Oct 21, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Education - Physical Education

  
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    EDPE 232 - History and Philosophy of Physical Education (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDPE 131  or permission of department chair) Students will be provided with insight into the historical and philosophical basis of physical education and sport. This course covers physical education and sport from the ancient world, through the medieval and early modern Europe, the development of American physical education and sport to today’s practices. Other topics addressed will be ethics, integrity, and problems in the profession, ancient and modern Olympics, international participation, current issues, technological advances, and future directions in the profession. F, S.
  
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    EDPE 290 - Adapted Physical Activity (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDPE 131  or permission of department chair) Methods of working with students with special needs within regular physical education classes. Planning, organizing, and implementing adapted physical education learning experiences to meet the needs of special populations. The course has a lab experience. F, S.
  
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    EDPE 303 - Teaching Lifetime Fitness (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) (Coreq: EDPE 410 ) Course provides the teacher candidate with current best practice in teaching personal fitness to students in K-12 schools. Course requires the development of personal fitness skills and pedagogical skills including peer teaching, lesson and unit planning, and the use of assessment and technology. F.
  
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    EDPE 304 - Teaching Team Sports (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) (Coreq: EDPE 411 ) Course provides the teacher candidate with current best practice in teaching team sports to students in K-12 schools. Course requires the development of personal competence in select team sports/skills and pedagogical skills including peer teaching, lesson and unit planning, skill analysis, and the use of assessment and technology. S.
  
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    EDPE 305 - Teaching Lifetime Activities (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) (Coreq: EDPE 412 ) Course provides the teacher candidate with current best practice in teaching lifetime physical activities to students in K-12 schools. Course requires the development of personal competence in select team lifetime activities and pedagogical skills including peer teaching, lesson and unit planning, skill analysis, and the use of assessment and technology. F.
  
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    EDPE 320 - Curriculum and Administration in Physical Education (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) (Coreq: EDPE 305  and EDPE 412 ) Course provides the teacher candidate with an introduction to K-12 physical education curriculum models, standards-based curriculum development, and a variety of administrative issues essential for a beginning teacher. Course includes the impact of current local, state, and national issues and legislation important to developing, delivering, and assessing the physical education curriculum. F.
  
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    EDPE 325 - Assessment and Technology in Physical Education (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDPE 131  and EDUC 204 ) (Coreq: EDPE 303  and EDPE 410 ) To provide the skills and knowledge for students in physical education utilizing a variety of current technologies and authentic assessment tools available and emerging in the field. To develop a working knowledge of the statistical techniques used in scoring, assessment, and interpretation of student performance and learning. F.
  
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    EDPE 410 Q* - Elementary School Physical Education Pedagogy (4 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) (Coreq: EDPE 303  and EDPE 325 ) Foundations and practices in teaching elementary school physical education. Course studies the development and assessment of fundamental movement patterns/skills, curriculum development, and planning and implementing instruction at the elementary level. The teacher candidate also develops pedagogical skills through self-assessments and the required 30 hour field experience in the elementary schools. F.
  
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    EDPE 411 - Middle School Physical Education Pedagogy (4 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education and EDPE 410 ) (Coreq: EDPE 304 ) Foundations and practices in teaching middle school physical education. Course studies the development and assessment of motor and fitness skills for early adolescent students, curriculum development, and planning and implementing instruction at the middle school level. The teacher candidate also develops pedagogical skills through self-assessments and the required 30 hour field experience in the middle schools. S.
  
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    EDPE 412 - High School Physical Education Pedagogy (4 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education and EDPE 411 ) (Coreq: EDPE 305  and EDPE 320 ) Foundations and practices in teaching high school physical education. Course studies the development and assessment of motor and fitness skills for late adolescent students, curriculum development, and planning and implementing instruction at the high school level. The teacher candidate also develops pedagogical skills through self-assessments and the required 30 hour field experience in the high schools. F.
  
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    EDPE 431 - Internship Seminar in Physical Education Teacher Education (1 credit)


    Course provides Teacher Candidate with focused content related to the successful completion of internship process and requirements. F, S.
  
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    EDPE 479 Q - Internship (Physical Education) (9 credits)


    (Coreq: EDPE 496 ) The physical education internship is comprised of supervised teaching experiences at either the elementary, middle or high school grade level. Internship requires candidates to assume the responsibilities of a Physical Education Teacher for a period of no fewer than 60 instructional days. Pass/Fail grading only. F, S.
  
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    EDPE 496 - Internship Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Acceptance into the Internship through Portal II) (Coreq: EDPE 479 ) The Physical Education Internship Seminar provides candidates with the content and support required for successful completion of the internship and induction into the profession. Seminar topics include but are not limited to: student motivation/behavior; teachers’ legal obligations/concerns; program advocacy; grant writing; technology usage; resumes/cover letters; and interview skills. F, S.

Education - Secondary

  
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    EDSC 410 - Secondary Adolescent Development and Management in the Classroom (3 credits)


    This course addresses the management of the classroom environment and learning processes as applied to secondary adolescent development. Attention is given to theories and best practices and includes a clinical experience. S.
  
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    EDSC 415 - Teaching Diverse Learners (3 credits)


    Study of classrooms today as diverse learning environments. Needs and effective teaching strategies as related to diverse learners are explored. Special attention is given to the interdependence of schooling and culture. S.

Education - Special Education

  
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    EDSP 200 Q* - Foundations of Special Education (3 credits)


    (=EDSP 201 ) (Prereq: EDUC 111 ) This course provides knowledge of basic concepts in special education related to the education of individuals with disabilities. Content includes historical factors, legislation, etiology, characteristics, educational strategies (including existing and emerging technologies), identification procedures, support services for individuals with disabilities at varied degrees of severity, and the impact of disabilities on academic and social/emotional performances. S, Su.
  
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    EDSP 201 Q - Foundations of Special Education: A Global Perspective (3 credits)


    (=EDSP 200 ) (Prereq: EDUC 111 ) This course provides knowledge of basic concepts in special education related to the education of individuals with disabilities. Content includes historical factors, legislation, etiology, characteristics, educational strategies (including existing and emerging technologies), identification procedures, support services for individuals with disabilities at varied degrees of severity, and the impact of disabilities on academic and social/emotional performances. Consent of the instructor is required. M.
  
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    EDSP 310 - Theory to Practice: Field Experience (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDSP 200 ) This course is a supervised field experience requiring two full school days per week with students with mild to moderate disabilities at the elementary level. Related seminar addresses the roles of special educators, organizational and legal contexts for special education programs, models of service delivery, professional and ethical practice, collaboration skills, and research/evidence-based practices. The link between theory and practice is emphasized. F.
  
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    EDSP 311 - Characteristics and Instruction of Learning Disabilities & Emotional Disorders (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course provides an in-depth study of definitions, etiology, prevalence, and characteristics associated with learning disabilities (LD) and emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). Techniques used in identifying and teaching learners with LD or EBD, as well as service delivery models, roles of various professionals, legal issues, ethics, and philosophies related to persons with LD or EBD. The selection and implementation of evidence-based instructional methods related to affective and learning behaviors and procedures for adapting materials to support students with LD and EBD in a variety of educational settings are addressed. F.
  
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    EDSP 312 - Characteristics and Instruction of Intellectual Disabilities and Autism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course introduces teacher candidates to students with a label of intellectual disability (ID) and/or autism. The course includes definitions, etiology, prevalence, and characteristics of individuals with ID and/or autism. Additionally, candidates in this course investigate service delivery, roles of various professionals, current trends, and philosophies related to persons with ID and/or autism. Learning characteristics, evidence-based teaching strategies, instructional settings, legal issues, ethics, and assessment regarding individuals with ID and/or autism are addressed. F.
  
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    EDSP 320 - Measuring Student Progress: Field Experience (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDSP 310 ) This course is a supervised field experience requiring two full school days per week with students with mild to moderate disabilities at the middle level. An in-depth study of single-subject research methods including data collection, research designs, data display and analysis, and developing research proposals using single-subject methodology is addressed. Knowledge and skills developed in the prior field experience and current coursework are reinforced. S.
  
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    EDSP 321 - Diagnostic Assessment in Special Education (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course provides an overview of assessment terminology, data collection procedures, and the theoretical, legal, and ethical issues related to referral and educational planning. Skills focus on application and interpretation of standardized and curriculum-based assessment data for eligibility, program and progress monitoring decisions in service of individualized education programs. Candidates write individual education programs, develop strategies to modify assessments to accommodate the unique needs of students with disabilities, and communicate assessment information to solicit parent understanding. S.
  
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    EDSP 322 - Secondary Practices and Transition (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course applies research on teacher effectiveness, teacher accountability, and instructional approaches at the secondary level. Strategies in self-regulation, study skills, attention, memory, and motivation; curriculum adaptations, peer mediated instruction including cooperative learning and peer tutoring; and self-advocacy and strategies for facilitating transition into the community, workplace, and postsecondary environments are addressed. F.
  
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    EDSP 323 - Methods and Adaptations for Teaching Reading (K-12) (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course prepares candidates in the area of reading development and effective instructional methodologies specific to students with disabilities with an emphasis on reading practices as they relate to individual learners, readiness activities, phonemic awareness and decoding skills, phonics, fluency, vocabulary development, and comprehension. S.
  
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    EDSP 380 Q* - Current Trends in the Education of Individuals with Exceptionalities PreK-12 (3 credits)


    This course is a study of individuals with exceptionalities including learners with mild to severe disabilities, as well as those identified as gifted/talented. Current trends, legal issues, adaptations, and vocational aspects of learners with exceptionalities across the lifespan are addressed. F, S, Su.
  
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    EDSP 410 - Action Research: Practicum (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDSP 320 ) This course is a supervised practicum that extends to internship. This practicum requires three full school days per week with students with mild to moderate disabilities. Candidates are given the opportunity to analyze pedagogical competencies and to build personal strategies for teaching. Knowledge and skills developed in the prior field experience and current coursework are reinforced. The research proposal developed in the prior field experience is used to implement an intervention with a student in a classroom. Candidates continue in this placement for their internship. S.
  
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    EDSP 411 - Collaboration and Consultation in Special Education (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course prepares candidates to serve the needs of individuals with disabilities through effective communication and collaboration with other educators, families, related service providers, paraprofessionals, and personnel from community agencies. Models and strategies for effective collaborative consultation in schools and communities are addressed, including skills for effective communication with families of individuals with exceptional learning needs from diverse backgrounds. F.
  
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    EDSP 412 - Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course equips candidates with the knowledge and skills of applied behavior analysis (ABA) as an approach for programming effective interventions for children and youths with disabilities. It focuses specifically on “positive behavior interventions and supports” (PBIS), a research-based approach to interventions designed to prevent problem behavior, encourage environmental management, and promote students’ positive and appropriate behavior. This course also prepares candidates to conduct a functional behavioral assessment (FBA) in order to more efficiently and effectively identify the interventions to address the students’ behavioral needs. F.
  
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    EDSP 414 - Instructional Planning (3 credits)


    (Restricted to Special Education majors only) (Prereq: Admission to the Professional Program in Teacher Education) This course focuses on acquiring the basic knowledge and skills required for the development of IEPs and ongoing monitoring of students’ progress toward their IEP goals and objectives/ benchmarks. In addition, subsequent development of instructional lessons based on the student’s learning needs as they relate to their academic/social/behavioral success within the general education curriculum are addressed. F.
  
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    EDSP 420 - Internship Seminar in Special Education (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDSP 410 ) (Coreq: EDSP 450 ) This seminar corresponds with the culminating internship in special education. The course meets regularly in order to provide candidates with the content and support required for successful completion of the internship and induction into the profession. S.
  
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    EDSP 450 - Internship in Special Education (9 credits)


    (Prereq: EDSP 410 ) (Coreq: EDSP 420 ) This internship is a full-time supervised field placement. Candidates are assigned to two (2) eight week clinical placements requiring no fewer than 60 instructional days at the elementary, middle and/or secondary levels working with students with learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, and/or mild intellectual disabilities. A critical component of the internship course is the corresponding internship seminar. S.
  
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    EDSP 499 - Practicum in Severe Disabilities (1 credit)


    (Prereq: EDSP 200 ) This course is a supervised field experience requiring ten full school days in a public school classroom that serves students with significant intellectual and multiple disabilities. In this field experience, teacher candidates pursuing the add-on license in severe disabilities will make programmatic decisions and design instructional plans for students with significant intellectual and multiple disabilities under the supervision of a licensed special education teacher. Further, teacher candidates pursuing the add-on license in severe disabilities will implement evidence-based practices and deliver instructional content that meets individual needs and grade-level academic standards for students with significant intellectual and multiple disabilities. S.

Engineering

  
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    ENGR 101 - Introduction to Engineering (3 credits)


    Students are introduced to the engineering profession and various engineering specialists. The course teaches students about engineering teamwork and general design concepts through mini-design projects, and enhances students’ communication skills (through several written and oral reports) that are crucial in engineering. Professional ethics are emphasized. Communication Intensive. S.
  
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    ENGR 201 - Engineering Problem Solving (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGR 101 ) In this course, students work in multi-disciplinary teams to formulate and solve engineering problems using robotics systems and MATLAB. The course covers reading, interpreting, and writing programs, debugging, loops, and conditional statements. Project management principles are also introduced as the framework in which group members cooperate. The course culminates in a design challenge that requires teams to devise a system, component, or process to meet desired needs with given constraints. S.
  
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    ENGR 202 - Engineering Graphics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGR 101 ) This course is a project-based introduction to engineering graphics using SolidWorks. Topics include sketching, 3D part and assembly creation, and documented drawings. Students will utilize the principles of engineering graphics to visualize, communicate, and analyze solutions to engineering problems. S.
  
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    ENGR 234 - Statics (3 credits)


    (=PHYS 234 ) (Prereq: PHYS 211 ) This course deals with systems of forces acting on particles and rigid bodies at rest. The course addresses the finding of resultant forces and torques for various bodies. The covered topics include concentrated and distributed forces, equilibrium in two-and three-dimensions, moments, couples, and other key principals used in engineering design of structures that must remain static while bearing stress or performing a task. F.
  
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    ENGR 235 - Electric Circuits (3 credits)


    (=PHYS 235 ) (Prereq: PHYS 137  and MATH 160 , or PHYS 212 ) This course is an introduction to electrical circuit theory and its application to practical direct and alternating current circuits. Topics include: Kirchhoff’s laws, fundamental principles of network theorems, transient and steady-state response of RC, RL and RLC circuits by classical methods, time-domain and frequency-domain relationships, phasor analysis and power. F.
  
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    ENGR 315 - Electric Power and Renewable Energy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PHYS 212  or PHYS 214 ; or permission of the instructor) This course focuses on the role of renewable power generation in today’s electricity power grid. This course has three main sections. The first section introduces the topology and operation of the current power grid. The second section is an in-depth analysis of wind, solar, and hydro, the three major renewable sources in use today, from an electrical engineering perspective. Finally, we conclude with the future of renewable energy: experimental technologies and the challenges of operating the power grid in the 21st century. F.
  
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    ENGR 321 - Electronics (3 credits)


    (=PHYS 321 ) (Prereq: ENGR 235  or PHYS 235 ) This course covers the analysis, modeling and design of electrical circuits that contain electronic devices. Topics include: properties of electronic materials, behavior of devices such as p-n junction diodes, field effect transistors and bipolar junction transistors, operational amplifiers, and transistors in digital circuits. Electronics design principles via a systems approach is emphasized. S.
  
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    ENGR 398 - Project Management and Communication (1 credit)


    (=PHYS 398 ) (Prereq: ENGR 201 ) This course focuses on effective participation, communication, and collaboration in engineering and other applied science fields. The professional and ethical responsibilities of applied scientists and engineers will be discussed, along with project management principles and current topics of importance in the field. S.
  
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    ENGR 399 Q* - Integrated Science and Design (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and approved contract) In this independent study course, students take concepts of their choosing learned in advanced applied science elective courses and use an engineering approach to either design a solution to a problem integrating those science principles, or study in depth an existing engineering solution. This student experience serves as a bridge between mathematics, the basic sciences and engineering practice. This course may be repeated up to three credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGR 430 - Fluid Mechanics (3 credits)


    (=PHYS 430 ) (Prereq: PHYS 212  or PHYS 213 ) (Coreq: MATH 320 ) This course is an introduction to fluid mechanics, and emphasizes fundamental concepts and problem-solving techniques. Topics to be covered include fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid kinematics, control volume analysis, Reynolds Transport Theorem, momentum theorem, differential analysis and exact solutions, dimensional analysis and an introduction to turbulence. Applications of fluid mechanics will be highlighted. S.
  
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    ENGR 499 Q - Senior Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Students will engage in a structured project either under the direction of a faculty member, via an external internship, or through a project of their own design with instructor permission. This major design experience serves to integrate the knowledge and skills that students have developed in earlier course work through the completion of an original project. Students will be required to utilize project management principles throughout the experience and develop a detailed report to be presented both orally in a public forum and in written form. F, S.

English

  
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    ENGL 101 - Composition (4 credits)


    In ENGL 101, students focus on the writing process, paying special attention to prewriting, writing, and revising strategies. The course also introduces elements of academic writing as well as the research process. This class prompts students to hone their critical reading and writing skills as they consider the rhetorical situations that shape all writing tasks. As a hybrid course, ENGL 101 includes a parallel online component, Coastal Composition Commons, which provides uniform and digitally delivered content reinforcing a common set of student learning outcomes. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 101B - Composition (English as a Second Language) (3 credits)


    A variation of ENGL 101  for students who speak English as a second language. F.
  
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    ENGL 102 - Composition and Critical Reading (4 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ENGL 101 ) In ENGL 102, students read and respond to a variety of texts written across disciplinary lines. As they interpret and evaluate these texts by composing functional, rhetorical, and critical analyses, students extend their understanding of the writing process, consider the importance of context, and refine their approaches to research. This hybrid course includes a parallel online component, Coastal Composition Commons, which builds upon the content taught in ENGL 101  and continues to digitally deliver uniform content that stresses an ongoing set of common student learning outcomes. F, S. Su.
  
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    ENGL 102B - Composition and Literature (English as a Second Language) (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of an ENGL 101  course with a grade of ‘C’ or better). A variation of ENGL 102  for students who speak English as a second language. S.
  
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    ENGL 103 - Rhetoric and Argumentation (3 credits)


    This course provides students with an introduction to rhetorical theory and, as a result, strategies for analyzing the arguments used in a variety of texts. Primarily a course in critical thinking, ENGL 103 supports students’ development as both readers and writers through the application of rhetorical concepts. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 199 - Film Screening Lab (0 to 1 credit)


    Required weekly or biweekly screenings of selected films which facilitate understanding and analysis of cinematic expression and its capacity to produce artistic and social influence. Offered in conjunction with a first-year, sophomore, or upper-division English courses. May be repeated if accompanying different courses.
  
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    ENGL 201 Q* - Introduction to Creative Writing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A course that introduces the fundamental elements of craft involved in composing poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction using a combination of example readings and writing workshops. Students are encouraged, though not required, to complete a college-level literature course before enrolling in ENGL 201. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 205 - Literature and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better). This course is designed to provoke and cultivate students’ imaginative and critical understanding of literature in various cultural contexts. Text (in poetry, drama, fiction, and/or creative nonfiction) will vary by section. Each section will examine compelling themes, styles, and cultural arguments within their literary, historical, and philosophical contexts. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 209 Q* - Blue Ridge to Blue Sea: Cultures of the American South (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101 ) This course will immerse students in diverse perspectives on the American South by investigating the ways in which the multifaceted cultural spaces and histories from “Blue Ridge” to “Blue Sea” are reflected in literature and other media. Alternating F, S.
  
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    ENGL 211 - Introduction to Technical and Professional Writing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Students read and analyze examples of technical, scientific, and professional writing. Writing assignments may include formal and informal reports, sets of instructions, research papers, annotated bibliographies, literature reviews, process analyses, position papers, or mechanism descriptions. Revising and editing skills are taught. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 231 - Film, New Media and Culture (3 credits)


    (=NMDC 231 ) (=DCD 231 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101 ) This course is designed to provoke and cultivate students’ imaginative and critical understanding of film and new media in various cultural contexts. The course promotes an active and critical engagement with film, new media texts, and media innovations as a means for analysis and critique within the broader framework of humanistic inquiry. Texts and films will vary by section. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 250 - Introduction to Language and Linguistic Science (3 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the interrelated elements of the multi-level system we know of as Language. These different levels include: the production of speech sounds and their mental representations, the formation of those speech sounds into words that have meaning, the organization of those words into phrases and sentences, the construction of meaning based on those sentences, and the ways in which social factors interact with and cause variation at each of these levels of the language system. In this course, students use naturally occurring language data to scientifically analyze the rules underlying each of the different levels of the language system. This scientific study of the language system is referred to as Linguistics. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 277 - Literature Across Cultures (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of (1) ENGL 101  and (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 ) This course is designed to introduce students to works of literature in translation from the Eastern and/or Western literary and intellectual traditions. Drawing from a variety of texts, genres, and formats, each section will examine issues of cultural interaction and translation, emphasizing the significance of cross-cultural dialogue and transfer of ideas between world cultures, historical periods, and/or literary movements.
  
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    ENGL 290 - Introduction to Business Communication (3 credits)


    (=CBAD 290 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Students will gain valuable experience with some of the most important types of written and oral communication required in a business and professional context. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 300 - Critical Conversations in English (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) A research-intensive course that offers English majors the opportunity to examine a critical issue current in the discipline of English studies and to participate in a rigorous exchange about this issue with their peers. Depending on the demonstrated scholarly expertise and active research agenda of the instructor, the course will explore a range of theoretical and historical models of reading and reception. English majors should take the course in the first semester of their junior year (or for more advanced majors, during the second semester of their sophomore year). Sections of the course will be offered in both fall and spring semesters and enrollment will be limited to 20 students. This course may be repeated for credit once under a different instructor. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 301 Q* - Forms of Creative Writing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better). Students examine the history, movements, and technical forms of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction using a combination of example readings and writing workshops. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 302 - The Renaissance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A survey of English literature of the Sixteenth Century from Thomas More’s Utopia to William Shakespeare’s comedies and histories.
  
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    ENGL 303 - British Literature I (3 credits)


    (Writing Intensive) (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  and one other 200 level course) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of British literature from its beginning through the eighteenth century, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. F.
  
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    ENGL 304 - British Literature II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  and one other 200 level course) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of British literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. S.
  
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    ENGL 305 - American Literature I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of American literature from its beginnings through the mid-nineteenth century, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. F.
  
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    ENGL 306 - American Literature II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A survey of representative works illustrating the development of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on major literary movements understood in relation to their intellectual, social, and political contexts. S.
  
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    ENGL 307 - The Age of Chaucer (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) Masterpieces of fourteenth-century poetry and drama, including Pearl, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and works of the Wakefield Master. About one-third of the course is devoted to works of Chaucer not read in ENGL 401 .
  
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    ENGL 308 - Seventeenth-Century British Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of the major English poets, dramatists, and prose writers of the Seventeenth Century.
  
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    ENGL 311 - Topics in Shakespeare (3 credits)


    (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) In this course students will be familiarized with plays that represent the spectrum of Shakespeare’s drama, including comedies, tragedies, histories, romances, and problem plays. We may approach these texts from cultural, theatrical, socio-historical, and literary perspectives, and read each play closely as an artistic construction, a script for popular consumption, and a commentary on the political atmosphere of a period both similar to and different from our own. We may also consider the present place of Shakespeare’s drama in diverse cultures around the world. F.
  
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    ENGL 314 - Eighteenth-Century British Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A historical and critical study of the prose and poetry of the principal Eighteenth-Century writers. Emphasis on the works of Dryden, Defoe, Pope, Swift, and others.
  
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    ENGL 315 - The British Novel I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A survey of the British novel from the beginning through the early Victorian era.
  
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    ENGL 316 - The British Novel II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A survey of the British novel from the mid-Victorian era to the present.
  
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    ENGL 317 - The Romantic Age (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of the Eighteenth-Century transition from Classicism to Romanticism and of major Romantic writers.
  
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    ENGL 318 - The Victorian Age (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of major mid-and late-Nineteenth-Century British writers, including Hardy, George Eliot, Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, and others.
  
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    ENGL 320 - Writing Tutor Training (1 credit)


    (=UNIV 320 ) (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) This course introduces students to both theoretical and practical concerns, issues, and questions central to the work of a writing center. As they investigate current trends in writing center scholarship, a variety of writing center models, and their own practices as tutors, students will question the practice of tutoring as they develop their own reflective stances. As it models effective center practices, this course will benefit current tutors, student hoping to tutor, students interested in education, or those considering graduate school. S.
  
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    ENGL 322 - Latin American Literature in Translation (3 credits)


    (=SPAN 322 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) Selected readings of Latin American Literature in translation. Students write primary critical essays. All readings are in English. Even years.
  
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    ENGL 323 - Modern British and Irish Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of the works of British and Irish writers from the turn of the Twentieth Century to 1945.
  
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    ENGL 325 - Colonial and Revolutionary American Literature (3 credits)


    (Writing Intensive) (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of early American literature with emphasis on the religious, philosophical, social, and political aspects.
  
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    ENGL 326 - American Literature 1800-1865 (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A reading of representative works of Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, and other writers of the period.
  
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    ENGL 327 - American Literature 1860-1910 (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of American literature from the Civil War to the early Twentieth Century. Emphasis on the changing attitudes reflected in the works of writers of this period.
  
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    ENGL 328 - Modern American Writers (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of the works of American writers in the first half of the Twentieth Century.
  
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    ENGL 329 - Autobiographies, Journals, and Memoirs (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of selected Eighteenth-, Nineteenth-, and Twentieth-Century autobiographical writing in English. Students read selected Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century autobiographies, journals, and memoirs and explore the ways in which recent writers (in particular women and minorities) have challenged and revised the conventions of this genre. Students are required to produce some autobiographical writing.
  
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    ENGL 330 - Realism and Naturalism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101 , ENGL 102 /ENGL 211  and one other 200 level ENGL class) A course that offers an intensive study of the historical phenomenon of literary realism and naturalism as it emerged in nineteenth-century France literature and its subsequent development in and influence on British and American Literature and drama.
  
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    ENGL 331 - Perspectives on Visual and New Media Studies (3 credits)


    This course develops students’ knowledge of a wide range of new media, digital, and visual texts that are critically analyzed within particular social, historical, political, theoretical, popular, and/or aesthetic contexts. Through various overlapping forms of representation (textual, digital, aural, visual), students explore recurring themes of new media and visual culture. The course features interactive and diverse approaches to assessment, from traditional papers to digital collaborations that show student engagement with visual and new media texts or performances and their literary/cultural contexts. F, S, Su.
  
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    ENGL 332 - Perspectives on American Literature and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course develops students’ knowledge of a wide range of American literary and cultural texts that are critically analyzed within particular social, historical, political, theoretical, popular, and/or aesthetic contexts. Through various overlapping forms of representation (textual, digital, aural, visual), students explore recurring themes of American culture including, but not limited to, American exceptionalism, race relations, the individual vs. the state, the meaning of nature, identity creation/identity crisis, and the politics of voice. The literary and cultural texts that students read, view, and listen to include canonical as well as less heralded titles that the instructor selects from these main sources: poetry, fiction, non-fiction, contemporary video, musical lyric, and/or cinema. The course features interactive and diverse approaches to assessment, from traditional papers to digital collaborations that show student engagement with American texts and their literary/cultural contexts. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 333 - The American Novel (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of selected American novels.
  
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    ENGL 334 - Perspectives on British Literature and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course develops students’ knowledge of a wide range of British literary and cultural texts that are critically analyzed within particular social, historical, political, theoretical, popular, and/or aesthetic contexts. Through various overlapping forms of representation (textual, digital, aural, visual), students explore the major social, cultural, and political concerns of British literature and culture, including industrialization and urbanization, ideologies of class and gender, nation and empire, scientific progress and religious crisis, technological innovation, and modernization. The literary and cultural texts that students read, view, and listen to include canonical as well as lesser known titles that the instructor selects from these main sources: poetry, fiction, non-fiction, contemporary video, musical lyric, and / or cinema. The course features interactive and diverse approaches to assessment, from traditional papers to digital collaborations that show student engagement with British texts and their literary/cultural contexts. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 335 - Perspectives on World and Anglophone Literature and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course develops students’ knowledge of a wide range of World and Anglophone literary and cultural texts that are critically analyzed within particular cultural, historical, political, theoretical, popular, and/or aesthetic contexts. Through various overlapping forms of representation (textual, digital, aural, visual), students explore diverse and recurring themes in World and Anglophone texts. The course features interactive and diverse approaches to assessment, from traditional papers to digital collaborations that show student engagement with visual and new media texts or performances and their literary/cultural contexts. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 336 - Contemporary American Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of the literary trends in America from 1945 to the present.
  
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    ENGL 337 - Perspectives on Genre (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course develops students’ knowledge of a particular genre through the study of a variety of literary and/or cultural texts that share (generic) features of form, style, and/or purpose. We analyze the texts as well as the genre in light of their engagement with the aesthetic, cultural, material, and historical contexts within which they are embedded and/or that they adapt and appropriate. While attending to the similarities among generically connected texts, we also study the critical nuances of their differences that enrich our understanding of the genre. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 338 - Perspectives on a Single Author (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course develops students’ focused understanding of literary and/or cultural works by a particular author. Through our close readings and in-depth analyses of the text/s as well as our critical study of the temporal and cultural contexts within which the author’s work/s were produced and received, we understand texts as cultural artifacts of their times that reflect the author’s and their contemporary society’s investments and preoccupations. At the same time, we analyze how our transhistorical and transcultural interest in the work/s of the author are sustained by our ability to engage with the text/s and interpret it/them through diverse critical and theoretical lenses. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 339 - Popular Fiction (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  and one other 200 level ENGL class) What makes popular fiction popular? Why do we find pleasure in reading these texts? How are the various genres (detective, hard-boiled crime, western romance, horror, fantasy, science fiction, and thriller) structured and what cultural viewpoints do these formulas reinforce? As we read and discuss sample of each genre, including works by Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, Louis L’Amour, Stephen King, J.R.R. Tolkein, and Octavia Bulter, we will be looking at the texts through the critical lenses of literary theory, including psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxist, and structuralist approaches. We will also use this study of popular fiction to raise questions about authorship, readership, literary value, and the mass marketing strategies used to sell these texts.
  
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    ENGL 341 - African-American Literature, 1750-present (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A survey of Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century literature. Emphasis on the classic works of Frederick Douglass, Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, and Ralph Ellison.
  
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    ENGL 350 - Language Variation in North America (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) Language variation in North America is considered from a contemporary sociolinguistic perspective. The course covers social, regional, ethnic, gender and style-related language variation among (English) speakers in the United States and Canada. The course will also explore issues of perception and attitude as reflected in evaluations of language varieties and the speakers of those varieties.
  
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    ENGL 351 - Language, Gender and Power (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  and one other 200 level ENGL class) The course investigates language structure and usage patterns in the context of gender to achieve a better understanding of the way language references, and the perceptions, attitudes and behaviors related to these differences are examined.
  
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    ENGL 352 - African American English (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  and one other 200 level ENGL class) A course that explores African American English from a linguistics and social perspective. Course content will focus on hypotheses of the development of African American English, linguistic theory as applied to African American English, and social/cultural dimensions of African American English.
  
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    ENGL 353 - Sounds of English (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course introduces the systematic study of the sounds of the English language. Beginning with descriptions of the articulation of sounds through discussions of the acoustic properties of sounds and ending with the ways in which sounds work together to form the words that we have in the English language, the course examines all elements of the English sound. English vowel and consonant sounds are not static entities and we examine the variation in such sounds across English dialects. Application of phonetic and phonological methods in “real world” situations is also highlighted. This course is ideal for students interested in linguistics, speech language pathology, foreign languages, English as a second language, and education. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 354 - English Grammar and Syntax (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) This course examines individual components of modern English grammar from a formal perspective in the formation of phrases, clauses, and sentences. Students will analyze the patterned, rule governed nature of language through a study of syntax in standard and nonstandard varieties of English, especially in examples of written texts, and will apply grammar concepts to their own writing.
  
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    ENGL 362 - Fiction I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) An introductory creative writing workshop course in which students study published contemporary short stories and create original works of short fiction. Students read and critique both published and student work. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 365 - Creative Nonfiction I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) An introductory creative writing workshop course in which students study published contemporary narrative nonfiction and create original nonfiction essays. Students read and critique both published and student work. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 368 - Poetry I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) An introductory creative writing workshop course in which students study published contemporary poetry and create original poems. Students read and critique both published and student work. F, S.
  
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    ENGL 371 - Topics in World Literature: East/West Intersections (3 credits)


    (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101  (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) This course extends students’ understanding of and experiences in different cultures of the world by examining issues of cross-cultural interaction and transfer of ideas between and within world cultures, historical periods, and/or literary movements. The course will also introduce students to some strategies of literary criticism and research on world authors through examination of critical texts appropriate to the topic. In particular, this course will sharpen awareness of the various intersections between traditions of the East and West. Alternating F, S.
 

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