Jan 23, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Art History

  
  •  

    ARTH 219 - Islamic Art and Architecture (3 credits)


    This course serves an introduction to pre-modern Islamic artistic and architectural traditions in the Mediterranean, Middle East, Central Asia and India. Students will learn how Islamic beliefs have shaped these traditions and the importance of cultural exchange between the Islamic world and the rest of Africa, Asia, and Europe. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 237 - The Contemporary Graphic Novel (3 credits)


    This course examines the historical, cultural, artistic, literary and theoretical underpinnings of book-length graphic novels. After examining the history of the sequential narrative in various media, the course will focus on the mechanics of visual/textual storytelling and analyze a wide range of approaches to the discipline. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 240 - American Art (3 credits)


    A survey of the fine arts, popular arts, architecture, and material culture of the United States, taking into consideration important events in social, political, and economic history from the time of British colonies to the mid twentieth century. F.
  
  •  

    ARTH 250 Q* - Concepts in Art History (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTH 106 , and ARTH 105  or ARTH 107 ) This course provides an introduction to aesthetics, art theory, and art criticism, as well as a foundation in the practice of research and writing in the arts. We will read theoretical and critical writing on art and art history, explore questions about the nature of art, and work with a number of theories and methodologies by which to understand art. Students will be introduced to the skills necessary to think, research, and write clearly. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 255 - American Film (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of an ARTH 100 level course with a grade of ‘C’ or better or permission of the instructor) This course will give students a criteria for interpreting film within an historical context while introducing major genres, significant directors and influential screen actors from the formative years of this art. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 266 - Arts of China (3 credits)


    This course serves as an introduction to the visual and intellectual richness of Chinese art and architecture from the Neolithic period to the present. Some topics covered will include Shang and Zhou ritual bronze vessels, the Terracotta Army, Buddhism in China, Landscape Painting, the Forbidden City, Porcelain Production and Chinese Contemporary Art. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 288 - Arts of Japan (3 credits)


    This course introduces the art and architecture of Japan, from prehistory to the present. Some topics covered include the function of art in ancient Japan, Buddhist art and architecture, samurai patronage, gardens, the tea ceremony, woodblock prints, and contemporary art. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ARTH 308 - History of Photography (3 credits)


    A survey of the history of photography from 1839 to the present. This course explores photography from pre-photographic visual technologies to the current revolution of digital visual media. In addition to fine art photography, we will consider a variety of photographic genres, for example, documentary and landscape photography, portraiture, and family snapshots.
  
  •  

    ARTH 311 - Modern African Art and Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTH 105 , ARTH 106  or ARTH 107 ) This course explores modern and contemporary African cultural expression through its visual arts. Specific investigations will include genres such as painting, sculpture, photography, fashion, film, and multimedia artworks that illustrate the intersection of art and life in African societies. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 322 - Medieval Art & Architecture (3 credits)


    (=HIST 322 ) A survey of the cultural and artistic trends from c. 300 to 1300, this course will focus on France, England, Germany, and Italy, but also examine important post-classical innovations in what are now Norway, Greece, Turkey, Israel, Egypt, and Syria. Much of the discussion will concern religious architecture, culminating in High Gothic cathedrals. Decorative arts such as illuminated manuscripts, mosaics, stained glass, and sculpture in wood, stone, bronze, and gold will also be central to the course content.
  
  •  

    ARTH 323 - Italian Renaissance Art & Architecture (3 credits)


    (=HIST 323 ) This course surveys the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Italian peninsula c. 1300 - 1550 and the revival of classical ideals and philosophies of visual representation focusing primarily on Florence, Venice, and Rome. The course examines the art and ideas of inspired, creative minds such as Giotto, Masaccio, Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Palladio, and many more.
  
  •  

    ARTH 324 - Baroque Art & Architecture (3 credits)


    The 17th Century was a period of remarkable exploration, experimentation, and change. Those events were embodied in the painting, sculpture, and architecture. Focusing on the Netherlands and Flanders (modern Holland and Belgium), Rome, France, and Spain, this course surveys the visionary ideas of Caravaggio, Carracci, Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Velasquez, Borromini, and Bernini among others.
  
  •  

    ARTH 326 - Northern Renaissance Art (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTH 105  and ARTH 106 , or permission of the instructor) This course is an art historical survey of Northern European Renaissance art from c. 1350-1550, including art from the Low Countries, France, Germany, and Spain. Content introduces students to the works of major cultural trends and artists, primarily in painting and sculpture. S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 330 - Rococo to Romanticism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: sophomore standing or 30+ credits) This course explores European art from 1700 to the 1840s. Major artistic trends and artists from the Rococo, Enlightenment, Neoclassical, and Romantic periods will be covered. S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 341 - Modern Art 1840-1940 (3 credits)


    This course follows the development of a modern consciousness within the art of Europe and the United States from 1840 to 1940. The progressive advance of stylistic movements during a time of industrial change and colonial expansion includes realism, impressionism, post-impressionism, expressionism, cubism, dada, surrealism, and others. The impact of non-European traditions on the growth of a modern aesthetic will be explored. S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 342 - Post-Modern and Contemporary Art - 1940 to the Present (3 credits)


    Study of the major trends in art and visual practices within the United States and Europe, since 1940 to the present, in order to understand how artists engage a personal vision, political point of view, or intellectual goal in their interaction with the world.
  
  •  

    ARTH 345 - African American Art (3 credits)


    An overview of the African-American presence in the fine arts, popular arts, architecture and material culture produced in the United States from the time of the transatlantic slave trade to the present. Study includes both the art created by African descendent Americans as well as the representation of African-Americans by Euro-Americans.
  
  •  

    ARTH 349 - Representations of Peace and Conflict in the Arts (3 credits)


    This is an in-depth examination of the representation of peace and conflict in the arts and popular media with particular attention to works of fine art, photography, graphic arts, or film. F, odd years.
  
  •  

    ARTH 350 - Art and Ideas (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 102 , ARTH 105 , or ARTH 106 , or permission of the instructor) An introduction to aesthetics, art theory, and art criticism. Students will read and discuss a variety of philosophical and critical writings that relate to the visual arts.
  
  •  

    ARTH 360 - Gender and Ethnicity in Art (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of an ARTH 100 level course with a grade of ‘C’ or better or permission of the instructor) A critical examination of how gender and ethnicity have been represented in visual culture within the Western tradition.
  
  •  

    ARTH 366 - Chinese Art and Archaeology (3 credits)


    (=ANTH 366 ) This course surveys the art and archaeology of early China focusing on major finds dating from the Neolithic through the Han dynasty. It also looks at how art historians and archaeologists use visual and material culture to reconstruct different aspects of early Chinese society and major issues relating to the practice of archaeology in China. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ARTH 380 - Twentieth Century Chinese Visual Culture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTH 250  or ARTH 266  or permission of the instructor) This course focuses on different aspects of Chinese visual culture including painting, sculpture, woodblock prints, calligraphy, advertising, graphic design, and film and how they relate to Chinese social and political developments from the late 19th century to the present. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 392 - Critiquing the Museum (3 credits)


    This course involves travel to museums and galleries in order to broaden our understanding about how viewers perceive and interact with art in various settings. We will consider how our responses are influenced by the manner of display, and the environment within which an exhibition is mounted. Travel destinations have included New York, Oxford, London, Rome, Florence, Athens and Paris, and may vary each time the course is offered.
  
  •  

    ARTH 410 - Art Crime (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTH 250  or POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This seminar explores major current and historic issues dealing with art and crime. Course contextualizes the cultural and, at times commoditized, value of art as a foundation to discuss various art crimes and their motivations. The course includes case studies of thefts and recoveries of artworks, fakes and forgeries, vandalism, art and war, and the transnational implications and complexities of art crime in the world today. F, S, M.
  
  •  

    ARTH 425 - Art and the City (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of ARTH 105  and ARTH 106 , or permission of the instructor) Explores a single city and its architectural and artistic developments from its origins to the present. The course considers cultural and artistic influences and advancements from the perspective of location and geography rather than exclusively chronological conditions. The city to be explored will vary from semester to semester. Course is repeatable up to 3 credit hours only when the focus is on a different city. F, S
  
  •  

    ARTH 440 Q - Pre-Professional Studio (3 credits)


    (=ARTS 440  or ARTD 440 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) A pre-professional studio course that will provide various art-related service to small businesses, non-profit organizations, and departments throughout the University. Students will gain first hand, real-world experiences through client driven projects that may include graphic design, photography, and curatorial services. Participants will also learn how to maintain client relationships, time management, design and development, implementation and final production. This course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 450 Q - Digital Heritage: Historical Digital Reconstruction (3 credits)


    (=GEOG 450 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) This course leverages digital technologies as tools for studying, visualizing, and contextualizing various aspects of material culture, including sculpture, architecture, and ritual objects. Central to this course is critical engagement with digital tools as used in the fields of art history, archaeology, public history, and virtual heritage. Focused on a semester-long historical case study, this course is predominantly hands-on, providing an opportunity for students to develop and utilize interdisciplinary and transferrable skills, including 3D modeling, mapping, digital photography, photogrammetry, and graphic and web design. To that end, students will conduct focused research on an object, monument, or site in order to produce a fully documented essay. This essay will form the scholarly basis for a digital project that may employ any appropriate technologies, including Photoshop, SketchUp, GIS, Omeka/ Neatline, Dreamweaver, and Tourweaver. The course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ARTH 452 Q - Digital Heritage: Virtual Landscapes (3 credits)


    (=GEOG 452 ) This course introduces students to a variety of digital technologies that can be used to recreate and represent historical and contemporary landscapes, as well as to present historical content and scholarly documentation within virtual landscape platforms. The critical visualization of landscapes is a practice of growing importance in the fields of digital and public history, archaeology, art and architectural history, cultural geography, and digital heritage. Students need no prior technical expertise to complete this course. Students learn how to build interactive 3D models using digital authoring software, and how to generate virtual landscape features and platforms in various software packages. Students also work collaboratively to develop multimedia scholarly content that documents the changing landscapes of a particular place. For the final project, individual 3D models and multimedia content are embedded within an immersive and interactive virtual landscape. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ARTH 497 - Art History Senior Capstone (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTH 250  and senior status) The Senior Capstone in Art History exposes students to the most pervasive and important varieties of art historical interpretation and the methodologies employed by art historians through the centuries. A research thesis is required. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTH 499 - Special Topics in Visual Culture (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTH 105 , ARTH 106 , or permission of the instructor) Topics in visual culture of special interests but which are too specific to be served by an established course. Topics may include but are not limited to more diverse imagery than traditionally offered in an art history survey course. May be taken more than once as the topic changes. Course fulfills upper level course requirement for ARTS majors.

Art Studio

  
  •  

    ARTS 102 - Visual Arts and Culture (3 credits)


    An introductory course in visual language and literacy. The course will include a brief history and overview of art and design and will also examine the cultural, political and social aspects of art.
  
  •  

    ARTS 103 - Fundamentals of Art I (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of Art I is a comprehensive overview of the elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Students in this course will be challenged to solve complex, creative problems through the utilization of the gestalt principles and color while experimenting with a variety of materials relevant to the process. The relationship between composition and craftsmanship will be emphasized while exploring the place of art within a contemporary environment. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 104 - Fundamentals of Art II (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of Art II is a comprehensive overview of the elements and principles of three-dimensional design. Students will address various construction techniques, be challenged to solve complex creative problems, as well as develop their ideas from initial sketch to execution. Students will also be challenged to think conceptually exploring form, content, and meaning in their works. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 105 - Fundamentals of Art III (3 credits)


    Basic introduction to the use of the computer as a creative medium for art and design. Addresses basic skills and concepts relevant to contemporary theories and practices. Provides a hands-on introduction to fundamentals of typography, page layout, image acquisition and manipulation and time based media. Technical knowledge is applied to problems from both individual and group assigned projects. F, S, M, Su.
  
  •  

    ARTS 111 - Fundamentals of Drawing (3 credits)


    Fundamentals of Drawing I will introduce the student to the basic materials and methodologies of drawing. The course will focus on developing students’ observational skills through multiple techniques, linear sighting strategies, various media, and a rigorous studio practice. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 112 - Fundamentals of Drawing II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ARTS 111 ) Fundamentals of Drawing II builds upon the methodologies of Fundamentals of Drawing I and expands the students’ repertoire into more contemporary drawing practices. Students will explore complex spatial exercises through the use of various mediums and the use of color. Conceptual development through a rigorous studio practice will be emphasized. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 200 - Introduction to Printmaking (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 112 , or permission of the instructor) An introduction to a broad range of fine art printmaking methods, materials, and vocabulary, including monotype, collagraph, photo-polymer intaglio, linocut, and embossing. Dry and wet paper printing methods are covered using relief, intaglio, and planographic processes. Students will use oil or water soluble printing inks as prescribed by the process. Emphasis will be placed on design, technique, and individual creative expression. Studio experiences are supported by readings and presentations to provide a historical and contemporary context for the mediums. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 204 - Ceramics (Pottery/Sculpture) (3 credits)


    An introductory course to explore ceramic processes involved with pottery and sculpture. Concentration is on hand building techniques of pinch, coil, and slab construction. Experiences will include decorating techniques, several glaze technologies and kiln loading and firing. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 207 - Silkscreen Printmaking (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 112 , or permission of the instructor) Introduction to the silkscreen printmaking processes. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 208 - Sculpture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 104  or permission of the instructor) This course introduces the materials and techniques of sculpture, including plaster modeling, cold casting, carving, and assembling.
  
  •  

    ARTS 209 - Introduction to Monotype (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 112 , or permission of the instructor) An introduction to fine art monotype and monoprinting techniques. This is a basic level printmaking course that will serve students interested in printmaking, drawing, and painting. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 211 - Painting with Water Media (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 111 , ARTS 112 , or permission of the instructor) Introduction to the concepts and materials of water-based painting. Included will be dry and wet paper techniques, resists, various supports and grounds; traditional and contemporary usages.
  
  •  

    ARTS 212 - Painting with Opaque Media (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 111 , ARTS 112  or permission of the instructor) Introduction to the concepts and materials of painting with an opaque medium (oil or acrylic at instructor’s discretion). Included will be alla prima, wet on wet, underpainting, glazing, palette knife techniques, various supports and grounds; traditional and contemporary usages.
  
  •  

    ARTS 214 - Book Arts (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 104 , or permission of the instructor) An introduction to various traditional bookmaking techniques within the context of the development of book structures and exploration of contemporary book arts concepts. F.
  
  •  

    ARTS 231 - Life Drawing I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 111  and ARTS 112 ) An introduction to drawing the figure from life, with an emphasis on visual perception and basic drawing skills.
  
  •  

    ARTS 232 - Life Drawing II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 231  or permission of the instructor) An introduction to drawing the figure from life, with an emphasis on visual perception and basic drawing skills.
  
  •  

    ARTS 261 - Introduction to Black and White Photography (3 credits)


    An introduction to the use of the camera, light as a creative tool, darkroom practices, film developing, and printing. Emphasis on photography as a creative medium for personal expression.
  
  •  

    ARTS 281 - Jewelry and Metalsmithing I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 208 ) This course is an introduction to metal as a material for both adornment and sculpture. In this class students will be introduced to cold connections, soldering, and forging techniques. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 297 - Sophomore Review (0 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103 , ARTS 104 , ARTS 105 , ARTS 111  and ARTS 112 ) (Coreq: ARTS 298 *) This course is designed as a diagnostic and advisory review of the student’s work at the end of the sophomore year, conducted in conference with an art faculty committee. Sophomore Review is a portfolio review process that takes place during the sophomore year of an art studio/graphic designer major’s program. This course must be taken concurrently with ARTS 298 . (*ARTS 112  can be taken concurrently with special permission by the instructor.) F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 298 - Concepts in the Artistic Process (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103 , ARTS 104 , ARTS 105 , ARTS 111 , and ARTS 112 ) (Coreq: ARTS 297 *) This course is an introduction to conceptual art-making through the evaluation of the collaborative art process, analysis of visual culture, and the preparation of life as a creative professional. Students of this course will be expected to create conceptually driven collaborative works, learn and incorporate advanced critiquing skills, and create a professional identity. This course must be taken concurrently with ARTS 297 . (*ARTS 112  can be taken concurrently with special permission by the instructor.) F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 311 - Intermediate Painting I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 211  or ARTS 212 ) Further explorations of materials and techniques of painting with emphasis on individual creative expression.
  
  •  

    ARTS 312 - Intermediate Painting II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 211  or ARTS 212 ) Further explorations of materials and techniques of painting with emphasis on individual creative expression.
  
  •  

    ARTS 313 - Painting the Portrait (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 211  or ARTS 212  with a grade of ‘C’ or better or permission of the instructor) Painting the Portrait is an intermediate level painting course. Portrait painting is a genre that expresses essence in the physical, psychological and spiritual aspects of the sitter. The challenge is to express the portrait in the language of the 21st century making it relevant to contemporary art and life. Paint media selection for this course will be an individual choice. Knowledge of the chosen paint medium is essential for successful portrait results. Technical and skill development will include anatomical studies, proportions of the face and figure, color studies, observations of skull and plaster casts and compositional strategies through direct observation of the model. F.
  
  •  

    ARTS 318 - Advanced Color Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 297 ) An advanced course in the principles of color theory and color usage. F.
  
  •  

    ARTS 321 - The Functional Vessel (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 204  or permission of the instructor) This ceramic course concentrates upon wheel throwing techniques to include basic forms, lidded vessels and composite vessels of a functional purpose, including the teapot.
  
  •  

    ARTS 322 - The Sculptural Vessel (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 204  or permission of the instructor) This ceramic course combines wheel throwing and hand building processes in pursuit of a sculptural approach to the vessel tradition. Presentations and readings on contemporary developments within the ceramic vessel tradition will be explored. Review and refinement of wheel throwing and hand building skills are incorporated to extend the student’s range of options in pursuit of a personal vocabulary of the sculptural vessel.
  
  •  

    ARTS 331 - Advanced Drawing I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 231  and ARTS 232 ) Advanced methods of graphic representation and expression. Emphasis is on traditional and non-traditional methods and developing individual creative expression.
  
  •  

    ARTS 332 - Advanced Drawing II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 231  and ARTS 232 ) Advanced methods of graphic representation and expression. Emphasis is on traditional and non-traditional methods and developing individual creative expression.
  
  •  

    ARTS 336 - Mixed Media (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 111 ) An advanced course in the principles and use of mixed media in art and design. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 361 - Intermediate Black and White Photography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 261 ) An intermediate course continuing the investigation into photographic techniques. Panning, zooming, multiple exposure, and the creative use of different developers, films, and papers will be stressed as well as darkroom manipulation of the image.
  
  •  

    ARTS 362 - Digital Photographic Techniques (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 261  and ARTS 361 ) The students taking this class should have a firm understanding of the photographic medium. This is an introductory course to color photography in a digital photographic environment. Through the use of Adobe Photoshop, archival printing, and their own personal digital camera, the students of this class will learn to treat the computer as if it were a darkroom both creatively and technically. Students should come into this class already having an understanding of camera basics and photography as a medium.
  
  •  

    ARTS 363 - Experimental Photography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 261  and ARTS 361 ) Students who take this course should have a firm understanding of the photographic medium. Advanced photography course that emphasizes the experimental nature that photography possesses. Students will work with non-traditional materials, alternative photographic technique, as well as experiment with various types of films and papers. Experimental Photography is about learning the limits of your photographic materials and thinking outside the typical photographic frame.
  
  •  

    ARTS 370 - Relief Printmaking (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 112 , or permission of the instructor) This course combines review and refinement of existing cutting and printing processes leading to the extension of skill acquisitions. Single block and multiple block print editions will be produced in black and white and color. Complex registration and printing methods will be covered. Emphasis will be on technique, design, and developing personal expression and meaning. Studio experiences are supported by presentations and readings to provide an historical and contemporary context for relief printmaking. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 373 - Photopolymer Intaglio Printmaking (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTS 112 , or permission of the instructor) An introduction to non-toxic photopolymer printmaking processes. This course offers the student the opportunity to investigate a process that creates an original matrix from which multiples can be made. Photopolymer intaglio enables the artist to make prints that have qualities of both traditional intaglio and lithography, without exposure to toxic chemicals. The process is relatively direct and prints are achieved much faster than though traditional printmaking methods. Students will use both two-dimensional design and drawing skills to expand their drawing and design abilities and conceptual thinking. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 374 - Digital Photographic Techniques II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 362 ) Students should have a firm understanding of both digital and color photography. This is a continuation course in digital color photography. ARTS 374 will focus on the development of the photographer’s creative eye by examining contemporary color photography and completing more complex digital photographic exercises.
  
  •  

    ARTS 380 - Fine Arts Workshop: Brookgreen Gardens (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 104  and permission of the instructor) Off-campus hands-on workshop to be taken at Brookgreen Gardens. Workshops are typically one week in length. Subjects vary by workshop offerings. Majority of studio instruction will take place at Brookgreen Garden’s Sculpture Facility under the tutelage of a qualified professional artist. Participation in specific workshop to be pre-approved by Art Department Faculty for credit. Additional requirements for credit include reflection and research papers. Su.
  
  •  

    ARTS 381 - Jewelry and Metalsmithing II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 281 ) Investigates metal’s ductility and plasticity. In the class students will be introduced to raising, fold forming, and hammer forming techniques. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 382 - Objective Sculpture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 208  or permission of the instructor) This course investigates sculpture as object making. Students experiment with a wide range of scale, format, materials, and media options, with emphasis on the creation of meaning in personal objects. Presentations and readings provide historical and contemporary context for a better understanding of sculpture as object.
  
  •  

    ARTS 383 - Multiples, Molding and Casting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 208 ) This course will investigate multiplicity, both in terms of quantity and variety. Students will experiment with scale, format, materials and media options, with an emphasis on the creation of multiples. Investigations involving mold-making and casting will play a significant role in this course. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 385 - Fine Arts Workshop (1 to 3 credits)


    (Art Center) (Prereq: ARTS 103 , ARTS 104 , and permission of the instructor) (Restricted to ART majors and minors) Off-campus workshop at pre-approved art or craft facility. Workshops are typically one to two weeks in length. Subjects vary by workshop offerings. Majority of studio instruction will take place at workshop facility (off-campus) under the tutelage of qualified professional artist. Additional requirements for credit include reflection and research papers. Su.
  
  •  

    ARTS 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations section in this catalog. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
  •  

    ARTS 408 - Studio Lighting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 362 ) An intensive studio course in photographic lighting techniques. Through demonstrations and lectures will learn how to use artificial lighting within the context of commercial and artistic application. The course will include, but is not limited to, techniques in location lighting, portrait, still life, editorial, and fine art photography. This course emphasizes creative visual communication through commercial and technical application. F.
  
  •  

    ARTS 411 - Advanced Painting I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 312 ) Upper level courses for students with substantial backgrounds in painting. The choice of medium will be left to the student. Emphasis is on design, developing personal expression and style.
  
  •  

    ARTS 412 - Advanced Painting II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 312 ) Upper level courses for students with substantial backgrounds in painting. The choice of medium will be left to the student. Emphasis is on design, developing personal expression and style.
  
  •  

    ARTS 421 - Objective Approaches in Ceramics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 204  or permission of the instructor) This course combines review and refinement of existing wheel and hand building processes leading to the extension of skill acquisitions. The focus is on personal design and construction of the clay object, whether functional and/or sculptural in purpose. Issues with the craft/fine art debate are addressed by presentations and reading to provide historical and contemporary context for students to explore design and meaning for the clay object today. Further glaze and surface resolutions are explored and mixed media options are addressed.
  
  •  

    ARTS 422 - Narratives in Clay (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 204  or permission of the instructor) This course focuses primarily on combining various sculptural processes with the intent to examine a variety of strategies for developing personal narratives in clay. Studio experiences are supported by readings on and analysis of rapidly developing trends in contemporary ceramic sculpture to discern creative strategies, historical appropriations and cross cultural influences available to the ceramic artist today. Student work may range from tile, relief to sectional sculptures and may include mixed media solutions as a further means to extend sculptural options.
  
  •  

    ARTS 424 - Photographic Theory and Practice (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 362 ) Students will study historic and contemporary critical photographic theory and its relationship to current artistic practices in the photographic medium. The coursework will be supported by the exploration of contemporary photographic practices such as methods of production, presentation, new possibilities within the “tradition of exhibition,” and the development of an individual body of work. S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 425 - Ceramic Sculptural Forms (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 204 ; ARTS 322  or permission of the instructor) This course combines review and refinement of existing wheel and/or hand building processes leading to the extension of ceramic skill acquisitions. The focus is on personal design and construction of the sculptural clay object. Issues first addressed in the survey of postmodern ceramic trends are reviewed, and students will select a specific trend to expand upon. Further glaze and surface resolutions are explored and mixed media options are addressed. F, even years.
  
  •  

    ARTS 426 - Functional Forms (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 204 ; ARTS 321  or ARTS 322 ) This ceramics course is intended to expand on the student’s abilities to design and construct functionally based ceramic forms. Emphasis is on individual creative expression and craftsmanship in relationship to the potter’s wheel and/or hand-built functional forms. S, even years.
  
  •  

    ARTS 440 Q - Pre-Professional Studio (3 to 6 credits)


    (=ARTH 440  or ARTD 440 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) A pre-professional studio course that will provide various art-related service to small businesses, non-profit organizations, and departments throughout the University. Students will gain first hand, real-world experiences through client driven projects that may include graphic design, photography, and curatorial services. Participants will also learn how to maintain client relationships, time management, design and development, implementation and final production. This course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 471 - Advanced Printmaking I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 200  or ARTS 207  or ARTS 209  or ARTS 370  or ARTS 373 ) Advanced work on an individual basis in one or more printmaking media. Emphasis placed on experimentation and development of personal imagery and direction.
  
  •  

    ARTS 472 - Advanced Printmaking II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 471 ) Advanced work on an individual basis in one or more printmaking mediums building upon work and concepts from ARTS 471. Emphasis is placed on experimentation and development of personal imagery and direction. Students work towards building a body of mature work in printmaking.
  
  •  

    ARTS 481 - Experimental Sculpture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 208  or permission of the instructor) This course explores the theory and practice of sculptural site activation. Students will work in the extended mediums of site, space, light, sound, motion, and time-based technologies that may include digital imaging and video, investigating sculpture as active experience. An installation space will be available for student use and cooperative interaction will be encouraged.
  
  •  

    ARTS 482 - Advanced Sculptural Processes (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 380 , ARTS 381 , ARTS 382 , ARTS 385 , or ARTS 487 ; or permission of the instructor) This course encourages sculptural exploration by allowing students to work with media and content of their choice, and encourages the exploring of some material new to them. Emphasis will be placed on the mastery of techniques that are integral to developing and understanding personal sculptural expression. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 487 - Concepts in Sculpture (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 208  or permission of the instructor) This course will explore concepts utilizes in the contemporary sculpture, such as movement, installation, scale, function and material. Each concept will be explored through exercises, with the intent to better understand how they can be useful in self-expression. Additionally, investigation into how contemporary artists utilize these techniques will give context to the work being done in class. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 491 - Jewelry and Metalsmithing III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 381 ) An in-depth investigation of conceptual art making through the use of Metalsmithing processes. In addition, students will learn advanced metal fabrication techniques. F, S.
  
  •  

    ARTS 495 - Art Studio Internship I (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103 , ARTS 104 , ARTS 111 , ARTS 112 , ARTH 105 , ARTH 106 , plus junior standing, and 2.0 GPA or better. Students must have permission of the department chair before applying for internship) Application for the internship can be obtained without first receiving permission from the chair of the department. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course objective, course requirements and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties: the student faculty supervisor, chair of the department and the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal and when possible build a portfolio. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization during the semester by the coordinator of internships.
  
  •  

    ARTS 496 - Art Studio Internship II (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 495 ) Application must be obtained from the chair of the department before applying. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course objective, course requirements and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties: the student faculty supervisor, chair of the department and the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal and when possible build a portfolio. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization during the semester by the coordinator of internships. This internship opportunity is open only to students who have already taken ARTS 495 .
  
  •  

    ARTS 497 Q - The Artist as a Professional (3 credits)


    (Prereq: second semester Senior majoring in studio art or permission of adviser) (Computer Usage) The range of topics covered in this course includes the development of an Artist statement, a biographic statement, resume writing, and portfolio development culminating in a Senior thesis show and professional presentation. Instruction will be given on how to prepare work for presentation orally, as well as in digital format. Students will use the computer extensively in preparing a CD on which they place their entire portfolio (artist statement, bio, resume and digital images). They will also learn how to format their art images for insertion onto the Visual Arts website.
  
  •  

    ARTS 499 Q* - Special Topics in Art (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) In-depth investigation of specific topics and media not generally available in the curriculum. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.

Astronomy

  
  •  

    ASTR 101 - Conceptual Astronomy (3 credits)


    (Coreq: ASTR 101L ) An introduction to contemporary astronomy that explores our current understanding of the Cosmos and the unique methods employed to study astronomical objects. Topics include history of astronomy, observed motions of celestial objects, the solar system, stellar evolution, galaxies, and cosmology. The course material is designed primarily, but not exclusively, for non-science majors. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ASTR 101L - Conceptual Astronomy Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: ASTR 101 ) Using laboratory equipment and exercises, students will investigate subtopics in astronomy. The labs will be a combination of indoor activities and the occasional nighttime sky viewing. While there is not a formal mathematical prerequisite, competency in high school algebra and geometry is expected. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ASTR 111 - Descriptive Astronomy I (3 credits)


    An introduction to basic astronomical principles and their historical development, with emphasis on some of the major objects in the solar system. A description of physical processes, and the methods used by astronomers, will be presented. A combination of three hours of lecture and demonstration designed primarily, but not exclusively, for non-science majors. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    ASTR 111L - Descriptive Astronomy I Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: ASTR 111  or permission of the instructor). A series of laboratory experiments and exercises (in and outdoors) to accompany ASTR 111 . Students will have the opportunity to do some night sky viewing (naked eye as well as telescope viewing). A sample of exercises: Phases of the Moon, the sky in Autumn, comparative planetology, rotation of the rings of Saturn, etc. No college mathematic prerequisite, but competency in high school algebra and geometry is expected. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    ASTR 112 - Descriptive Astronomy II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ASTR 111 ) An introduction to basic astronomical principles and their development, with emphasis on stars and stellar systems; stellar evolution; interstellar matter, dust, and nebulae; galaxies; cosmology and cosmogony; and life in the universe. A combination of three hours of lecture and demonstration designed primarily, but not exclusively, for non-science majors. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    ASTR 112L - Descriptive Astronomy II Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: ASTR 112  or permission of the instructor). A series of laboratory experiments and exercises (in and outdoors) to accompany Astronomy 112. Students will have the opportunity to do some night sky viewing (naked eye as well as telescope viewing). A sample of exercises: Spectral classification, the Spring sky, distance to stars, the Andromeda galaxy, the rate of expansion of our Universe, etc. No college mathematic prerequisite, but competency in high school algebra and geometry is expected. Offered as needed.

Bioinformatics

  
  •  

    BINF 101 - Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: MATH 130 ) (Coreq: BINF 101L ) An introduction to bioinformatics, the use of computational techniques to extract and analyze information from genomic and biological databases. F, S.
  
  •  

    BINF 101L - Introduction to Bioinformatics Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Prereq: MATH 130 ) (Coreq: BINF 101 ) The laboratory involves the use of computerized bioinformatics methodologies for the extraction and analysis of genomic and biological information. F, S.

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 101 - The Science of Life - Biology for Non-Science Majors (3 credits)


    (Coreq: BIOL 101L ) A non-technical introduction to biology for non-science majors. This course will introduce students to basic biological processes and relate them to everyday life. F, S.
  
  •  

    BIOL 101L - The Science of Life - Laboratory for Non-Science Majors (1 credit)


    (Coreq: BIOL 101 ) A non-technical introduction to Biology for non-science majors. This course will introduce students to basic biological processes using a series of hands-on laboratory exercises. F, S.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 22