Dec 08, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Business Administration

  
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    CBAD 222 - Brown Scholars Seminar (Restricted to Brown Scholars) (0 to 2 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) A series of workshops designed to help the Brown Scholars develop leadership and organizational skills and to plan activities for the students in the Each 1 Teach 1 Entrepreneurship Institute. Topics will include time management, team dynamics, project management and leadership development. Students will apply their leadership and organizational skills by designing activities and organizing a fundraiser. This course may be repeated for credit. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 290 - Integrated Business Communication (3 credits)


    (=ENGL 290 ) The course examines methods of business communication with key stakeholders and provides practical applications for written, oral, and interpersonal communications.
  
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    CBAD 291 - Business Statistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in UNIV 110 , CSCI 110 , and a grade of ‘C’ or better in one of the following: MATH 138 , MATH 130 , MATH 132 , or MATH 160 ) Basic methods of descriptive statistics and statistical inference; probability, hypothesis testing, and linear regression with an emphasis on decision making in business. Students who complete CBAD 291 may not receive credit for PSYC 225  or STAT 201 . F, S.
  
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    CBAD 292 - Decision Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 291 ) Emphasis on logical/rational decision making using Microsoft Excel to implement decision support models and techniques to solve real world problems. Topics include modeling of risk and uncertainty, forecasting, and constrained resource optimization. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 297 Q - Internship Experience (0 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 120 ) The Internship Experience is a supervised work experience in a business setting. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to establish specific learning goals, keep track of their hours and/or activities, complete a final project or reflective essay regarding the experience, and will have their performance evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of sixty (60) hours in the internship environment per credit hour earned. Students may receive from zero to twelve (0 - 12) credit hours for the Internship Experience course. The course may be repeated up to three times. F, S, Su.
  
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    CBAD 301 Q* - Management and Organizations (3 credits)


    Survey of the basic principles of management with emphasis on social and behavioral issues, provides the basis for thinking about complex business situations in the framework of the management process. F, S, Su.
  
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    CBAD 344 - Legal Environment of Business (3 credits)


    The legal and judicial system, the law and business (tort, contracts, agency, business organizations), government and regulations, and government protection. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 345 - Commercial Law (3 credits)


    The law of contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code, including the sale of goods, commercial paper, bank deposits and collections, secured transactions, debtor and creditor rights, bailments and bankruptcy. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 350 Q* - Marketing (3 credits)


    A study of the marketing of goods and services, including legal, social, economic, and technological considerations; consumer behavior and target markets; product; pricing; promotion; channels of distribution, and development of marketing strategy. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 360 - Stock Market Challenge (1 credit)


    Offers participation in a realistic stock market simulation. Students compete in managing a portfolio of stocks. Open to all students in the University. Pass/Fail grading only. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
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    CBAD 363 - Business Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 201 , CBAD 291  or STAT 201 , ECON 101  or ECON 201 , and a grade of ‘C’ or better in one of the following: MATH 130 , MATH 132 , MATH 138 , or MATH 160 ) Theoretical foundation of optimal financial policy with an emphasis on working capital, capital budgeting, financing, and dividend decisions and how they affect the valuation of the firm. F, S, Su.
  
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    CBAD 364 Q* - Operations Management (3 credits)


    (=HRTM 364 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 292  and CBAD 301 ) (Coreq or prereq: CBAD 350  and CBAD 363 ) An introduction to the design, operation, and improvement of service, manufacturing, and distribution processes. The integration of operations management with other organizational functions to achieve strategic goals is discussed throughout the course. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 366 - Introduction to Real Estate (3 credits)


    An overview of legal, governmental, and market forces which combine with land and materials to form the unique commodity called real estate. Introduces career opportunities, decision methodologies, and market dynamics in the areas of finance, appraisal, market analyses, brokerage, and property management.
  
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    CBAD 373 Q* - Business Integration and Application (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ECON 202  and CBAD 202 ) (Coreq or prereq: CBAD 292 , CBAD 301 , CBAD 350 , and CBAD 363 ) This course reviews key concepts from the pre-core courses in financial and managerial accounting, micro and macroeconomics, and expands understanding of core courses in marketing, finance, and management. This course provides an appreciation for how accounting, finance, management, and marketing principles work together in a business environment. A simulation will be used to assist in the application of basic concepts to a real world work environment. In this course we emphasize thinking critically and ethically about complex problems and effective oral and written communication. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 393 - Management Information Systems (3 credits)


    (=HRTM 393 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 110  or equivalent and CBAD 301 ) A study of the use of information systems in business, emphasis is on the identification of practical, managerial, and ethical dilemmas related to the development, implementation, and use of information systems. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 399 - Independent Study


    Written contract between the student and the instructor, and approved by the dean. A maximum of 15 credit hours of Business Administration 399 and CBAD 499  combined may be taken.
  
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    CBAD 401 - International Business (3 credits)


    Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 120 , CBAD 301 , and CBAD 350 ) A study of the significant aspects of international business operations, including historical development of foreign trade policy and operative problems of international business operations, principle areas of study are: international business and the nation-state, assessing and forecasting the international business environment, and managing the multinational enterprise. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 402 Q - Study Abroad in International Business (0 credits)


    (Restricted to students participating in an approved study abroad experience) A course requiring travel to a foreign country that prepares students to better understand and evaluate the different approaches taken by companies and organizations from different national backgrounds. Focus will be on the economic, sociocultural, and political-legal environments of a foreign country, including how business practices differ from those used by companies here in the United States. (Requires travel abroad.) This course may be repeated to denote each study abroad experience. F, S, Su.
  
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    CBAD 403 - Actuarial Science Exam Preparation (1 credit)


    (=MATH 403 ) This course is required for a minor. Serves as a testing and preparation opportunity for students planning to sit for the three associate level Actuarial Science exams.
  
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    CBAD 411 Q* - Law and Resort Tourism Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 344 ; HRTM majors must have also completed HRTM 180  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course enables managers to understand the law and particular legal aspects as they relate to the hospitality industry, to appreciate the unique legal and regulatory structures & processes confronted in the industry, to be better able to engage effectively with legal counsel, regulatory agencies, courts, and to identify strategic management initiatives for prevention of situations which lead to legal actions and liability in the industry. Offered as needed.
  
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    CBAD 412 - Marketing Law (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 344 ) The course provides students with an overview of legal issues related to the marketing function of organizations, the legal structures and regulatory processes that govern marketing at the federal, state and local levels. Specific legal topics include protection of intellectual property; law of sales of goods, product liability and warranties; anti-trust law; consumer protection, regulation of unfair and deceptive acts in commerce, commercial free speech, and trends in the law of marketing. The course focuses on the role of managers and tools in making decisions that comply with legal expectations, leverage marketing law to strategic advantage, prevent legal disputes and effectively manage marketing legal processes. The course goal is to educate future managers on making more informed decisions when confronted with potential legal issues regarding the marketing function and to effectively deal with legal counsel in their resolution. Offered as needed.
  
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    CBAD 413 - Legal Aspects of Real Estate (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CBAD 344  or permission of the instructor) The course provides an introduction to the law and legal environment governing real estate. The course covers such topics as the Nature of Real Property and Rights; Real Estate Transactions, Regulatory Structures Governing Real Estate, Land Use and Environmental Considerations; Landlord-Tenant Relationships; Liability Issues, Consumer Protection, and Global Real Estate Issues. The course goal is to train individuals in real estate careers on the legal environment of real estate, legal astuteness in dealing with real estate counsel and regulatory bodies, and to better make informed strategic decisions on real estate issues and their implications to stakeholders. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 426 - Managerial Economics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 ) Study of the theory of the firm, elasticity, product and cost, market concentration and integration. Topics include differing market environments, market power, pricing strategies, market failure, and subsequent government intervention.
  
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    CBAD 460 - Capital Budgeting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 363 ) Financial theory and techniques for the analysis and solution of financial problems dealing with asset management. Major emphasis is on the management of long-term assets; however, working capital management will also be covered. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 478 Q - Strategic Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 , CBAD 350 , CBAD 363 , and CBAD 373 ) Analysis of case problems dealing with the formulation and implementation of organizational strategy and policy, including appraisal of the external environment, top management, marketing, finance, operations, human resources, and the organizational structure. F, S.
  
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    CBAD 497 Q - Business Internship (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: junior standing, minimum GPA of 2.5, and approval of the Director of the Wall Center for Excellence) The Business Internship is a supervised work experience in a business setting. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to maintain a detailed journal relative to their workplace activities, establish specific learning goals, complete a reflective essay regarding the experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of sixty (60) hours in the internship environment per credit hour earned. Students may receive from three to twelve (3-12) credit hours for the Business Internship course, which may be repeated up to three (3) times for credit; however, students cannot earn more than a total of twelve (12) business internship credit hours over the course of a single undergraduate program and only six (6) credit hours may be applied toward the minimum credit hours required for a single Coastal Carolina University degree. F, S, Su.
  
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    CBAD 498 - Industry Field Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the dean) Structured around visits to selected corporations and organizations where management officials will discuss matters confronting today’s businessmen, this course is designed to bridge the gap between the classroom and the real world of business. An honors course consisting of students selected by the Wall College of Business Administration on the basis of academic achievement.
  
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    CBAD 499 - Selected Topics in Business (0-3 credits)


    Provides Business Administration majors an opportunity to study in small groups, selected topics in business/economics under the guidance of a faculty member. A maximum of 15 credit hours of CBAD 399  and CBAD 499 combined may be taken. This course may be repeated up to three times for credit.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 101 - Introductory Chemistry (3 credits)


    (Coreq: CHEM 101L ) A one semester survey course in chemistry designed primarily for non-science majors. Engineering, science, pre-med, and other majors requiring more than one semester of chemistry should not enroll in this course. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 101L - Introductory Chemistry Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: CHEM 101 ) A one semester course in chemistry laboratory designed primarily for non-science majors. Engineering, Science, Pre-Med, and other majors requiring more than one semester of chemistry should not enroll in this course. Three lecture hours per week. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 104 - Kitchen Chemistry (3 credits)


    (Coreq: CHEM 104L ) This course is designed to integrate chemistry and cooking. An investigation of the chemical and physical properties of food, and the performing experiments that effect the flavor and characteristics of these foods based on these chemical and physical properties. Su.
  
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    CHEM 104L - Kitchen Chemistry Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: CHEM 104 ) This course is designed to integrate chemistry and cooking. An investigation of the chemical and physical properties of food, and the performing experiments that effect the flavor and characteristics of these foods based on these chemical and physical properties. Su.
  
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    CHEM 109 - Problem Solving in Chemistry (3 credits)


    This course focuses on the development of problem solving skills necessary to successfully solve problems in general chemistry. The course looks at various methods of problem solving pertaining to topics including dimensional analysis, stoichiometry, titrations, calorimetry and various others topics related to general chemistry. F, S.
  
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    CHEM 111 - General Chemistry I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of the ALEKS online course immediately prior to the semester taking General Chemistry I) (Coreq: CHEM 111L ) A survey of chemical structure, reactivity and physical properties. Topics include dimensional analysis, atomic theory, chemical nomenclature, gas laws, and thermodynamics. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 111L - General Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit)


    (Coreq or Prereq: CHEM 111 ) This course is an introduction to qualitative inorganic reaction chemistry and quantitative methods of chemical analysis, three hours per week. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 112 - General Chemistry II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 111 /CHEM 111L ) (Coreq: CHEM 112L ) A continuation of CHEM 111  to include intra- and intermolecular bonding theory, quantitative treatment of chemical kinetics, aqueous solution equilibria, and electrochemistry. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 112L - General Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit)


    (Coreq or Prereq: CHEM 112 ) This course consists of laboratory methods of quantitative study of chemical kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 150 - Communication in Physical Science (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 111  or PHYS 137 ) This course is a basic introduction to various forms of communication of scientific information in the physical sciences. The utilization of library resources, electronic resources and journals in research, project development and presentation is reviewed. Search techniques as well as critical evaluation of the material retrieved are discussed as they relate to developing a new project, or reviewing the current status of research in a given topic. Students are expected to present findings and research in both oral and written forms. Exposure to ongoing research projects within the department is integral to this course. S.
  
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    CHEM 299 - Introduction to Research (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CHEM 112 /CHEM 112L ) This course is a basic introduction to the utilization of library resources, electronic resources and journals in research. Search techniques as well as critical evaluation of the material obtained are discussed as it relates to developing a new project, or reviewing the current status of research in a given topic. Exposure to ongoing research projects within the department is integral to this course. Offered as needed.
  
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    CHEM 301 - Workshop Leader Training (1 credit)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and acceptance into the Department of Chemistry workshop leader program) This course focuses on the preparation of leaders for workshops in chemistry. Learning theory, group dynamics, pedagogy, and student development as they apply to chemistry workshops are covered. The course is also used to review workshop and related course materials. Enrollment in this course at least once is a requirement for all chemistry workshop leaders. S.
  
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    CHEM 306 - Chemical Demonstrations (1 credit)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CHEM 112 ) A lab based course that focuses on techniques required for conducting chemical demonstrations. Techniques include preparing handout materials, preparing solutions and presenting demonstrations in front of various types of audiences. The course meets one time per week for three hours. This course may be repeated two times for credit. F, S.
  
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    CHEM 311 - Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 112 ) This course deals with concepts and models of inorganic chemistry including electronic structure, the periodic table, bonding, thermodynamics, solvent systems, oxidation and reduction, periodic trends of the chemistry of main group elements, and an overview of transition metal chemistry. S.
  
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    CHEM 321 - Quantitative Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 112 /CHEM 112L ) (Coreq: CHEM 321L ) Theory and practice of “wet” analytical methods including statistics, volumetric analysis, simple and coupled aqueous equilibria, including spreadsheet analysis and simulation methods. Fundamentals of spectrophotometry and potentiometry. F.
  
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    CHEM 321L - Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: CHEM 321 ) The practice and application of “wet” analytical methods including solution preparation, volumetric, spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. F.
  
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    CHEM 331 - General Organic Chemistry I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 112 /CHEM 112L ) (Coreq: CHEM 331L ) Nomenclature, synthesis, and reactions of carbon compounds. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 331L - General Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit)


    (Coreq: CHEM 331 ) A survey of laboratory methods of organic chemistry. F, S, Su.
  
  
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    CHEM 332L - General Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CHEM 331L ) (Coreq: CHEM 332 ) Laboratory exercises to accompany CHEM 332 . F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 341 - Introduction to Statistical Thermodynamics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 212  and MATH 161 ) Students may not take both CHEM 341 and PHYS 341  for credit. Statistical thermodynamics provides a link between the microscopic and bulk properties of matter. The course begins with the derivation of the Boltzmann distribution and the partition function followed by the use of the partition function to obtain thermodynamic information about various systems. The partition function is further developed to investigate the translational, rotational and vibrational modes of motion. Finally, the equations developed are applied to the energies of modes of motion, the heat capacities of substances, residual entropies, and the equilibrium consistent of a reaction and its variation with temperature.
  
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    CHEM 351 - Biochemistry I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 332 /CHEM 332L ) (Coreq: CHEM 351L ) Three 1-hour lectures. Structure and function of amino acids, peptides, and proteins. Enzyme kinetics and mechanisms. Membrane structure and function. Metabolism principles glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and oxidative phosphorylation. Carbohydrates and fatty acid metabolisms. Photosynthesis. F.
  
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    CHEM 351L - Biochemistry Laboratory I (1 credit)


    (Coreq: CHEM 351 ) This course covers experiments designed to reinforce those topics covered in the lecture. Protein analysis and purification, enzyme activity determination, lipid extraction and analysis, and electrophoretic analyses. F.
  
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    CHEM 352 - Biochemistry II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 351 /CHEM 351L ) (Coreq: CHEM 352L ) Three 1-hour lectures. Structure and function of mononucleotides, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. Lipid and amino acid synthesis. Organization, replication, repair and expression of DNA. Viruses, receptors and information transfer. Biotechnology methods and applications of DNA restriction, sequencing, cloning and probing. S.
  
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    CHEM 352L Q* - Biochemistry Laboratory II (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CHEM 351 /CHEM 351L ) (Coreq: CHEM 352 ) This course covers experiments designed to reinforce those topics covered in the lecture: protein synthesis, nucleic acid extractions, and electrophoretic analyses. S.
  
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    CHEM 353 - Physical Biochemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: PHYS 205  or PHYS 211 , MATH 160 , CHEM 351 , and CHEM 351L ) (Coreq: CHEM 353L ) This course develops mathematically the physical principles in chemistry and how they are applied to tackle important problems in biochemistry, biology and medicine. Topics include laws of thermodynamics applied to biological molecules, kinetics of life processes, including the rate of reactions, and applying the laws to complex biological processes, the dynamics of microscopic systems, and general features of spectroscopy with applications to biological systems in the area of photobiology. S.
  
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    CHEM 353L - Physical Biochemistry Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: CHEM 353 ) This course will focus on experiments that will provide insight into the physical principles of chemistry and how they are applied to tackle important problems in biochemistry, biology and medicine. We will spend time on spectroscopic techniques including UV-VIS, fluorescence and NMR techniques, data collection, data manipulation and scientific writing. We will also familiarize ourselves with software used for theoretical quantum calculations of biological molecules. S.
  
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    CHEM 354 - Techniques in Biotechnology and Biochemistry (4 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 112 /CHEM 112L ) This course is designed to give student laboratory experience to better prepare them for graduate school and the job market. The techniques students can anticipate learning are: basic spectrophotometry, enzymology, protein purification from a crude tissue sample, ELISA, Western Blot, macromolecular synthesis, molecular cloning, SDS-PAGE and DNA electrophoresis. The lecture is designed to present the theory of each laboratory exercise, new technologies, science ethics and job preparation skills. F.
  
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    CHEM 361 - Chemical Reaction Kinetics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 332 /CHEM 332L  and MATH 161 ) This course introduces the principle of chemical kinetics, the study of reaction rates and how these rates may be measured and interpreted. This leads reaction mechanisms and the analysis of elementary steps of reactions. Following this, complex reactions such as, chain reactions, polymerization and photochemical reactions are studied. Lastly, a discussion of diffusion-controlled and activation-controlled reactions is presented. F.
  
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    CHEM 371 - Nuclear Chemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PHYS 212 , CHEM 112 , and MATH 160 ) This course introduces the nature of radiation and radioactivity; the study of decay processes; the introduction to properties of atomic nuclei; nuclear processes in chemical, biological, medical and environmental applications of radioactivity. Kinetics and Energetics of Nuclear Reactions, Nuclear stability, fission, and nuclear fusion would be covered. Chemical techniques, radiation safety and nuclear instrumentation would also be addressed. The use of nuclear processes in non-radioactive areas of human activity such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in synthetic organic chemistry, in physical chemistry and for structural analysis in macromolecular chemistry will be discussed. F.
  
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    CHEM 372 - Organometallics (2 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of CHEM 332 /CHEM 332L ) (Coreq: CHEM 372L ) Course focuses on providing students with an environment similar to graduate school. Students will engage directly with the primary literature in the field of organometallics, have weekly group meetings, and give oral presentations covering both ‘classic’ and ‘current’ journal articles. Organometallic concepts such as the 18-electron rule, metal oxidation states, Lewis acid-base chemistry, ligand and reaction types, mechanisms and catalytic cycles will be covered and related to both the literature and work occurring in the laboratory portion of this course. Lecture meets twice per week. S, odd years.
  
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    CHEM 372L - Organometallics Laboratory (2 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of CHEM 332 /CHEM 332L ) (Coreq: CHEM 372 ) Course focuses on providing students with an environment similar to graduate school. In lab, students will engage directly with the primary literature in the field of organometallics, develop a retrosynthetic route for synthesizing a target macromolecule, learn new computer software for molecular modeling, gain experience on high-end instrumentation, and learn to work as a successful member of a research team. Laboratory meets twice per week. S, odd years.
  
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    CHEM 398 - Junior Chemistry Seminar (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CHEM 299 ) This course covers oral and written presentations of literature research papers. Review of library and online searching in bibliography development. Critical review of peer manuscripts and presentations. Career planning and management. Offered as needed.
  
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    CHEM 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor and approved contract) Directed study and/or research on specific topics. F, S, Su.
  
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    CHEM 405 - Principles of Physical Chemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 112 , PHYS 202  or PHYS 212 , and MATH 160 ) This course covers the fundamental principles of chemical and physical changes as related to bulk properties and molecular structure, especially as they are related to biochemical processes. Topics are: gas properties, kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium quantum chemistry, spectroscopy and statistical thermodynamics. Offered as needed.
  
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    CHEM 411 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 332 /CHEM 332L  or permission of the instructor) (Coreq: CHEM 411L ) Concepts and models in inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure and the periodic table, bonding and symmetry requirements, transition metal compounds, crystal theory, and spectroscopic methods for inorganic compound identification. S, alternate years.
  
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    CHEM 411L - Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: CHEM 411 ) Synthesis and characterization of selected inorganic compounds. This experimental work supplements the theoretical material presented in CHEM 411 . S, alternate years.
  
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    CHEM 422 - Instrumental Analysis (2 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 321 /CHEM 321L  and CHEM 331 ) (Coreq: CHEM 422L ) Theory and applications of instrumental methods of analysis. Electrochemical methods, spectroscopy, chromatographic methods, resonance methods and mass spectroscopy are studied. The experiments to be performed are tailored to fulfill the needs of the different areas of emphasis within the chemistry program. S.
  
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    CHEM 422L - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 321 /CHEM 321L ) (Coreq: CHEM 422 ) Experiments are performed that are project-based. Successful completion of these projects generally involves the use and mastery of several instruments discussed in lecture. S.
  
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    CHEM 425 - Electrochemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 112 ) Basic fundamentals of electrochemical reactions as they relate to the various areas of chemistry will be covered. Applications of electrochemistry in batteries, fuel cells, corrosion, electroanalytical methods, biochemical processes and other current areas of interest will be discussed. S, alternate years, as needed.
  
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    CHEM 433 - Advanced Organic Chemistry (2 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 332 /CHEM 332L ) The course supplements and extends the knowledge base of CHEM 331 -CHEM 332 . The subject matter includes a look at some general methods used to study mechanistic pathways and how the data obtained can be interpreted to deduce the accepted mechanisms for selected types of reactions. Also included is a study of synthetic organic reactions and their applications as well as a look at methods for determining the structures of unknown organic compounds. F, alternate years.
  
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    CHEM 433L - Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2 credits)


    (Coreq: CHEM 433 ) The experiments and assignments supplement the materials presented in CHEM 433  and include the study of mechanisms, syntheses, and identification of identification of unknown compounds and mixtures. F, alternate years.
  
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    CHEM 441 - Physical Chemistry I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 161 , PHYS 212 , and CHEM 112 ) (Coreq: CHEM 441L ) Theories and laws relating to chemical and physical changes including gas properties, thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases and kinetics of chemical reactions. F.
  
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    CHEM 441L - Physical Chemistry I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CHEM 321 ) (Coreq: CHEM 441 ) Applications of physical chemistry techniques. F.
  
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    CHEM 442 - Physical Chemistry II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 161 , PHYS 212 , and CHEM 112 ) (Coreq: CHEM 442L ) Theories and laws relating to molecular structure including quantum chemistry, statistical thermodynamics, determination of molecular structure and electric and magnetic properties of molecules. S.
  
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    CHEM 442L - Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CHEM 441L ) (Coreq: CHEM 442 ) Application of physical chemistry techniques for the determination of molecular structure. S.
  
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    CHEM 443 - Atmospheric Chemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CHEM 112  or a grade of ‘C’ or better in MATH 160 ) This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental chemistry of the atmosphere. The emphasis of the first third of the semester will be laying a foundation of understanding the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The second two thirds will focus on current issues. Indoor air pollution is also addressed. Offered as needed.
  
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    CHEM 450 - Principles of Biochemistry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHEM 331  and permission of the instructor) (Coreq: CHEM 450L ) A survey of the fundamental principles of biochemistry. Offered as needed.
  
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    CHEM 450L - Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: CHEM 331 /CHEM 331L  and permission of the instructor) (Coreq: CHEM 450 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. Offered as needed.
  
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    CHEM 499 - Directed Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: A contract must be approved by the instructor and the department chair by the time of registration) Structured undergraduate research projects conducted with faculty direction and participation. Projects explore chemical or related problems using the scientific method. F, S, Su.

Chinese

  
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    CHIN 110 - Introductory Chinese I (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.
  
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    CHIN 120 - Introductory Chinese II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: CHIN 110  or permission of the instructor) A continuation of CHIN 110 . Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, listening, reading and writing.
  
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    CHIN 350 - Chinese Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Approval from the department chair of the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies) Language study abroad with instruction by native speaking instructors. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment. F, S, Su.

Communication

  
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    COMM 101 - Introduction to Communication (3 credits)


    Introduces students to the study of communication and its history, theories, and principles, and serves to improve students’ critical thinking, perception, and communicative awareness. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 140 - Modern Human Communication: Principles and Practices (3 credits)


    Communication is the study of human interaction. This course provides students with an overview of the practical applications and theoretical approaches to the study of communication through an exploration of four key areas: interpersonal, intercultural, group, and public communication. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 150 - Media, Self and the World (3 credits)


    (=COMM 150H ) Examines the many ways media systems and mediated communication shape our understanding of ourselves and our world. How various media (e.g., television, internet, newspapers) interact and deliver content (e.g., entertainment, news, advertising) that influence the “real world” are examined. Also looks at how new technologies allow easier direct access to content. Special attention is given to how students can apply media literacy skills to their academic and personal lives. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    COMM 160 - Persuasion (3 credits)


    An introduction to the study and practice of persuasive discourse using both the rhetorical and social science traditions. Issues examined include: strategic planning and organization, audience analysis, motives and values, effective use of language, propaganda and the abuse of persuasion, campaign planning, effective presentation techniques, and the application of theory and research on persuasion to practical situations. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    COMM 206 - Introduction to Sports Communication (3 credits)


    This course examines how we communicate about sport, how sport is communicated to us, and what is communicated by sports—each represents critical opportunities to evaluate, critique, and improve our public culture. This course provides a survey of the many approaches in communication studies of sport, focusing on different communicative contexts including interpersonal, mediated, organizational, and public communication. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    COMM 210 - Introduction to Communication Studies (3 credits)


    This course is designed to introduce students to the Communication Studies Concentration. Special attention will be given to what constitutes applied communication, modern, classical, and critical ways that communication is studied and measured, and what professional routes are available to students in the concentration. F, S, Su.
  
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    COMM 274 - Organizational Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Examines communication systems and communication flow in formal organizations and deals with communication climate, leadership, work control systems networks and performance enhancement and evaluation. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 275 - Communication Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Provides an in-depth survey of theories and relevant criticism in communication and prepares students for theoretical application in research and thesis preparation. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 276 - Communication Research (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Topics covered include: how to isolate problem statements, distinguish independent and dependent variables, criticize and evaluate definitions, define theories, understand how to apply methods of sound research (qualitative and quantitative), collect data, and analyze scholarly articles. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 301 - Intercultural Communication (3 credits)


    (=LIS 301 ) Focuses on the dynamics of how culture influences the communication process. Considers topics such as the roles of rituals and social dramas and provides an extensive and relevant discussion of different worldviews to gain “cultural competency.” F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 302 - Communication Law and Ethics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Covers legal cases and ethical issues as they apply to communication problems, precedents and negligence or oversight in corporations and organizations. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 304 - Gender Communication (3 credits)


    Examines connections among four areas of study: gender, identity, culture, and communication. Explores the multiple ways gender roles are created and sustained through communication in contexts such as: families, schools, the workplace, and media. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 306 - Sports Media (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 206 ) Traditional assignments and graded material featuring critical application of course information are joined to practical field assignments to prepare students for the near-term career market. Topics may include the relationships between sports media and sports media professionals, collegiate and professional sports industries, athletes, audiences, and social media, including their history, impact, and ethical implications. Class time may feature guest lecturers from across the sports industry. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    COMM 311 - Health Communication (3 credits)


    An overview of the various areas of study within the health communication field. Explores multiple communication issues relevant to health, including language; information processing; the social construction of health and illness; patient-doctor communication; and the mutually influential relationships among health care professionals, patients, family members and friends, and cultural institutions. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 314 - Video Production and Practice (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140 ) Introduces students to the foundational basics of video production. Through individual and team activities, students build skills in video composition, framing, lighting, audio, and other production proficiencies while gaining an understanding of the technology and theory behind video production. F, S, Su.
  
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    COMM 323 - Imagery of Advertising (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 101  or JOUR 201 ) A study of the communicative power of advertisements; introduces concepts and techniques used by advertisers to create, target, and place advertisements through various media. Through critical inquiry and rhetorical analysis, students look beyond the surface of an advertisement and recognize what it says to consumers and about our culture. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 330 - Communication and Technology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140  or JOUR 201 ) A broad survey of communication and technology with an emphasis on the relationship between the medium and the message. Covers diffusion of technologies; theoretical, historical, and philosophical perspectives on the use of communication tools; and implications for individuals and society. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    COMM 334 - Small Group Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: COMM 140  or ENGL 390 ) The study and practice of small group communication through creative approaches to problem solving.
  
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    COMM 337 - Rhetoric and Communication (3 credits)


    Equips students with the ability to identify, interpret and critique rhetorical messages in communication artifacts, such as speeches, music videos, commercials and other media. The class examines the relationships between communicators, texts, and audiences. Special attention will be given to rhetoric’s role in popular culture. F, S, M, Su.
 

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