May 20, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Theater

  
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    THEA 295 - Musical Theatre Scene Study (3 credits)


    The study of performance and acting in the musical theatre. Several performance projects are required, all of which entail singing/acting and movement.
  
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    THEA 299 - Musical Theatre Scene Study Studio (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 150 , THEA 250 , and THEA 295 ) This course builds upon the work begun in THEA 295 Musical Theatre Scene Study that explores the various styles of acting represented in the musical theatre genre. Historic and stylistic significance will be prioritized as students rehearse and perform scenes and sections from the music theatre canon. This studio course focuses primarily on the ensemble element in new and/or established musical plays. S.
  
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    THEA 301 - Repertory for Musical Theatre I (1 credit)


    (Prereq: THEA 212 ) The student will explore and experience the nature of musical theatre and the unique performance demands required to create it at a proficient level. Emphasis will be placed on the initial study of the elements and techniques used to craft process for the musical theatre actor and selection of repertoire to best showcase individual vocal abilities. F, S.
  
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    THEA 302 - Repertory for Musical Theatre II (1 credit)


    (Prereq: THEA 301 ) The continued study of elements and techniques used to craft process for the musical theatre actor and the unique performance demands required to create it at a proficient level. The sustained study of the elements and techniques used to craft process for the musical theatre actor and selection of repertoire to best showcase individual vocal abilities. F, S.
  
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    THEA 321 Q* - Applied Theatre (3 credits)


    This class explores techniques, methodology and history of applied theatre focusing on social change, current events and/or social justice. Class includes experiential learning projects with targeted populations and/or non-profit organizations.
  
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    THEA 322 - Creative Dramatics (3 credits)


    The study and practice of theatre games and exercises as a means of learning to lead groups of all types and ages in an ensemble activity, including keeping a record of target group activities.
  
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    THEA 323 Q* - Topics in Applied Theatre (3 credits)


    This course focuses on the practical application of theatre studies in areas such as community engagement, outreach, and theatre for youth. Course topic(s) are announced and described prior to early registration each semester. Course may include community engagement projects. This course may be repeated up to nine credit hours under different topics. S.
  
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    THEA 329 - Stage Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 155  or permission of the instructor) Learn the basics of the art and science of stage management for live theatre. Topics will include script analysis, the audition process, the rehearsal process and strike. Differing styles of stage management as well as different theatrical genres will be presented, discussed, and analyzed.
  
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    THEA 331 - Introduction to Playwriting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 130  or permission of the instructor) Basic skills of playwriting including exercises in monologues, scenes, and conflict resolution, leading to completion of a one-act play. This course may be repeated once for credit. S.
  
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    THEA 333 - Introduction to Dramaturgy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 130 ) An exploration of the art, craft, and study of dramaturgy. The question ‘What is a dramaturg?’ will be answered. Who dramaturgs are, how dramaturgs work, and what dramaturgs do will be examined. Learning to think like a dramaturg means learning how to ask questions, when to ask questions - and learning what kind of questions to ask. In this course dramaturgical questions will be asked and answered. F.
  
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    THEA 342 Q - Voice and Speech (3 credits)


    (Prereq: B.F.A. Program only or by permission of the instructor; completion of THEA 242  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) The purpose of this class is to deepen the actor’s ability to express complex thought and true emotion through articulate speech. The class builds on work from Vocal Production for the Actor, solidifying the actor’s ability to perform challenging text. The study of phonetics is used to support these goals, and as the basis for future dialect study.
  
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    THEA 346 - Advanced Stagecraft (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 155 ) Advanced topics in live entertainment technology, including: advanced rigging techniques, show control, production planning, electronic controls, pneumatics, hydraulics, structural design for the stage, welding, and other state-of-the-art technologies. Student will focus on conversion of entertainment design to construction drawings and fabrication to installation. S, odd years.
  
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    THEA 347 - Principles of Sound Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq or Coreq: THEA 153 ) This course provides an in depth exploration to the theory and practice of theatrical acoustics, and fundamentals of design. Through class lectures, projects, and laboratory experience the student can expect an understanding of the equipment and techniques used in live entertainment sound design. By the end of the course, the student should have an advanced understanding of sound in relation to live entertainment design. F, even years.
  
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    THEA 348 - Digital Design for Live Entertainment


    (Prereq or Coreq: THEA 153 ) The course will focus on creating digital performance media through script, technology advancements, and production analysis. Students will gain practical application through digital rendering, video production and exploration of common software used in live entertainment. The class will explore both the creation of content and the complex presentation of content for live entertainment. S, even years.
  
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    THEA 350 - Acting III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 260 , B.F.A. program only, or by permission of the instructor) A studio course that expands upon the foundations learned in Acting I, Acting I: Studio and Acting II, Acting II: Studio. Actors are challenged to explore elements of character and style through the study of the Non-Realist genre. Students broaden their knowledge of acting as they approach material that makes increased demands on their physical, vocal, technical and imaginative resources. The techniques for character development, the pursuit of action and the understanding of text will be employed in the realm of a modernist approach to theatre. Topics may be drawn from contemporary, modern and avant-garde drama. F.
  
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    THEA 351 - Costume Construction (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 154 ) Uses of materials and techniques for stage costume including patterning, advanced constructions, crafts, and millinery.
  
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    THEA 352 - Costume Design (3 credits)


    Methods and principles of costume design with projects in both modern and period styles. Includes research methods, design conceptualizations, organization, communicating ideas through images, and play analysis for the costume designer.
  
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    THEA 355 - Scene Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 255 ) A studio course looking at design theory, history and contemporary design styles. Several projects will help to develop the drawing, drafting, rendering and model making skills of the student necessary to visually communicate design concepts to a director and other members of the production team.
  
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    THEA 356 - Lighting Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 255 ) Principles and theory of theatrical lighting design, including design process and execution, equipment and online request, script analysis and color theory.
  
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    THEA 357 - Scene Painting (3 credits)


    Studio projects designed to develop and practice basic skills needed in painting stage scenery. Fee.
  
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    THEA 358 - Properties Design and Construction (3 credits)


    Uses of materials and techniques for the beginning properties designer and builder, including sections on carpentry, plastics, soft goods and upholstery.
  
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    THEA 359 - Special Topics in Technical Theatre (3 credits)


    Rotating topics in technical theatre such as millinery, CAD drafting, computer-aided rendering, advanced patterning, etc.
  
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    THEA 361 - Theatre History and Literature I (3 credits)


    Traces major developments in theatre production and dramatic literature from their beginnings to the mid-17th century. Lecture, student presentation.
  
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    THEA 362 - Theatre History and Literature II (3 credits)


    Traces major developments in theatre production and dramatic literature from the mid-17th century to the 20th century.
  
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    THEA 363 - Musical Theatre History (3 credits)


    A survey of the playwrights, composers, directors, choreographers, performers, and productions of the American musical theatre from its European beginnings to the present; specific works are studied.
  
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    THEA 364 - Acting III Studio (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 350 , B.F.A. Program only, or by permission of the instructor) An advanced studio-based course in acting techniques and styles that explores alternatives to realism. Through extensive scene work, the course investigates the demands of specific playwrights’ works that create a non-realistic world view. S.
  
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    THEA 368 - Acting for the Camera (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 350  or THEA 295 ) This is a course that explores the fundamental techniques of working in front of the camera. Through practical application of acting exercises, individual work and scene work the student will learn techniques that will release them into performance. Instruction includes focus on technical language of film and television in addition to established acting techniques. Upon completion of the course, students receive a “reel” of the work accomplished during the semester. F.
  
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    THEA 372 - Movement for the Actor (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 150 ) The course will provide an introduction to current ideas in movement theory. Students will gain basic physical skills needed for acting: breath control, relaxation, flexibility and manipulation of the body at rest and in motion. In addition, this course will explore a method of training actors and their collaborators to develop a language of movement and sound based on the elements of time and space. F.
  
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    THEA 376 - Musical Theatre Dance Styles (2 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 274 , THEA 276 , and THEA 277  or permission of the instructor) The study and application of the choreographic styles of several leading Musical Theatre choreographers as well as student practice in choreography for the Musical Theatre. S.
  
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    THEA 377 - Dance Company (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 174 , THEA 175  or THEA 176 ) Practical studio work in dance technique and choreography with rehearsal in preparation for performance opportunities.
  
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    THEA 388 - Directing II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in THEA 288 ) This course will build on the fundamentals of Directing I and cover the director’s approach to text analysis and articulation of ideas as they relate to the process of staging a play. Directorial concepts, relationship of actor to director and staging and rehearsal techniques will be studied and implemented culminating in a final scene or one-act presentation. S.
  
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    THEA 395 - International Theatre Experience (3 credits)


    (Prereq: junior standing) A critical and historical survey of world theatre, culminating in a trip to a major world city. Focus will be on culture, performance and society. This course may be repeated once for credit if the destination changes.
  
  
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    THEA 401 - Repertory for Musical Theatre III (1 credit)


    (Prereq: THEA 302 ) The advanced study of elements and techniques used to craft process for the musical theatre actor and the unique performance demands required to create it at a proficient level. F, S.
  
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    THEA 425 - World Dramatic Literature (3 credits)


    (=ENGL 425 ) A critical and historical survey of the cardinal works of dramatic literature across the epochs of theatrical performance. The course accents analysis and interpretation.
  
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    THEA 429 - Theatre Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Problems involved in organizing, administering, and promoting the non-professional theatre.
  
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    THEA 442 - Actor’s Voice Lab (3 credits)


    (Prereq: B.F.A. Program only or by permission of instructor) The goal of this class is further development of the actor’s expressive voice. The purpose is to support the actor’s training in performing classical drama or other challenging texts, and to address individual vocal challenges. Learning is accomplished through class exercises, individual coaching, individual practice and performance. Class meets as a group, and in individually scheduled sessions.
  
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    THEA 445 - Physical Theatre Studio (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 245 ) This course is designed as a continuation of THEA 245 Physical Theatre and builds on the skills introduced and developed. The course is a studio course where students are presented with an opportunity to integrate elements of physicality into a variety of scripted and non-scripted performance situations. This work occurs through ongoing practice and pedagogy.
  
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    THEA 450 - Acting IV (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 364 , B.F.A. program only, or by permission of the instructor) The course explores the fundamental techniques of elevated text work. By studying the demands and conventions of classical plays, the actor will be challenged to apply learned techniques and, in addition, develop an approach to elevated text. Extensive text analysis, including examination of verse structure and scansion, will be used in combination with class exercises. Students will utilize the work from preceding acting courses and will understand its connection to classical performance. The work will culminate in monologue, sonnet, or scene work. F.
  
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    THEA 451 - Design Survey (3 credits)


    Students research various trends in the history and contemporary practice of theatrical design as well as critiquing a current professional production. Fee.
  
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    THEA 452 - Projects in Design (2 credits)


    Supervised design in one area for a main stage production. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
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    THEA 454 - Advanced Costume Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 352 ) The purpose of this course is to develop the artistic and practical aspects of designing costumes, building on previous training. The emphasis is placed on the design process and will include interpretation, character development, rendering techniques and design presentation. S, even years.
  
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    THEA 455 - Advanced Scene Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 355 ) The purpose of this course is to develop the artistic and practical aspects of designing scenery for theatre, building on previous training. The emphasis is placed on the design process and will include interpretation, rendering techniques, modeling, advanced drafting, digital modeling and design presentation. F, even years.
  
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    THEA 456 - Advanced Lighting Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 356 ) The purpose of this course is to develop the artistic and practical aspects of designing lighting for live entertainment, building on previous training. The emphasis is placed on the design process and will include interpretation, advanced drafting, color theory and presentation of design. The course will include advanced electrical application. F, odd years.
  
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    THEA 460 - Acting IV Studio (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 450 , B.F.A. program only, or by permission of the instructor) A studio based course that explores the physical and vocal demands of period acting. Study of classical poets/dramatists. Historical research expected along with text analyses, scoring of text and critical evaluation of a specific classical playwright’s work. This course combines extensive table work with exploration of applied acting techniques from the previous acting courses. In addition, an exploration of the physical and vocal demands of period acting as well as the historical context of each text are addressed. The work culminates in advanced monologue, sonnet or scene work. S.
  
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    THEA 462 - Dramatic Theory and Criticism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 160  and ENGL 425 ) An examination of the major theoretical treatises regarding theatre and performance arts from Aristotle to the present. F.
  
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    THEA 472 - Movement for the Actor II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 372 ) This course is a rigorous studio based course that explores, in depth, an established study of actor training that employs a physical approach to realizing theatrical work. This advanced course will build upon the precepts and exercises employed in Movement I and will culminate in a performance using the garnered techniques. S.
  
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    THEA 491 - Special Topics: New Works Development (3 credits)


    Topics in the areas of theatre that result in the creation of a new work in dramatic literature, performance, or design. Special Topics courses will be announced and described prior to early registration each semester.
  
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    THEA 495A - Theatre Internship (3-15 credits)


    (Prereq: at least 60 credit hours and permission of the instructor) Internship projects are defined as individualized professionally-oriented experiences undertaken with faculty supervision to supplement or complement the student’s academic programs. The guided internship requires 40 hours of on-site work per credit hour, a journal, a final paper and a final project or performance. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their field of study, and to enhance networking opportunities. S.
  
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    THEA 495B - Theatre Internship (15 credits)


    (Prereq: THEA 495A ) Continuation of internship from THEA 495A. S.
  
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    THEA 497 - Theatre Design and Production Capstone (1 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior standing) Each student plans and executes one significant project in the area of theatre design and technology which demonstrates significant proficiency in one or more theatrical elements. Supervised by a member of the theatre faculty, the project incorporates research, documentation, and a public exhibition. S.
  
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    THEA 498 - Musical Theatre Capstone (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Senior standing) In the final semester, each student plans and executes a project which demonstrates significant proficiency in singing, dancing, and acting. Supervised by a member of the Performing Arts Faculty, the project incorporates research, documentation, an audition portfolio, and a public performance.
  
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    THEA 499 - Theatre Capstone Project (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Senior standing) Each student plans and executes a project which demonstrates significant proficiency in one or more theatrical elements. Supervised by a member of the theatre faculty, the project will incorporate research, documentation, and a public exhibition.

University

  
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    UNIV 100 - Seminar in Leadership Development (2 credits)


    Leadership and organizational theories, leadership styles, decision-making techniques, service learning, team building and communication skills with an opportunity to apply learning during class discussions and activities. F.
  
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    UNIV 105 - Academic Improvement Hour (0 credits)


    This course is designed to provide students with the techniques to improve academic performance. Critical skills covered in this course include, but are not limited to, comprehension, reasoning, organization, planning, and effective communication. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 110 Q - First Year Experience (3 credits)


    Designed to enhance the satisfaction and success of first year students. The course focuses on developing critical and creative thinking, information literacy skills, improving written and oral communication skills, setting personal and academic goals, developing structured and consistent study habits, practicing effective time management, and becoming contributing members of the Coastal community. This course is a university graduation requirement and must be completed with a grade of ‘C’ or better. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 122 Q* - Introduction to Sustainability (3 credits)


    An introduction to the basic concepts and understanding of sustainability locally and globally. Topics will focus around the three pillars of sustainability; environment, economic and social, as well as topics such as waste reduction, consumer choices, energy, transportation, and natural resources. The field of sustainability continues to evolve, especially as awareness spreads about scarce resources on a crowded planet. Students will also explore sustainability through experiential learning activities and create a research-based presentation. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 129 - University Gospel Choir (1 credit)


    A course offering students an opportunity to learn gospel music and to sing at gospel gatherings across the state. Students should check with their major department regarding applicable degree credit. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 150 - Career Exploration (3 credits)


    This course is designed to provide the student with the skills necessary to make effective career decisions. A realistic assessment of self, identification of possible career fields and occupations, and methods of developing and implementing a plan of action will be emphasized. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 200 - Student Media Production (1 credit)


    Supervised participation in the production of student media, including the student newspaper, magazine, or literary journal. This course may be repeated for credit, but no more than eight total credits from University 200 may be applied toward a degree. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 202 - All Media Class (2 credits)


    (Prereq: New stipend student on staff of Student Media) A course exploring the production, printing and design of publications. The class focuses on the printing processes and the production of a camera ready or on line publication. Extensive use of the computer as a graphic design tool. Students will gain experience designing a newspaper, magazine, lit/art publication and Web page for their publication. S.
  
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    UNIV 205 - Student Services Leadership (3 credits)


    (Prereq: UNIV 100 ) The purpose of this course is to introduce the study of peer education, mentoring, and leadership, as it relates to student services, using text and outside readings, activities, and a variety of other assignments. This course will develop student services’ leaders on campus and improve overall peer leadership efficacy. It will give students a deeper understanding of themselves and appreciation for the diversity of others. It also serves as an opportunity to provide all student leaders with direct training and preparation for campus leadership and mentoring roles. S.
  
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    UNIV 300 - Principles of Peer Mentoring (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into Peer Mentor Program and permission of the instructor) This interactive course focuses on the study of issues, topics, and strategies related to mentoring first-year students at the University. Relevant student development theory is highlighted. This course prepares Peer Mentors to assist the instructor of FYE in a subsequent fall semester. S.
  
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    UNIV 301 - Applied Principles of Peer Mentoring (2 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of UNIV 300  and permission of the instructor) This course is designed to offer academic credit to Peer Mentors who spend eight to ten hours each week assisting the instructor in FYE, planning course content, meeting with first-year students and other course-related responsibilities determined by the Faculty Mentor or Peer Mentor Coordinator. This course specifically addresses topics and issues directly related to teaching and mentoring first year students in the success seminars. F.
  
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    UNIV 303 - Foundations of Peer Leadership in University Housing (0 to 3 credits)


    (Coreq: must be a first-semester resident adviser) This course focuses on developing leadership skills necessary to be a successful Resident Adviser. This course applies theories of development and engagement to working as a peer leader in University Housing. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 310 - Veterans Transition Seminar (3 credits)


    (Student must be a veteran) This course provides veterans with the necessary tools to make a successful transition from the armed forces to college and the transition to the civilian workforce after college. The culture of college life and the culture of the military are discussed and strategies for successful assimilation into the academic environment are presented. Members of the Veterans Success Team will assist with instruction. Classes on resume preparation, interviewing, professional dress, physical and mental health issues and career planning will be presented by the Team. F.
  
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    UNIV 315 - Service in Sustainability (3 credits)


    This course provides students with the opportunity to participate in an organized service activity that not only meets identified community needs, but also recognizes the field of sustainability. This course will integrate community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility and sustainable living and encourage lifelong civic engagement. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 320 - Writing Tutor Training (1 credit)


    (=ENGL 320 ) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) This course introduces students to both theoretical and practical concerns, issues, and questions central to the work of a writing center. As they investigate current trends in writing center scholarship, a variety of writing center models, and their own practices as tutors, students will question the practice of tutoring as they develop their own reflective stances. As it models effective center practices, this course will benefit current tutors, student hoping to tutor, students interested in education, or those considering graduate school. S.
  
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    UNIV 325 Q - Service Learning (0 to 3 credits)


    This course provides students an opportunity to participate in a supervised community service activity and reflect on how that activity has impacted their personal values and civic responsibility. In order to qualify for 3 credits, 60 hours of field activity are required. For all other cases, a minimum of 40 hours are required. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 333 - Interdisciplinary Nature of Careers (3 credits)


    (=IDS 333 ) IDS 333 /UNIV 333 will provide the student the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of operating in a consumer based economy. It will expose the student to a further understanding of the overall business environment and explore the student’s role as employee/ employer and consumer. The topics covered in the course will include a brief overview organizational, management and motivational theory, personal ethics as it applies to decision making, selecting a major and planning a career, managing change in organizations and on an individual level, innovation and creativity affecting all individuals in all organizations. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 395 Q - Internship Experience (0 credits)


    (Prereq: 2.5 minimum GPA) (Course Restrictions: Student must have completed a minimum of 30 credit hours before enrolling in course. This course cannot be used as an elective.) Requires a minimum of 150 hours of on-site supervised and evaluated student work experience. The purpose of this course is to provide a student the opportunity to confirm major selection, clarify career objective, expand networking contacts, and develop interpersonal and profession skills in a work environment. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the dean of University College) Written contract between student and instructor and approval by the dean of University College. Directed study and/or research on a specific topic. This course may be repeated once for credit. F, S.
  
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    UNIV 421 - Sustainable Development (3 credits)


    (=POLI 421 ) This class examines important questions surrounding the term “sustainable development” and its history through an analysis of the political economy, institutions, and cultural/social impacts of living in a sustainable manner and/or living unsustainably. S.
  
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    UNIV 495 Q - Internship (1 to 12 credits)


    (Course Restrictions: students must have permission of adviser, chair of major department, and dean of University College) (Prereq: students must have completed 60 credit hours before enrolling in the course) The purpose of this course is to provide a student with the opportunity to confirm major selection, clarify career objectives, expand networking contacts and develop interpersonal and professional skills in a work environment. The course may be repeated for up to 12 total credit hours. F, S, Su.

Visual and Performing Arts

  
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    VPA 103 - Inquiring Minds: Topics, Ideas, and Expression in the Fine Arts (3 credits)


    (=VPA 103H ) This course is designed to provide the student with the basic understanding of how the arts critically influence and culturally enhance our everyday experience. Each section will present a variety of modes that are rooted in artistic expression. Topics will draw from one or more of the following disciplines: Creative Writing, Music, Theatre, and the Visual Arts. F, S, M, Su.

Wall Fellows Program

  
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    WFP 301 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program I (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes seminars regarding professional conduct, project management, team leadership and personal development. Tailored experiences based on the majors of studies of the course participants. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team study, projects, internships and study trips. Students will develop skills to improve their workforce readiness. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) F.
  
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    WFP 302 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program II (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes the study of leadership and professional conduct in a variety of industries and organizations, national and international. Tailored experiences based on the participants’ majors of study. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team projects, internships and an international study trip. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) S.
  
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    WFP 401 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program III (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes seminars and projects that focus on developing professional conduct and networking, project management, leading organizations and personal effectiveness. Experiences are tailored based on the participants’ majors of study. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team projects, internships and study trips. Students will develop skills to improve their workforce readiness. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) F.
  
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    WFP 402 Q - Wall Fellows Leadership Program IV (0 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Walls Fellows Program) This course includes the study of leadership in a variety of industries and organizations (national and international), career planning, and professional development. Experiences are tailored based on the participants’ majors of study. Topics vary and are announced in advance. This course includes lecture seminars, team projects, internships and a domestic study trip. Students will develop skills to improve their workforce readiness. (This course is always taught as an honors course.) S.

Women’s and Gender Studies

  
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    WGST 103 Q* - Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies (3 credits)


    Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that covers a vast range of issues. This introductory course gives an overview of the women’s movement in the U.S. and discusses its legacy in U.S. society today. It explores gender and sexuality as social constructions; special attention is given to how women and men negotiate these categories of identity on a personal-political level by looking at contemporary media and cultural productions. Readings focus especially on how gender norms influence the distribution of power and the creation of oppression. Students use feminist theory as a tool to become aware of these issues, to discuss them effectively, and to promote justice and equality in the U.S. and globally. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 105 - Introduction to LGBTQ Studies (3 credits)


    In this course, students will become familiar with disciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the experiences and self-expressions of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    WGST 302 - Special Topics in Cultural Studies (1 to 3 credits)


    This course is an interdisciplinary examination of selected themes and topics relating to race, class, and gender that shed light on the ways in which cultural meaning is generated, disseminated, ad produced through various practices, beliefs and institutions. This course may be repeated one time (for a total of six credit hours) provided it on a different topic. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 305 Q* - Gender, Sexuality, Race, and Class in Popular Culture (3 credits)


    This class gives insight into the historical foundations, theoretical concepts, political manifestations, and social issues concerning feminist interpretations of popular culture. Students explore how popular culture generates and articulates understandings of gender and sexuality and their intersections with other identity markers such as race, class, and ability. Popular culture is never simply entertainment. It provides us with the stories, images, and scripts that enable us to imagine and practice femininities, masculinities, and sexualities. These, in turn, are imbued with class and racial values and characteristics. We absorb these norms in the ads we see, the movies/television we watch, and the music we listen to. The class focuses especially on how feminist concepts and theory provide the tools to become aware of issues of discrimination and oppression in pop culture, to discuss them effectively, and to promote social justice. F, S.
  
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    WGST 310 Q - Women and Allies in Action (3 credits)


    This course explores the great variety of ways in which people who are inspired by feminist ideas have worked for social justice. Students discuss what activism is, what makes activism feminist, and how we can make sure that our activism is intersectional and sustainable. Students study the history and strategies of anti-oppression activism and create and implement an activism project themselves – either benefiting the CCU campus or the wider Horry County community.
  
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    WGST 311 - Women and Work (3 credits)


    This course will explore how identity and difference (race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and age) impact women’s historical and contemporary work experiences from the family kitchen to the corporate boardroom. Students will critically engage with a broad range of topics, including workplace inequalities, the relationship between family and work, the politics of intimate labor, the globalizations of labor, and the history of labor movements. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 315 - Special Topics in Sexuality (3 credits)


    This interdisciplinary course examines sexuality at the intersection of race, gender, and class. Topics include the history of sexuality, representations of sexuality in popular culture, sex work, reproductive justice, and/or activism. This course may be repeated once with different course topics. F, S.
  
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    WGST 318 - Women and Social Movements (3 credits)


    This class is an exploration of women’s participation in a wide variety of transnational U.S. social justice movements from the 19th to the 21st century, such as the abolition of slavery, women’s suffrage, labor rights, civil rights, LGBTQ rights, and anti-globalization. Students will examine how the ideas and practices within these movements both reflected and shaped larger social meanings and uses of race, class, gender, and sexuality. F, S.
  
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    WGST 325 Q - Civic Engagement (3 credits)


    (Prereq: WGST 103  or permission of the instructor) This course provides an opportunity for students interested in Women’s and Gender Studies issues to put their ideas about social change into action. It is designed for students to apply models of social change to various 21st-century challenges, such as: gender and racial justice, oppression, population growth, community health needs, poverty, reproductive health and climate change. As a type of service learning course, civic engagement from a gender studies perspective involves working towards equality and addressing these and other social issues from many different angles. Students will volunteer with appropriate local organizations (such as the Horry County Rape Crisis Center, Citizens Against Spouse Abuse, and local homeless shelters, among others) to address gender-based issues of the student’s choice, and host an on-campus event to raise awareness of the issue. S.
  
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    WGST 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and Course Contract approved by the WGST Director) Reading or research on a specific topic related women and/or gender studies, under the direction of a faculty member. May involve a combination of reading assignments, tutorials, papers, presentations, etc. For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations  section in this catalog. F, S, Su.
  
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    WGST 402 - Gender and Sexuality in German and Austrian Culture (3 credits)


    (=LIS 402 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101 ) German and Austrian artists, intellectuals, and scientists have exercised enormous influence on attitudes about gender and sexuality over the course of the twentieth century and up to the present day. This class traces the development of discourses of gender and sexuality by analyzing works of fiction, non-fiction, and film in the cultural, social, and political context in which they were created. Topics to be addressed include psychoanalysis, sexology, homosexual emancipation, the women’s movement and feminism, the sexual politics of Nazi Germany, and contemporary debates surrounding multiculturalism. The course is taught in English and open to students without prior knowledge of German. To receive credit for the German minor or towards the major in Languages and Intercultural Studies, students must co-enroll in GERM 301L : German Culture Lab. F.
  
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    WGST 495 - Women’s and Gender Studies Internship (3 credits)


    The guided internship requires 120 to 140 hours of on-site work; a journal; and a final paper. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their knowledge and skills, to introduce them to local and regional employers in their field of study, and to enhance networking opportunities.
  
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    WGST 498 Q* - Capstone Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: nine hours of minor-designated courses including WGST 103 ) This class is the “capstone” to the Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) minor, an opportunity for years of coursework and skills to culminate in a substantial independent project. The bulk of the semester is spent developing, researching, and writing/executing an original paper or project that makes a singular contribution to the intellectual community of WGS. Projects are designed and crafted so that they can be used as writing samples, conference presentations, or article drafts to help students transition into the next stage as WGS scholars, activists, and professionals. This course is run workshop-style, which will ensure that students are continuously working on their projects and receive constructive feedback from the instructor and fellow classmates. F.
 

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