Nov 27, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

PGA Golf Management Program

  
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    PGA 202 - PGA/Golf Management Level 2, Seminar IV (2 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGA 201 ) The fourth in a series of seminars and classes supporting the required learning objectives of the PGA of America’s PGA Golf Management Program. Facility Management 2 expands on Business Planning, Merchandising, Customer Relations, and introduces Golf Operations. These discussions of principles will prepare students for the work experience activities required during Co-Op internships. S.
  
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    PGA 280 - Internship in Golf Management II (0 credits)


    (Prereq: PGA 180 ) Three month full-time co-op work experience meeting the eligible employment guidelines outlined in the PGA of America’s Constitution. Internship is continuation of PGA 180. Pass/Fail grading only. Su.
  
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    PGA 301 - PGA/Golf Management Level 2, Seminar V (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGA 202 ) The fifth in a series of seminars and classes supporting the required learning objectives of the PGA of America’s PGA Golf Management Program. Teaching and Player Development 2 expands instruction and coaching the game of golf and growth of comprehensive player development programs. These discussions of principles will prepare students for the work experience activities required during Co-Op internships. F.
  
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    PGA 302 - PGA/Golf Management Level 3, Seminar VI (2 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGA 301 ) The sixth in a series of seminars and classes supporting the required learning objectives of the PGA of America’s PGA Golf Management Program. Facility Management 3 focuses on the execution of the business plan in all areas of the operation and introduces Supervising and Delegating the facility staff. These discussions of principles will prepare students for the work experience activities required during Co-Op internships. S.
  
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    PGA 380 - Internship in Golf Management III (0 credits)


    (Prereq: PGA 280 ) Three month full-time Co-Op work experience meeting the eligible employment guidelines outlined in the PGA of America’s Constitution. Internship is continuation of PGA 280. Pass/Fail grading only. Su.
  
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    PGA 401 - PGA/Golf Management Level 3, Seminar VII (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGA 302 ) The seventh in a series of seminars and classes supporting the required learning objectives of the PGA of America’s PGA Golf Management Program. Teaching and Player Development 3 expand upon advance instruction and coaching methods and promoting your teaching business. These discussions of principles will prepare students for the work experience activities required during Co-Op internships. F.
  
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    PGA 480 - Internship in Golf Management IV (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: PGA 380 ) Seven month Co-Op internship that is conducted over an academic semester that is a continuation of PGA 380. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S, Su.
  
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    PGMP 101 - PGA/Golf Management Level 1, Seminar I (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program) This course introduces the concepts of golf management for the future member of the PGA of America. In-depth discussion of specific core information of the PGA of America’s PGA Golf Management Program and completion of related assignments will constitute the majority of this course structure.
  
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    PGMP 102 - PGA/Golf Management Level 1, Seminar II (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program) The second in a series of seminars and classes supporting the required learning objectives of the PGA of America’s PGA Golf Management Program. This seminar will include discussion on the objectives of the following areas: PGA Constitution, Golf Car Fleet Management, Rules of Golf, Tournament Operations, Golfer Development Programs, Golf Club Design and Repair, and introduction to Teaching. These discussion of principles will prepare students for the work experience activities required in PGMP 180 . For this preparation, completion of several components of the competency assignments involved in the PGA’s Level I education Program will be required for this class.
  
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    PGMP 171 - Introduction to Turf Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program) Designed to introduce principles of turfgrass management to the student interested in pursuing a career as a general manager or golf professional at a golf course. Topics include turfgrass selection, mowing, fertilization, irrigation, supplementary cultural practices, and management of turfgrass pests. (Course to be taken through Horry Georgetown Technical College.)
  
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    PGMP 180 - Internship in Golf Management I (0 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Professional Golf Management Program) Three month full-time co-op work experience meeting the eligible employment guidelines outlined in the PGA of America’s Constitution. Pass/Fail grading only.
  
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    PGMP 201 - PGA/Golf Management Level 1, Seminar III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGMP 102 ) This course continues the concepts of golf management developed in PGMP 101  and PGMP 102 . In-depth discussion of principles will be applied to assignments as the core of this course examines work experience activities from PGMP 180 . Completion of portions of the eight core competency assignments required for the PGA’s Level I Education Program will be a component of this course. Topics covered in this course will include: The PGA Constitution, the rules of golf, golf car fleet management, tournament operations, golfer development programs, golf club design and repair, introduction to teaching, and career enhancement.
  
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    PGMP 202 - PGA/Golf Management Level 1, Seminar IV (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGMP 201 ) This course explores the Pre-Seminar work required for completion of the PGA’s Level I Education Program. Concepts of material for business planning, customer relations, and analysis of the swing and the respective assignments required for completion of these portions of the Level I PGA Work Experience Kit will be the components of this course. Case studies will be used to connect theory with practical application.
  
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    PGMP 280 - Internship in Golf Management II (0 credits)


    (Prereq: PGMP 180 ) Three month full-time co-op work experience meeting the eligible employment guidelines outlined in the PGA of America’s Constitution. Internship is continuation of PGMP 180 . Pass/Fail grading only.
  
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    PGMP 282 - Survey of Food and Beverage Management (3 credits)


    (=HRTM 282 ) (Prereq: not recommended at the freshman level) Provides students with an opportunity to learn concepts and skills related to food and beverage service operations. Class time will be used to present concepts and base knowledge, while lab time will be used to develop actual food preparation skills and food and beverage costing techniques. F, S.
  
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    PGMP 301 - PGA/Golf Management Level 2, Seminar I (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGMP 202 ) This seminar will focus on the material contained in the PGA’s Level 2 educational program. Specific core competencies addressed include Business Planning and Operations, Customer Relations, Business communications, and Analysis of the Swing.
  
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    PGMP 302 - PGA/Golf Management Level 2, Seminar II (1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGMP 301 ) This seminar will focus on the material contained in the PGA’s Level 2 educational program. Specific core competencies addressed include Turf grass Management, Merchandise and Inventory Management, Supervising and Delegating. Philosophy and Swing Concepts, and Analysis of the Swing.
  
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    PGMP 380 - Internship in Golf Management III (0 credits)


    (Prereq: PGMP 280 ) Three month full-time co-op work experience meeting the eligible employment guidelines outlined in the PGA of America’s Constitution. Internship is continuation of PGMP 280 . Pass/Fail grading only.
  
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    PGMP 401 - PGA/Golf Management Level 3, Seminar I (2 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the PGA Golf Management Program and successful completion of PGMP 302 ) This course fulfills the learning objectives outlined in the PGA’s Level 3 curriculum. The course will primarily focus on Advanced Teaching, Player Development Programs & Teaching Business and Golf Club Fitting. F, S.
  
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    PGMP 402 - PGA/Golf Management Level 3, Seminar II (1 credit)


    (Restricted to PGA Golf students) (Prereq: PGMP 401 ) This course fulfills the learning objectives outlined in the PGA’s Level 3 curriculum. This course builds on Level 1 and Level 2 courses and emphasizes the integration of learning, teaching, and the performance elements of the game of golf. Topics include Career Enhancement, Supervising and Delegating, Human Resources, Food and Beverage Control, Advanced Teaching, and Player Development Programs. S.
  
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    PGMP 480 - Internship in Golf Management IV (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: PGMP 380 ) Seven month co-op internship that is conducted over an academic semester that is a continuation of PGMP 380 . Pass/Fail grading only.

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 100 - Introductory Philosophy Seminar (0 credits)


    This course will be an elective. This course is a general introduction to the study of philosophy. It introduces newly declared philosophy majors to the program, courses, and the faculty in the philosophy department at Coastal Carolina University.
  
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    PHIL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the most central problems of philosophy. Topics include logic, God, mind, justice, personal identity, freedom and determinism, knowledge, skepticism, morality and responsibility. The course provides an introduction to argumentation, critical thinking, conceptual analysis, and problem solving skills. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHIL 102 - Introduction to Ethics (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to the three main areas of philosophical ethics, metaethics, normative ethics and applied ethics. Students will explore metaethical issues such as ethical subjectivism and objectivism, moral skepticism, free will and responsibility, major normative theories such as consequentialism and deontology; and applied ethical issues such as animal rights, war, and cloning. The overarching goal will be for students to develop the skills necessary for thinking, writing, and speaking about ethical theories and problems while acquiring a basic understanding of these theories and problems.
  
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    PHIL 105 - Critical Thinking (3 credits)


    This is a course in basic reasoning skills, including identifying arguments and types of arguments, evaluating arguments, and defending one’s own views with reason and evidence. Students will build skills in basic empirical and statistical reasoning, avoiding common fallacies, and reasoning in specific contexts such as morality, religion, and politics. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to formal logic. Students will learn to recognize deductive and inductive arguments. They will translate English statements to the language of propositional deductive logic, construct truth tables, and use proof procedures such as natural deduction to demonstrate the validity of arguments. Common forms of inductive reasoning, such as analogical and probabilistic reasoning, may also be introduced. The formal reasoning skills acquired in this course may benefit students taking professional and graduate school admission tests. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHIL 214 - Philosophy of Sex and Love (3 credits)


    This course explores and critically examines various philosophical and scientific theories concerning the nature of love and sexuality which have been important in the Western world. Plato’s “Symposium,” Hegel’s “Phenomenology of Spirit,” and Freud’s “Three Essays on Sexuality” may be considered. Course topics will include philosophical and theological conceptions of sex and love, and ethical issues related to these topics, including monogamy, same-sex marriage, pornography, and adultery. S.
  
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    PHIL 220 - Science and Pseudoscience (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to critical reasoning skills useful in practical contexts involved with scientific and pseudoscientific claims. Cases analyzed may include typical examples of pseudoscience such as miracle cures, medical quackery, superstition, precognition, repressed memories, and conspiracy theories. The course may also examine popular representations and misrepresentations of science and its results. Critical thinking tools introduced may include techniques for evaluating inductive reasoning, identifying logical fallacies, evaluating statistical claims, and for recognizing and resisting perceptual and cognitive biases. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHIL 271 - Philosophical Writing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and a grade of ‘C’ or better in any other PHIL course, or permission of the instructor) A first course in philosophical methods, the aim of this course is to introduce students to the skills necessary to communicate in philosophy. The course will focus on techniques of active reading; summarizing arguments both in writing and orally; preparing abstracts, summaries, and responses to readings; writing argumentative and critical essays; presenting philosophical arguments, positions, problems and papers; thinking critically and creatively about philosophical problems, formulating original philosophical responses to problems, and using appropriate reference materials and methods. Classroom time will be organized around small and large group discussion, peer review sessions, and minimal lecture. The content employed to convey these essentials of philosophical discourse will vary by instructor.
  
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    PHIL 300 - Ancient Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is a survey of the history of ancient Greek philosophy from the Milesians through Aristotle. It traces the development of philosophical themes among the Pre-Socratics and proceeds to their development in the works of Plato and Aristotle. The emphasis throughout will be on understanding, analyzing, and evaluating the arguments of the philosophers.
  
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    PHIL 301 - Modern Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is a survey of Western philosophical thought from the early Renaissance through Hume. The chief emphasis is on the 17th and 18th Century, including Bacon, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley and Hume. This course may be taken prior to PHIL 300 .
  
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    PHIL 302 - 18th and 19th Century Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101 , one PHIL course at the 300 level, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) This course centers upon philosophical developments after the Enlightenment period. The critical philosophy of Immanuel Kant (especially his The Critique of Pure Reason), the dialectical thought of G.W.F. Hegel and his anti-systemic critics are the focus of the course.
  
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    PHIL 303 - Continental and American Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) The principal movements of philosophical thought from Colonial times to the present, with special emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries.
  
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    PHIL 305 - Contemporary Moral Issues (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This is a course in the application of ethical theory through the examination of moral issues confronting people in contemporary society. Topics vary but may include discussion of ethical problems related to abortion, drug use and laws, euthanasia, war and terrorism, homosexuality, violence, animal rights, the environment, and punishment.
  
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    PHIL 306 - 20th Century Analytic Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is a survey of the development of analytic philosophy in the Twentieth Century, with emphasis on both the works of prominent analytic philosophers and the methods now typical of contemporary analytic philosophy. The works of Frege, Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Quine, and Kripke may be considered. Topics may include the role of analysis and common sense in philosophy, theories of linguistic meaning, the relation language has with the world, the relationship between science and philosophy, and the nature of necessity and possibility.
  
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    PHIL 309 - Philosophy of Mind (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101  and Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction to the fundamental questions, concepts and problems of contemporary philosophy of mind, including those concerning the nature of mind, the relationship between mind and world, and understanding consciousness. Readings from Ryle, Armstrong, Lewis, Block, Churchland, Dennett, Jackson, Shoemaker, Tye, Dretske, et al.
  
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    PHIL 310 - Philosophical Themes in Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Selected philosophical problems as they are presented in imaginative and theoretical literature. Works of fiction and philosophical treatments of issues involved in them are read and discussed.
  
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    PHIL 311 - Ethical Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101  or PHIL 102 , and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) A study of moral principles and the basic concepts underlying these principles, such as good, evil, right, wrong, justice, value, duty, and obligation. Using original source readings from both classical and contemporary moral philosophy, this course develops an understanding of the philosophical foundations of various ethical theories. S.
  
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    PHIL 313 - Sports Ethics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is an attempt to clarify and explore general as well as specific ethical issues in sports. Topics the course investigates may include the moral significance of sport and concepts such as sportspersonship, as well as more specific issues such as the use of steroids, equal opportunity, payment for college athletes, and more. No background in ethics is required. The course may include a brief introduction to ethical reasoning and theory before exploring particular issues, applying ethical principles to real world situations in and involving sports. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHIL 314 - Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) An examination of modern political philosophers, their responses to political, social, economic and legal concepts, and issues concerning liberties and rights in the authority-individual relationship.
  
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    PHIL 315 - Technology and Human Values (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Three (3) credit hours in PHIL, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) Technology has come to play an increasingly dominant role in human life. This course analyzes modern technology from several perspectives, including: the ethical implications of employing information systems, the neutrality or non-neutrality of technology, the individual, social, and cultural impact of technology transfer, and the impact of technology upon the environment. The works of both critics and proponents of technology are explored.
  
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    PHIL 316 - Crime and Justice (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) The fundamental concepts of a criminal justice system, and their philosophical bases. Rights, privacy, responsibility, and the problem of justification of state control of private behavior through punishment and theory.
  
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    PHIL 317 - Bio-Medical Ethics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Ethical problems in medicine and biological research and the application of ethical principles to real-life situations involving patient autonomy, health care professionals, the beginning of life, the end of life, and human genetic experimentation.
  
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    PHIL 318 - Business Ethics (3 credits)


    (=PHIL 318H ) (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Ethical theory is presented and applied to business cases involving individual, corporate, and governmental rights and responsibilities. F, S, Su.
  
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    PHIL 319 - Environmental Ethics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Ethical problems concerning the environment and the application of ethical principles to real-life situations involving development vs. preservation, humans and nature, animals, bio-diversity, bio- and eco-centrism, deep ecology, and social and public policy.
  
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    PHIL 320 - Existentialism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) An introduction to existential themes in contemporary philosophy, literature, psychology and religion. The writings of existentialists such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Camus, Sartre, Buber, May, and Binswanger will be read and discussed.
  
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    PHIL 321 - Symbolic Logic (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 110  and Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course explains the development, application, and theoretical properties of an artificial symbolic language designed to provide a clear representation of the logical structure of deductive arguments. The course might also explore first- order calculus with identity and function symbols and some metatheorems about consistency, soundness, completeness and compactness.
  
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    PHIL 322 Q* - Philosophical Issues in Feminism (3 credits)


    (Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course explores and critically examines philosophical topics in feminist thought, with a particular emphasis on one or more of the following: feminist ethics, feminist epistemology, feminist political philosophy, and feminist philosophy of science. Issues may include the nature of feminist theorizing and varieties of feminist theories; feminist perspectives on the self and the social world; moral agency, knowledge, and reason, the family, motherhood, and sexuality; liberty, justice, and the state.
  
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    PHIL 323 - Philosophy of Law (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction to philosophical problems in the law. Topics may include the nature of law (including legal positivism, natural law theory, and legal realism), the relationship between law and morality, the aims and limits of law, judicial reasoning, and issues in constitutional law, criminal law, and tort law. Readings include Supreme Court cases, as well as a variety of classical and contemporary texts.
  
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    PHIL 325 - Philosophy of Religion (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course focuses on some central questions in philosophy of religion. Is religious faith rational? Can God’s existence be proven? Can religious experience provide knowledge? Is there life after death? This course subjects the claims of religious faith to rational scrutiny and critical evaluation.
  
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    PHIL 333 Q* - Doing Philosophy with Children (3 credits)


    (Prereq: any PHIL course (except PHIL 110 ) and Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) An exploration of methods for introducing philosophy to K-12 students and creating a “Community of Inquiry.” This course will focus on the theoretical background related to philosophy for children, the practical issues related to engaging children in philosophical discussion using children’s literature, and the experience of facilitating philosophical discussions with area school children in after-school programs. S.
  
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    PHIL 340 - Philosophy of Science (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101  and Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) A critical examination of methods and concepts of the sciences. Topics include scientific revolutions, the unity of science, experimentation, explanation, and evidence.
  
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    PHIL 360 - Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course addresses questions concerning the nature of art, aesthetic value, aesthetic experience, and the ontology of art, along with aesthetic questions specific to art forms such as music, theatre, painting, architecture, and poetry. Topics may also include the aesthetics of the natural world and of everyday objects.
  
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    PHIL 370 - Medieval Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101  and Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is a survey of Western philosophical thought during the Middle Ages, roughly from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance. Topics may include the question of the nature and existence of God, whether humans are free, the nature of time and whether the world is eternal, identity and difference, necessity and possibility, medieval logic, and skepticism about philosophical and scientific knowledge. Significant figures discussed may include Augustine, Boethius, Avicenna, Abelard, Anselm, Averroes, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and Ockham, as well as the classical background from Aristotle and Plato. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHIL 390 - Topics in Applied Ethics (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This variable-unit course explores specific current issues in a philosophically and ethically rigorous way. After a possible introduction to ethical principles and theories, students will apply said theoretical information to particular subject areas (which will identify the topic explored). Possible topics include: intellectual property rights, ethics of war, race and racism, gender and sexism, media ethics, and more. F, S.
  
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    PHIL 398 - Special Topics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) This course is designed as a seminar that will focus on a broad ranging philosophical topic that involves other disciplines as well as philosophy.
  
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    PHIL 399 - Independent Study (1-3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations section in this catalog. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    PHIL 399H - Interdisciplinary Independent Study (3 to 9 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Directed independent study at the honors level in two or more departments. For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations section in this catalog. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    PHIL 419 - Epistemology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101 , one PHIL course at the 300 level, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction to the problems and methods of modern epistemology. It explores central questions such as “What is it to know something?” and “What is it about some beliefs that make them more highly justified than others?” The central focus of the course is the study of the relationship between justification and knowledge. It pays careful attention to the skeptic who claims that no one ever knows anything and that no one is ever justified in believing anything.
  
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    PHIL 420 - Metaphysics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHIL 101 , one PHIL course at the 300 level, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) This course focuses on issues that center around such notions as substance, causality, essential properties, individuation, time, possible but nonactual states of affairs, and identity. Among the questions considered are: “Do any of the things there are endure through time?” “How should we understand possible but nonactual states of affairs?” “Are subjects of consciousness just complexes of subatomic particles?” “Are material objects like tables and chairs ultimately made up of things that have no parts?”
  
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    PHIL 490 - Capstone Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior standing) This seminar engages philosophy majors in research and discussion involving an advanced topic in philosophy. The final paper will be a work demonstrating both research skills and original argument, and will be suitable for submission to an undergraduate conference or journal. Students will present their final papers to the philosophy faculty at the completion of the course. F.
  
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    PHIL 495 - Internship for Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Students will receive instruction and gain professional experience in an internship while working 10 hours per week for 12 weeks with a local business. Course contract must be approved prior to registration.
  
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    PHIL 498 - Advanced Research in Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: 3.0 GPA, PHIL 271 , at least two courses in philosophy at the 300 level or above, and Sophomore standing or higher; or permission of the instructor) Students will explore philosophical writing relating to an intended thesis topic, in an area of philosophy that they have previously studied. They will acquire knowledge of research methods in philosophy, synthesize readings in identifying a thesis topic, and prepare a thesis prospectus. Students will present their thesis prospectus to a committee of no less than three members of the philosophy faculty and one outside reviewer. Offered as needed.
  
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    PHIL 499 - Senior Thesis in Philosophy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Senior standing) Students will plan, execute, and write an original philosophy paper under the direction of a thesis adviser in philosophy. The thesis will reflect a mastery of philosophical writing skills, research skills, and content knowledge, and will be suitable for submission to an undergraduate conference or journal. The student will present the thesis to the philosophy faculty at the completion of the course. F, S.

Physical Education

  
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    PHED 360 - Motor Behavior (4 credits)


    (=EXSS 360 ) (Prereq: EXSS 205  or EDPE 131 ) A study of the development (maturation and growth), acquisition, retention, and transfer of motor skills and behavior throughout the lifespan. Emphasis given to the underlying processes in the control, learning, and performance of motor skills. As a foundation course for motor skill practitioners working with a variety of ages and populations, the content blends principles of motor learning/control, motor development, and sport psychology.
  
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    PHED 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    F, S.

Physically Active Living Skills

  
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    PALS 102 - Fitness Walking (1 credit)


    Introduction to low-impact, cardiovascular endurance activity of walking. Proper techniques of walking, warm-up, and cool down are practiced. Topics include benefits, injury prevention, weight management, and goal setting relative to a personal fitness program.
  
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    PALS 103 - Tai Chi (1 credit)


    Provides a fundamental understanding and practice of the Tai Chi philosophy, principles, applications and benefits. Emphasis on basic practices of Chi-Gung.
  
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    PALS 104 - Group Fitness (1 credit)


    Provides a variety of exercise class formats to improve cardiovascular fitness. Formats include, but not limited to kickboxing, step aerobics, water exercise, yoga, circuit training, interval training, and hi-lo aerobics.
  
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    PALS 105 - Yoga (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basic physical and mental skills of yoga. Development of improved levels of somatic awareness, joint flexibility, muscle function, energy, stress management, mental focus, and injury prevention.
  
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    PALS 106 - Step Aerobics (1 credit)


    Introduction of the step form of aerobics as a cardiovascular workout. Basic step patters, routines, progression, and choreography are practiced. Topics also include basic exercise science and nutrition.
  
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    PALS 107 - Pilates (1 credit)


    Emphasis on the development of strength, flexibility and endurance. Body awareness skills include core stability and balance in areas such as pelvis, back, and shoulder girdle, neutral alignment, and patterned breathing.
  
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    PALS 108 - Fitness Kickboxing (1 credit)


    Introduction to kickboxing for cardiovascular and muscular fitness. Emphasis on basic kicking and boxing patterns, techniques, safe kicks, punches, and combinations. Topics also include concepts of improved aerobic endurance, muscular flexibility, balance, strength and tone, and nutrition.
  
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    PALS 109 - Aquatic Fitness (1 credit)


    Provides a safe and effective form of non- or low-impact progressive resistance exercise to develop muscular strength and endurance, improve cardiovascular fitness and increase flexibility. No swimming skills are needed for this aquatic class.
  
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    PALS 110 - Indoor Cycling (1 credit)


    Stationary cycling methods emphasizing aerobic and anaerobic endurance at all fitness levels. Topics include exercise science concepts, fitness principles and technology.
  
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    PALS 111 - Jogging (1 credit)


    Overview of the preparation, training principles, and suggested programs for jogging as exercise. Emphasis given to progression of fitness, techniques, fitness principles, safety and injury prevention, and personalizing program.
  
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    PALS 112 - Personal Fitness Assessment (1 credit)


    Provides assessment and prescription of the components of personal fitness. Emphasis on using current technology and assessment techniques to plan and monitor fitness activities to meet personal goals.
  
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    PALS 113 - Triathlon Training (1 credit)


    Provides training concepts and practice in the three elements of a triathlon: swimming, biking, and running. Students must know how to swim and provide their own bicycle and helmet. Some training activities may be held off campus.
  
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    PALS 114 - Fitness Swimming (1 credit)


    Emphasis on the refinement of swim strokes, wall turns, endurance swimming, and swimming for cardiovascular and muscular fitness. Students must first demonstrate competence in the four basic swimming strokes.
  
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    PALS 116 - High Intensity Training (1 credit)


    Introduction to high intensity training to improve muscle strength and function. Emphasis placed on orientation to facilities and equipment, planning an effective program, fundamental principles and techniques of safe and effective muscular and cardiovascular conditioning. F, S.
  
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    PALS 117 - Beginning Strength Training and Conditioning (1 credit)


    Introduction to resistance training to improve muscle strength and function. Emphasis placed on orientation to facilities and equipment, planning an effective program, fundamental principles and techniques of safe and effective muscular conditioning.
  
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    PALS 118 - Intermediate Strength Training and Conditioning (1 credit)


    Intermediate/ advanced skills associated with strength training for fitness and muscle function. Strength training experience is expected, and topics include concepts such as muscle physiology, advanced training programs, and individualized goal setting.
  
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    PALS 119 - Personal Fitness Vehicles (1 credit)


    Introduction to the skills and knowledge necessary to safely and effectively ride human powered vehicles (such as a Trikke carving vehicle) for improved fitness and recreation.
  
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    PALS 120 - Personal Fitness and Technology (1 credit)


    Exploring, implementing, and evaluating current technologies as a tool for understanding, developing, and maintaining personal fitness and a healthy lifestyle. Students participate in a variety of health-enhancing physical activities across all components of personal fitness and wellness.
  
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    PALS 124 - Army Physical Fitness (1 credit)


    Introduction to the components of fitness. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of training principles and physical conditioning and the improvement of personal fitness levels. Course includes exercise testing, exercise leadership and team competitions. F, S.
  
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    PALS 125 - Beginning Golf (1 credit)


    Fundamentals of golf for the beginning participant. Emphasis placed on essential techniques, concepts, rules and etiquette for successful participation. Course meets at Coastal’s Quail Creek Golf Course.
  
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    PALS 126 - Intermediate Golf (1 credit)


    Fundamentals of golf for the experienced participant. Emphasis placed on practice and mastery of golf shots, strategy, rules and etiquette.
  
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    PALS 127 - Beginning Tennis (1 credit)


    Fundamentals of tennis for the beginning participant. Emphasis on basic tennis skills and techniques, rules, scoring and etiquette to participate successfully.
  
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    PALS 128 - Intermediate Tennis (1 credit)


    For the experienced participant, emphasis on mastery of strokes and shots, advanced strategies, match play and etiquette.
  
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    PALS 129 - Indoor Racquet Sports (1 credit)


    Introduction to the fundamentals of indoor racquet sports including but not limited to: racquetball, pickleball, and badminton. Emphasis on basic skills, scoring, rules, etiquette and strategy.
  
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    PALS 130 - Lacrosse (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basic skills and techniques for successful participation in the sport of lacrosse. Emphasis on skill progressions, rules, strategies and game play.
  
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    PALS 132 - Advanced Yoga (1 credit)


    (Prereq: PALS 105 ) Designed for students who want to further the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of their practice of yoga to improve physical wellness, reduce stress and increase mental focus/clarity. This course builds upon the techniques and concepts learned in PALS 105 Yoga. This course may be repeated two times for credit. F, S.
  
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    PALS 133 - Beginning Bowling (1 credit)


    For beginning participants, topics include basic technique, grip, approaches, releases, spot bowling techniques, rules, equipment, scoring and safety procedures. Course meets off campus.
  
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    PALS 134 - Intermediate Bowling (1 credit)


    Emphasis on skill development for students with prior bowling knowledge and experience. Topics include strategy, accuracy, and scientific concepts. Course meets off campus.
  
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    PALS 135 - Flag Football (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basic skills, safety, history, rules and game strategies/variations, and fitness principles to participate successfully in flag football (co-ed).
  
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    PALS 136 - Soccer (1 credit)


    Designed to teach fundamental skills for game performance, history, rules and game strategy.
  
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    PALS 137 - Basketball (1 credit)


    Study designed to introduce beginning and intermediate level skills instruction and strategies leading to active participation in game situations.
  
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    PALS 138 - Volleyball (1 credit)


    Study designed to introduce beginning and intermediate level skills instruction and strategies leading to active participation in game situations.
  
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    PALS 139 - Softball (1 credit)


    Designed to teach fundamental skills for game performance, history, rules and game strategy.
  
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    PALS 140 - Fencing (1 credit)


    Introduction to the basics of the sport of fencing. Emphasis on safety, equipment, techniques, strategic concepts, scoring and rules, physical and mental preparation, and a progression toward competition.
 

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