear models. Examples and case studies are drawn from biology, marine science and health-related fields. Computers and statistical software will be used extensively. S.
  
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    STAT 319 - Categorical Data Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: STAT 201 , CBAD 291 , or PSYC 225  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A first course in the analysis of discrete data including two-dimensional tables, the log linear model, goodness-of-fit of the model, measures of dependence, three and higher dimensional tables, hierarchical models, model selection, ordered categories, logit model, and introduction to Bayesian analysis of categorical data. Computers and statistical software will be used extensively. S, odd years.
  
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    STAT 320 - Experimental Design II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in STAT 316 ) This course offers advanced topics in experimental design. These topics include, but are not limited to, split plot designs, repeated measures, nested designs, advanced topics in block designs, and advanced topics in factorial designs. Computers and statistical software will be used extensively. S.
  
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    STAT 321 - SAS Basics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: STAT 201  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course covers topics that are tested on the SAS Certified Base Programmer exam. Topics include, but are not limited to, importing and exporting raw data files, manipulating and transforming of data sets, combining SAS data sets and creating summary reports using SAS procedures. Computers and statistical software are used extensively. S.
  
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    STAT 399 - Independent Study/Internship in Statistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: STAT 412 ) Directed study of specific topics or supervised work as part of an approved internship. F.
  
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    STAT 412 - Statistical Inference I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in MATH 161 ) Sample spaces, probability, random variables, distributions. S.
  
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    STAT 413 - Statistical Inference II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in STAT 412 ) Point and interval estimation, tests of hypothesis, limiting distributions, order statistics. Offered as needed.
  
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    STAT 419 - Actuarial Mathematics I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in STAT 412  or permission of the instructor) Survival distributions and life tables, life insurance, annuities, benefit analysis risk theory. Offered as needed.
  
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    STAT 420 - Statistical Computing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in STAT 412 , or STAT 201  and grade of ‘C’ or better in MATH 161 ) This course introduces key topics in statistical programming including techniques for random number generation, Monte-Carlo and MCMC methods, and bootstrapping. S, even years.

Swain Scholars

  
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    SWNS 301 - Swain Scholars I (1 credit)


    (Prereq: must be a current Swain Scholar) Preparatory classroom experiences to improve the capacity of Swain Scholars to impact community health by engaging in health promotion outreach activities in conjunction with local health agencies. This class is automatically offered for honors credit.
  
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    SWNS 302 - Swain Scholars II (2 credits)


    (Prereq: must be a current Swain Scholar) Second phase of Swain Scholars program to focus on implementation of community health outreach activities. Community health outreach will address an area of identified need with one or more community partners. Scholars provide outreach service and education of specified community sites and in the Coastal Carolina University community. This class is automatically offered for honors credit.
  
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    SWNS 401 - Swain Scholars III: Community Health Education Initiative (1 credit)


    (Prereq: must be a current Swain Scholar) Leadership and mentoring experiences to increase capacity of Swain Scholars to improve community health. Swain Scholars will engage in either a health-related research based track with a Coastal Carolina University faculty member or a project-based track with a health-related agency. This class is automatically offered for honors credit. F.
  
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    SWNS 402 - Swain Scholars IV: Community Health Education Initiative (2 credits)


    (Prereq: must be a current Swain Scholar) Continuation of leadership, mentoring, and supervised research or outreach-based project to improve community health. Emphasis will be placed on building the capacity of Swain Scholars to conduct health-related research and articulate findings. This class is automatically offered for honors credit. S.

Teaching Fellows Program

  
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    TFP 102 - Teaching Fellows Special Topics in Education Seminar (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Teaching Fellow Status and UNIV 110 -or equivalent) This course focuses on the study of leadership and the leadership skills of effective leaders and teachers. Topics include leadership styles, valuing diversity, defining leadership in the community/classroom, and factors that influence/contribute to effective teacher leadership. Pass/Fail grading only. S.
  
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    TFP 201 - Teaching Fellows Special Topics in Education Seminar (0-1 credits)


    (Prereq: Teaching Fellows status and TFP 102 ) This course focuses on the study of leadership and the leadership skills of effective leaders and teachers. Topics include leadership styles, valuing diversity, defining leadership in the community/classroom, and factors that influence/contribute to effective teacher leadership. Pass/Fail grading only. F.
  
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    TFP 202 Q - Molding and Enriching the Teacher Leader (0 to 1 credit)


    (Prereq: TFP 102 , TFP 201 , and permission of the instructor) This course focuses on the study of leadership and the leadership skills of effective leaders and teachers. Topics include qualities of an effective teacher, classroom management strategies, how to give constructive feedback in the classroom, decision making based on students’ needs, and identifying qualities of leadership in preservice teachers. S.
  
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    TFP 301 Q - Building Multi-Cultural Experiences and Language Acquisition Skills in Teacher Leaders (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: TFP 102 , TFP 201 , TFP 202 , and permission of the instructor) A continuation of the study of leadership and the leadership skills of effective leaders and teachers. This course focuses on the study of leadership and the leadership skills of effective leaders and teachers. Topics will include ways to: assist the development of English language learners, work with diverse populations, appreciate different cultural and economic backgrounds, and promote multicultural awareness as it will relate to future classroom experience. S.

Theater

  
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    THEA 100 - Common Hour (0 credits)


    Weekly meetings for theatre and musical theatre majors to discuss theatre issues including but not limited to audition strategies, head shots, career options and planning, workshop opportunities, etc. F, S.
  
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    THEA 101 - Introduction to Theatre Art (3 credits)


    Understanding and criticism of dramatic literature, history, and production. F, S.
  
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    THEA 114 - Fundamentals of Dance (2 credits)


    Introduction to Dance is an entry level course in ballet and jazz dance techniques, geared toward the student who has spent little to no time in the study of dance. The class will incorporate warm-up, physical conditioning and stamina training, as well as the basics of partner dancing and dance audition techniques. This course may be repeated up to three times for credit. F.
  
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    THEA 130 - Principles of Dramatic Analysis (3 credits)


    (=THEA 130H ) This course is designed to cultivate students understanding of contemporary cultural/literary theories, critical evaluation, analysis, and interpretation of dramatic literature and performance. The class emphasizes traditional and non-traditional canons of dramatic literature, traditional structures and forms of drama and cultural arguments within their literary, historical and philosophical contexts.
  
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    THEA 142 - The Speaking Voice (3 credits)


    The course is designed to develop a clear and expressive speaking voice for performance and communication. Work includes exercises to reduce tension, enhance confidence, increase clarity and improve the quality of the voice. Learning is accomplished though conceptual study (reading, discussion, writing assignments and/or tests), in-class exercises, individual practice, and performance of text.
  
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    THEA 149 - Acting for Non-Majors (3 credits)


    Introduction to acting through exercises, improvisations and scene study that involve public performance as well as the development of communication skills.
  
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    THEA 150 - Acting I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Acting I is a studio course in the foundational techniques of acting. The course explores the demands and conventions of realistic acting. Using a variety of individual and group exercises the student will develop actor skills through exploration of work on the self and work on the role. Students will create and develop character using vocal and physical exploration, script analysis, and the active pursuit of objectives among others. Participants in this course will perform improvisations, monologues and scenes. Written work will include character analyses, text analyses, and critical review of outside performances. S.
  
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    THEA 153 - Introduction to Theatre Technology (3 credits)


    Students will be introduced to emerging technology unique to the live entertainment industry including lighting, sound, projection, video and show control. The class will focus on installation technique, basic systems operational control theory, and electrical theory. Lectures in conjunction with lab exercises provide students with the skills required to install and operate basic live entertainment technology. S.
  
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    THEA 154 - Introduction to Costuming (3 credits)


    Basic principles of costume design and construction and survey of selected historical periods in costume history.
  
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    THEA 155 - Stagecraft (3 credits)


    A beginning course in the principles and practice of stagecraft.
  
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    THEA 160 - Acting I Studio (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 150 ) Acting I Studio is a studio based course that builds upon the learned vocabulary in Acting I by applying the acting training to selected monologues. Students will investigate the actor’s work in research, preparation for rehearsal and application of techniques to a series of monologues. Students work will be showcased in a Spring Monologue Showcase. S.
  
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    THEA 171 - Stage Auditions (1 credit)


    A beginning study of audition methods, including material selection, role preparation, and casting presentation.
  
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    THEA 174 - Ballet I (2 credits)


    Introduction to the techniques of classical ballet including alignment, positions, port de bras, and center combinations.
  
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    THEA 175 - Jazz I (2 credits)


    Introduction to the style, technique, and rhythmic structures of Jazz dance.
  
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    THEA 176 - Tap I (2 credits)


    Introduction to the fundamental principles of tap.
  
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    THEA 201 - World Performance Traditions (3 credits)


    This course will document and trace the phenomenon of performances as a part of human culture. Observing the earliest roots of performance in ancient societies, the course will follow the evolution of performance as realized through storytelling, theatre, dance, musical performance and other representational modes.
  
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    THEA 212 - Music Skills for Actors (2 credits)


    (Prereq: MUS 170  and MUS 171 ) Restricted to BFA Musical Theatre majors and by permission of the instructor. This course is designed to build and refine your musicianship, the ability to hear, perceive, understand, learn, and perform music. Specific focus will be placed on the practical applications of both aural and visual music theory skills commonly seen in the world of musical theatre. Basic and advanced rhythmic exercises, sight-singing, rhythmic, melodic and harmonic dictation, and tonal harmony will all be studied within the confines of musical theatre. F.
  
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    THEA 220 - Theatre Laboratory (1 credit)


    Supervised participation in theatre production. No formal class meetings. This course may be repeated for credit, but no more than four credits may be applied toward the departmental major. F, S.
  
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    THEA 221 - Laboratory, Musical Theatre Performance (1 credit)


    Supervised performance in musical theatre production or music ensemble.
  
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    THEA 230 - Complete Stage Makeup (2 credits)


    An introduction to the complexities of makeup, this course is specially designed to require the student to become familiar with basic makeup procedures and complex prosthetic makeup application, and will culminate in the student’s application in his or her projects.
  
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    THEA 240 - Voice and Diction (3 credits)


    The analysis, evaluation, and improvement of speech through a study of the anatomy and physiology of the vocal mechanism, voice production, and articulation. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet as a means of improving diction.
  
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    THEA 242 - Vocal Production for the Actor (3 credits)


    (Prereq: B.F.A. Program only or by permission of the instructor) A course in experiential learning, conceptual study and performance to develop the actor’s ability to reveal thought and emotion through the voice. Students will engage in exercises to improve breathing, resonance, range and clarity for the purposes of reducing tension to free the voice for creative expression.
  
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    THEA 245 - Introduction to Physical Theatre (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 250 ) Introduction to Physical Theatre is a studio based course that expands upon the foundations learned in Acting I, Acting I: Studio, Acting II and Acting II: Studio. Students are provided with an opportunity to develop sensitivity, intelligence and strength as physical theatre performers through ongoing practice and exposure to a variety of physical theatre and movement techniques. Students will learn to use compositional tools, develop physically inspired characters and interact with environmental elements through performer-created projects.
  
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    THEA 250 - Acting II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 160 ) A studio course that expands upon the foundations learned in Acting I. The course explores the fundamental techniques of realistic acting through the theories and writings of theatre visionaries such as Konstantin Stanislavski and Uta Hagen. Actors are challenged to apply their knowledge of acting technique through investigation of a shared vocabulary as applied to text. Text analysis will be covered through the investigation of plays from the American Realist genre. This course combines class exercises and scene work to deepen the understanding and playing of action in the realistic mode. F.
  
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    THEA 254 - Rendering for the Theatre (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103 ) (Coreq: ARTS 112 ) Introduction to the variety of techniques used to render designs for the stage. Students will learn to communicate their ideas visually through exercises in advanced perspective drawing, painting, costume sketches, and model making. S.
  
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    THEA 255 - Computer Aided Drafting and Design (3 credits)


    (Coreq: THEA 154  or THEA 155 ) An introduction to drafting on the computer. Students will learn how to use basic computer drafting commands to input information, organize, layout of 2D and 3D drafting, with an emphasis on drafting for the theater and entertainment industries. F.
  
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    THEA 260 - Acting II Studio (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 250 , B.F.A. program only, or by permission of the instructor) A studio based course that explores the transformative nature of character development. The integration of character-specific movement, vocal work and personalization are given special attention. Students progress toward integrating the analytical and intuitive components of acting through the rehearsal of selected scenes. S.
  
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    THEA 274 - Ballet II (2 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 174  or permission of the instructor) Intermediate/advanced level training in ballet. This course may be repeated one time for credit.
  
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    THEA 276 - Jazz II (2 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 175  or permission of the instructor) Continued training in Jazz dance at the intermediate/ advanced level. This course may be repeated one time for credit.
  
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    THEA 277 - Tap Dance II (2 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 176  or permission of the instructor) Continued training in Tap dance at the intermediate/advanced level. This course may be repeated one time for credit.
  
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    THEA 288 - Directing I: The Director’s Vision (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in THEA 130 ) History, theory, and principles of directing. Examines director’s role and responsibilities, play selection, conceptualizing, ground plans, blocking.
 

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