Dec 05, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HIST 255 Q* - Great Debates (3 credits)


    This course explores the elements of historical thinking, analysis, and argumentation. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 289 Q* - Exploring Careers in History (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to various fields of historical work and potential career opportunities in history through a possible combination of readings, discussions, field trips, invited speakers and hands-on projects. It assists students in understanding the job market, including beneficial internships, and trains students in the skills necessary to navigate that job market. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 300 - Historical Methods (3 credits)


    A seminar in the principles and practice of historical research, including an introduction to historiography, the interpretation of historical documents, proper documentation, and clarity of expression. Should be among the first upper-level courses taken by majors.
  
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    HIST 302 - The Middle Ages (500-1250) (3 credits)


    A study of the causes and course of the split of the Roman world into Western European, Eastern Orthodox and Islamic culture, followed by a discussion of the civilization of the High Middle Ages and the problems of cultural change in the late medieval period.
  
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    HIST 307 - European History (1848-1914) (3 credits)


    A study of the main currents of European thought, from the Revolutions of 1848 to the rise of industrial power, imperialism, diplomatic realignment, nationalism, and the road to World War I.
  
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    HIST 308 - Interwar Europe (3 credits)


    An inquiry into major developments in European history, society, and culture between 1914 and 1939. F, S.
  
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    HIST 309 - World War II and the Cold War (3 credits)


    An inquiry into the conduct of the Second World War and the problems of planning and implementing the peace; origins and the development of the Cold War; the demise of colonialism and the integration of Europe; the rise of the superpowers.
  
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    HIST 310 - History of Berlin: Landscape and Memory (3 credits)


    This course examines both the dynamic transformation of Berlin’s growth and the historical memories embedded in its urban landscapes. We may focus as well on how civic and national officials have worked to preserve the past in the city as a way for Germans to work through the legacies of the modern era.
  
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    HIST 312 - Patterns in World History (3 credits)


    This course examines how people, political regimes and mobile capital created the modern world. Students will study the interactions between Europeans, Asians, Africans, Pacific Islanders and Americans from early-modern oceanic voyages through the ages of revolution, modernization, nationalism, and decolonization.
  
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    HIST 314 - The History of Modern Russia and the Soviet Union Since 1855 (3 credits)


    The decline of Imperial Russia, the Revolution of 1917, and the development of the Soviet Union.
  
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    HIST 322 - Medieval Art & Architecture (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 322 ) A survey of the cultural and artistic trends from c. 300 to 1300, this course will focus on France, England, Germany, and Italy, but also examine important post-classical innovations in what are now Norway, Greece, Turkey, Israel, Egypt, and Syria. Much of the discussion will concern religious architecture, culminating in High Gothic cathedrals. Decorative arts such as illuminated manuscripts, mosaics, stained glass, and sculpture in wood, stone, bronze, and gold will also be central to the course content.
  
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    HIST 323 - Italian Renaissance Art & Architecture (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 323 ) This course surveys the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Italian peninsula c. 1300-1550 and the revival of classical ideals and philosophies of visual representation focusing primarily on Florence, Venice, and Rome. The course examines the art and ideas of inspired, creative minds such as Giotto, Masaccio, Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Palladio, and many more.
  
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    HIST 326 - History of Germany Since 1870 (3 credits)


    A critical study of the creation of the German Empire, Bismarck, Wilhelmian Germany, the First World War, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the Second World War, and the fate of German speaking peoples since then.
  
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    HIST 328 - Renaissance Europe, 1250-1517 (3 credits)


    A survey of Renaissance culture as it emerged in the northern Italian city-states. Topics include republican and despotic governments, war and diplomacy, humanism, art, individualism, religion, the growth of secularism, gender, the family, and the Northern Renaissance.
  
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    HIST 329 - Reformation Europe, 1517-1648 (3 credits)


    An examination of the Protestant Reformation and its European context. Topics include the Renaissance background, Luther’s break with Rome, the major reformed traditions, the Catholic response, the nation-state, warfare and diplomacy, colonialism, the new science, and the rise of toleration and individualism.
  
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    HIST 330 - Enlightenment: Europe (1648-1789) (3 credits)


    A survey of the main currents of European thought, cultural development, and politics between the Thirty Years’ War and the French Revolution.
  
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    HIST 331 Q* - Medieval Islamic World, c. 600-1258 (3 credits)


    This course explores the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural aspects surrounding the rise of the Islamic Empire through the reign of the Abbasid Caliphate, situating the early Islamic traditions within their proper historical contexts, including the political, economic, and social structures ranging from central Asia to modern day Spain from c. 600 to 1250 CE. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 332 Q* - Age of Alexander and The Roman Republic (3 credits)


    This course may examine the political, social, religious, economic, intellectual, and military developments of the Hellenistic Mediterranean, c. 350-30 BCE. Topics of focus will include the Classical Greek legacy, the conquests of Alexander the Great, the spread of Greek civilization throughout the Mediterranean, and the development of the Roman Republic through the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE.
  
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    HIST 333 - Modern France: 1715 to the Present (3 credits)


    A political and social history of the French nation from the end of Louis XIV’s reign, and the Revolutions of 1789 and 1792, to modern-day France.
  
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    HIST 334 - Paris as Text and Context (3 credits)


    This course examines themes and topics concerning the history of Paris from 1600 to the present.
  
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    HIST 335 - History of England: 1485-1714 (3 credits)


    The development of Modern England from the beginning of the Tudor dynasty, through the Elizabethan period, the Civil War, Cromwell, to the end of the Stuart line.
  
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    HIST 336 - Ancien Regime and French Revolution (3 credits)


    This course provides an overview of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of France from the late seventeenth century through the French Revolution
  
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    HIST 338 - War and Memory (3 credits)


    An interdisciplinary examination of the individual, collective, and institutional struggles associated with the history, trauma, memory, and legacy of war. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics no more than four times. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 339 - The Great War (3 credits)


    An interdisciplinary examination of the conflicts of 1914-1918, which may emphasize private memoirs, combat narratives, professional histories, public forms of remembrance, and representations of violence. F, S.
  
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    HIST 340 - Topics in East Asian History (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to selected subjects in East Asian History. Topics may include the early Chinese imperium; feudal rule; commercial and social conditions; arrival of Western imperialists; and the rise of anti-imperialist, nationalist, and de-colonization movements. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. Offered as needed.
  
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    HIST 341 Q* - History of Modern Korea (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to the major, political, social, intellectual, and economic developments in Korean history from the 18th Century to the present. Of primary interest will be the transformation of traditional Korea into a Japanese colony and eventually a divided nation. F, S.
  
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    HIST 344 - Conflict and Society (3 credits)


    This course examines significant conflicts in historical context by addressing the social and cultural effects of conflict upon the societies that experience them as well as the ways that societies and cultures shape the conflicts they wage. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 345 - Intellectual History of Early Modern Europe (3 credits)


    “Great books” from the High Middle Ages to the Romantic era, set within the broader social, economic, and political context. Topics include scholasticism, humanism, Renaissance Platonism, Reformation and Counter-Reformation theology, skepticism, the new science, British empiricism, the Enlightenment, and the Romantic reaction.
  
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    HIST 347 - Pre-modern Japan: The Rise and Fall of the Samurai (3 credits)


    An introductory survey of the society and culture of pre-modern Japan, this course examines the formation of the early Japanese imperial state, the disposition of Japan’s feudal rule by military elite, and the commercial and social conditions that characterized the early modern era in Japan. Particular attention is directed to the transformation of the samurai from proud and able warriors into what was by the nineteenth century in all practice little more than a class of inflexible bureaucrats and raucous brigands.
  
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    HIST 348 Q* - Modern Japan: From the Last Samurai to the Pacific War (3 credits)


    Together students and instructor consider the ideas, principles, and values that underpinned Japan’s traditional culture and society even as Japan’s selective absorption of Western paradigms and cultural forms is studied. Students learn to build for themselves a better understanding of the role values-traditional and modern, Japanese and non-Japanese-played in the historical process of national integration and rapid industrialization that marked Japan’s emergence as a twentieth century power. F, S.
  
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    HIST 349 - Modern China: Reform and Revolution in the Modern Age (3 credits)


    A survey of Modern China from the rise of the Qing Dynasty in 1644 to the economic boom of the post-Deng 1990’s. Students examine China’s experience of Western incursions since the 1830’s, through the course gives primacy to the impact of domestic-born institutional and cultural innovations that presaged the arrival of the Western Powers. An investigation of China’s inner-history of reform and revolution enables students to appreciate the way in which Modern China was as much the product of domestic processes as it was the result of changes wrought by the West.
  
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    HIST 350 - Vietnam: The American Experience, 1941-1982 (3 credits)


    The French colonial experience in Vietnam, the development of Vietnamese nationalism, the rise to power of Ho Chi minh; the deepening American commitment, the anguish of the American experience, the collapse of a peace that never was, the end of the American backed regime of Nguyen Van Thieu in 1975, and the aftermath of the War in the United States.
  
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    HIST 351 - The Ottoman Empire, 1281-1923 (3 credits)


    This course will explore the major events and themes of the Ottoman Empire from the late 13th to the early 20th century. It will look at the empire’s origins, expansion, stagnation, decline, reformation attempts, World War I, the War of Independence and the creation of the Turkish Republic, and, finally, the Ottoman legacy in the Balkans and the Middle East. F, S.
  
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    HIST 352 - Topics in the Modern Middle East (3 credits)


    This course will focus on a variety of selected topics in 19th and 20th century Middle Eastern history. It may explore a number of themes related to the late Ottoman Empire, the Arab World, the Eastern Mediterranean, the Caucasus, Iran, Israel, Turkey and US-Middle Eastern relations. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 353 - The History of India (3 credits)


    An examination of the historical development of India from the time of the Mughal Empire, including the period of British dominion culminating with independence in 1947, and democratic India under the Nehru dynasty from independence to the present.
  
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    HIST 354 - The Modern Middle East since 1918 (3 credits)


    This course provides a survey of the social, economic and political history of the Middle East from the end of World War I to the Arab Spring and its aftermath. The impact of developments from the Ottoman reform period, the European colonial era and the years of political independence may be examined. The course may also explore a number of topics such as the Arab-Israeli conflict, the rise of nationalism, the role of oil, the resurgence of political Islam, direct American intervention in the region and the events of the “Arab Spring”. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 355 - Latin American Culture and Civilization (3 credits)


    A broad-based historical study of cultures and civilizations across the diverse geographic and socio-economic regions of Latin America. Students will examine how geography, religion, social movements, and cultural heritage shape the histories of the region. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    HIST 356 - History of Latin American Foreign Relations (3 credits)


    (=POLI 489 ) A study of major issues such as foreign intervention, globalization, debt crises, and political violence facing states and societies in recent Latin American history. Students will explore connections between the people and governments of Latin America, Europe, and the US since the 19th century, focusing on the development of US dominance in Latin America in the 20th century and its effects. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 357 - Exploring Middle Eastern Conflict (3 credits)


    This course examines the history of Middle Eastern conflict between the late 19th century and the present. It may consider such topics as nationalism, ethnic nationalism, population exchanges/refugees, ethnic conflict, colonialism, post-colonialism, civil war, war, the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and terrorism. The course may require students to engage a wide-ranging selection of primary and secondary texts from different political perspectives. The course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 358 - Borderlands: The Balkans and Caucasus since 1878 (3 credits)


    This course will analyze the major events and themes of Balkan and Caucasian history during the late 19th & 20th centuries. We will cover such topics as nationalism, independence movements, terrorism, state building, population exchanges, genocide/ethnic cleansing, the Balkan Wars, the World Wars, Communism, the Cold War, the Greek-Turkish disputes, the collapse of Yugoslavia, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict and energy politics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 359 Q - History of Latin American Popular Culture (3 credits)


    This course explores the history of popular culture in Latin America and provides students with insight into the culture, practices, and institutions that create national identities in Latin America. In this course students study popular culture within the frameworks of nationalism, state-building, revolution, and empire and analyze a range of primary and secondary sources from Latin America. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 360 - The Early Republic 1783-1820 (3 credits)


    This course examines the emerging nation in the wake of the American Revolution. Topics include the Confederation period, the Constitutional Convention, the battle over ratification, and the presidencies of Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison and Monroe.
  
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    HIST 361 - Antebellum Period 1820-1850 (3 credits)


    This course examines the political, social, and economic forces that enlarged, enriched, and empowered the United States while simultaneously hastening the nation toward civil war.
  
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    HIST 362 - Becoming American (3 credits)


    This history course will take a holistic approach to the theme “Becoming American,” a process at times called “Americanization.” We may explore the ideas of American Identity, Regionalism, Immigration and Migration, the American Dream, Citizenship and the Nation, Diversity and Multiculturalism. This course introduces students to the craft and concepts involved in interdisciplinary knowledge production within the Humanities. Students may be exposed to materials used in a multitude of disciplines and will be asked to evaluate and interpret such documents as historical primary sources, memoirs, literary works, films, photographs, artifacts, music, and art. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 363 - Black Atlantic & African Diaspora (3 credits)


    In this course, students investigate the meanings of the Black Atlantic and the African Diaspora concepts generally studying the migrations of black people through the four Atlantic continents from the 17th century forward. Students explore several themes, such as: Slavery and the Laws in the Black Atlantic, Emancipation and Freedom, Transatlantic Voyagers, Black Cultural Unity, Resistance, and Citizenship. Primary sources are analyzed to investigate the continuity and change of themes over time, and to understand from a participant’s point of view. In addition, secondary sources are used for insights into the time period and for current historiography. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 364 - Readings in American History (3 credits)


    This is an undergraduate course in which students analyze primary sources and examine major secondary works to achieve greater understanding of the social, political, economic, and intellectual development of the United States. This course explores major historical trends and events and provides ample opportunity for individual research, reflection, and group discussion. Topics may vary by instructor; this course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 365 - Critical Moments in American History (3 credits)


    This course focuses on specific events that changed the course of American history. Students engage primary and secondary sources while analyzing the causes and consequences of each historical event. Reading and writing assignments will advance the notion of contingency – the argument that even minor alterations in actions or circumstances can produce different historical outcomes. Topics may vary by instructor; this course may be repeated for up to six credit hours.  F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 367 - Colonial America (3 credits)


    An examination of the history of the American colonies from their beginnings through their evolution into mature provincial societies. Emphasis is placed on the interactions among colonists, native Americans, and African slaves, as well as the development of distinctive regions.
  
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    HIST 368 - The Frontier in U.S. History (3 credits)


    A thorough examination of America’s westward expansion and the impact of a frontier on the social, political, and economic development of the United States. Included will be a study of frontier life, myths, and legends.
  
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    HIST 369 - Native American History (3 credits)


    A detailed examination of North American Indian cultures and history from early colonization to the present including Indian wars, federal Indian policy, and the contemporary ethnocentric movement.
  
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    HIST 370 - Revolutionary America (3 credits)


    Study of the American Revolution era: the social and political causes of the rebellion, the war, the turbulent decade of the 1780’s and the ratification of the Constitution. Emphasis is placed on the political debates of the period and the lives of ordinary Americans during these times.
  
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    HIST 371 - Civil War and Reconstruction (3 credits)


    Analysis of major problems of American history from the sectional conflict over slavery and secession through the war years and the reconstruction of the nation.
  
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    HIST 372 - U.S. History 1876-1917 (3 credits)


    From the end of the Reconstruction to the First World War; Industrialization, Imperialism, and Reform.
  
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    HIST 373 - U.S. History 1917-1945 (3 credits)


    Political, economic, social and cultural development during World War I, the “Roaring Twenties,” the Depression, and the Second World War.
  
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    HIST 374 - U.S. History 1945 to the Present (3 credits)


    A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States since the end of World War II, the “Cold War,” and the global confrontation between the United States and the communist world.
  
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    HIST 375 - Exploring Peace in the Middle East (3 credits)


    This course examines the history of peace efforts in the Middle East, divergent historical narratives and the role of historians in conflict transformation and historical reconciliation. The course requires students to engage a wide-ranging selection of primary and secondary texts from different political perspectives. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 383 - History of the Colony and State of South Carolina (3 credits)


    A study of South Carolina’s origins and development and a survey of recent South Carolina history with emphasis on social and institutional development.
  
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    HIST 385 - Regional Studies in American History (3 credits)


    This course will focus on selected regions of the Americas and may emphasize the development of the political, social, and cultural history of the instructor’s chosen region of study through a variety of lenses. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S.
  
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    HIST 386 - History of American Women (3 credits)


    The social, political and economic roles and changing status of women in America.
  
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    HIST 388 - Hollywood’s America (3 credits)


    An examination of selected topics in American political, social and cultural history through the medium of Hollywood-produced films. Topics may include the filmed presentation of World War II, gender and race issues, Cold War American culture, and “American Memory” through film.
  
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    HIST 389 - The New South (3 credits)


    The Bourbon era, agrarian revolt, industrial revolution, racial problems, and the changes resulting from the impact of the Depression, New Deal, and two world wars.
  
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    HIST 390 - History of American Business (3 credits)


    (Prereq: HIST 201  or HIST 202 ) The course will survey the American economy from colonial times to the late twentieth century. The development of agriculture, commerce, manufacturing, and finance will be explored. Emphasis will be given the roles of technology and innovation concurrent with territorial expansion. Students will review government policies regarding taxation, currency, labor, and banking.
  
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    HIST 392 - Museums and Communities (3 credits)


    (=ANTH 381 ) This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of museum studies, covering the history, development, and definitions of a museum. This course will explore how museums function, including operations, interpretation and representation of the past, exhibitions, collections care, education, and public programs. Students in this course will examine current practices and issues in museums, with an emphasis on museums’ relationships to their communities, and their roles in society and culture. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 393 - Crime and Punishment in Early America (3 credits)


    This course examines criminal behavior (or actions defined as such) and its consequences in Early America. Themes and topics may include the development of systems of law in the colonies, modes of punishment, methods and theories of deterrence, legal and judicial inequities in the new nation, the emergence of penitentiaries and prison systems, attempts at rehabilitation of convicts and the philosophies or rationale behind those efforts. F, S, May.
  
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    HIST 395 Q - Introduction to Public History (3 credits)


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of public history. It explores the methods, theories and practices of public history. The course examines such public history tracks as museums, archives, national parks, cultural resource management and historic preservation, and introduces students to such topics as oral history, popular culture and environmental protection. While studying professions related to and meeting professionals in public history, the course will survey and implement public history tools, which may include technology, media, consulting, tourism and exhibits. Students will also be immersed in real-world experiences dealing with public history and learn more about post-baccalaureate employment opportunities as well as graduate programs in public history. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 396 - Manuscripts and Archives: An Introduction (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to a range of important issues concerning the source of the raw materials that most professional historians work with: archival documents and manuscripts. Students learn to locate, read, describe, transcribe, and digitize a variety of original archival materials that have never been published before. We also trace the broad history of libraries and archives, evaluate a wide range of digital archives, and consider the effects of the digital revolution on archival studies. This course includes an examination of the historiography and theorizing of archives and manuscripts. F, S.
  
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    HIST 397 - Digital History (3 credits)


    This history course investigates how the past has been rapidly digitized and explores the debates in the field of digital humanities knowledge production. From debates in the field, to theoretical approaches, to methodological practices, to technological tools, this course explores how the past has been preserved and presented in a digital format. Students critically analyze digital materials and evaluate and interpret such documents as historical primary sources, memoirs, literary works, films, photographs, artifacts, music, and art. Offered as needed.
  
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    HIST 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Written contract between student and instructor, approved by the department chair and dean). This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    HIST 401 Q* - Rome: The Imperial City (3 credits)


    This course examines the development of the Roman Empire from the age of Augustus through the fifth century, focusing on the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural realms or the Empire, particularly through the lens of the built environment. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 402 Q* - History of Early Christianity (3 credits)


    This course explores the political, economic, social, theological, and cultural developments of Christianity in the Mediterranean, situating the early Christian movement within the historical context of its Jewish roots through its westward expansion, c. 4 BCE-600 CE. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 403 Q* - Gender and Sexuality in the Early Church, c. 30-600 CE (3 credits)


    Using the lens of gender, this course explores the political, economic, social, theological, an cultural developments of the Christianity in the Mediterranean, c. 30-600 CE, situating the early Christian movement within the historical context of Roman gender constructs and the shifting power structures of the Roman Empire. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 404 Q* - Topics in Late Antiquity (3 credits)


    This course will examine a variety of historical developments that took place in late antiquity (c. 200-800 CE) through such lenses as the political, social, religious, cultural, economic, intellectual, and military changes of the period. Topics may include sport and entertainment; barbarian migrations, ethnicity, and identity; the transformations of Mediterranean powers, shifts in late-antique art, architecture, and urbanization, or other topics as determined by the instructor. This course may be taken for up to six hours of credit under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 410 - Nationalism, Revolution and War in the Ottoman Empire, 1908-1923 (3 credits)


    This seminar will explore the rise of revolutionary and nationalist movements during the last decades of the Ottoman Empire, the Balkan Wars, World War I, and the post-war peace. Primary attention will be paid to the impact these movements, wars and settlements had on the Empire, society, identity, and the successor states. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    HIST 440 - Pacific Front of World War II (3 credits)


    This course can be used as an elective or cognate. This course examines the rise, fall and collapse of the Japanese empire from 1931 to 1945. The course explores the influence of domestic and international factors that led to the war, the conduct of the war from a strategic and operational level, as well as the decision to bring the war to a halt.
  
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    HIST 442 - Sexuality and Gender in Medieval Europe (3 credits)


    (Prereq: HIST 101 ) This course introduces students to the application of gender theory in explicating a crucial era in Western history’s development, the Middle Ages. Students will examine literary, artistic, and medical-philosophical ideas that reveal the ways sectors of medieval society defined femininity, masculinity, non-gendered and transgendered bodies and behaviors as it constructed a social and biological order that proved an important foundation of modern European understandings.
  
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    HIST 443 - Modern Colonialism (3 credits)


    European colonial and imperial practices from approximately 1830 to the present. Course will explore settler colonialism, informal empire, cultural hegemony, “civilizing missions”, under-development, independence movements, and post-colonialism.
  
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    HIST 444 - The Norman Conquests of England, Sicily and South Italy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: HIST 101 ) This course introduces students to the complexities and consequences of military action undertaken by the newly-Christianized Normans as they conquered the kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England and Byzantine/Muslim Sicily and South Italy. The Normans, only minor nobles of little consequence at the outset, soon became the dominant feudal monarchs of Western Europe. Their acculturation in their new lands, and their political, artistic, textual and legal strategies introduced Western Europe to new expressions of individual power and state authority.
  
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    HIST 446 - Age of Crusades (3 credits)


    (Prereq: HIST 101  or HIST 111 ) This class examines the origins of crusading ideals, as well as the evolution of their religious, economic and military expressions. Particular attention is paid to the many variant perspectives expressed in documents of the period; these include Byzantine critiques of Western crusaders, Muslim depictions of Christian opponents, Jewish protestation of anti-Semitic acts, Christian rhetoric promoting crusade, and gendered responses to crusade.
  
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    HIST 447 - History of Western Medicine from Antiquity to the Renaissance (3 credits)


    This course examines the development of rational medicine and its alternatives from classical Greece and the emergence of the Hippocratic tradition (5th century BCE) through the Black Death (14th century CE). Students will study the social and economic dynamics that support and fuel medico-scientific development; will consider medical competition between educated scholars and unlettered empirics; will evaluate the interactions between scientific medicine and religion, and between medicine and economics.
  
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    HIST 448 - Early Modern Science and Medicine (3 credits)


    A survey of Science (Natural Philosophy) and Medicine from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment, c. 1400-1800 CE, including such topics as the recovery of ancient authorities such as Aristotle, Galen, and Hippocrates, the new heliocentric astronomy, the new anatomy of Vesalius, the rise of experimental and mathematical science, Harvey and the circulation of the Blood, Baconian, and Cartesian philosophies of science, new scientific societies, chemical medicine, the rise of mechanism, and the cultural, religious, rhetorical, and political context of science, health, and healing.
  
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    HIST 450 - The City in European History (3 credits)


    This course provides an overview European urbanization from antiquity through the present era in terms of multiple case studies. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 451 - History of Modern Medicine and the Body (3 credits)


    This course examines the development of scientific medicine as well as medical and scientific approaches to the body from 1800 to the present. The course may focus on the making of modern physicians and patients, transformations in public health and epidemiology, the roles of gender and race in treating “unhealthy” bodies, and other topics. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, May, and Su.
  
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    HIST 455 Q* - Special Topics in Latin American History (3 credits)


    This course will examine a variety of Latin American historical developments that may cover a specific period or larger chronology from the time of ancient civilizations, the European encounter, colonialism, the national period, and up to recent history. Topics may include but are not limited to: women in the Americas, urban history, race and nation, intellectual history, and 20th century revolutions. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 460 - American Military History (3 credits)


    A study of principal military strategies and their imprint on American military strategy and tactics; the causes of selected wars in American history and the conduct of war by the nation’s armed forces; war’s impact on America’s political, economic, and military systems; and the lasting imprint of war on America’s military personnel and civilian population.
  
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    HIST 461 - The Pursuit of Peace (3 credits)


    This course examines the evolution of diplomacy and pacifist thought, the advancement of international statecraft and its historical response to global crises, the efforts of individuals, NGOs, politicians and states to secure and sustain peace in contemporary crises, divergent historical narratives, and the role of historians in conflict resolution, transformation and historical reconciliation. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 462 - The Causes, Conduct, and Consequences of War (3 credits)


    The Causes, Conduct, and Consequences of War (3). This course is a detailed examination of the fundamental causes of modern war from the late eighteenth century to the present; the modernization of war in purpose, scope, and conduct; and the imprint of war on individuals, societies, and governments. S.
  
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    HIST 463 Q* - Topics in Race and Ethnicity (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to selected issues in the history of race and ethnicity. Topics may include the historical underpinnings of the legal, social, and political formation of race and ethnicity experienced by peoples and societies around the globe. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. Offered as needed.
  
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    HIST 475 Q - The U.S. in the World (3 credits)


    This course takes an integrated social studies approach to examine important themes in U.S. and world history. While exploring chronological developments, attention will be given to different political systems, economic conditions, and geographic skills. Students will also practice critical writing and presentation skills in the course. The course will be of particular benefit to middle-level education majors and other students interested in social studies teaching. S.
  
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    HIST 485 Q* - Topics in the Medieval Middle East (3 credits)


    This course will examine a variety of historical developments that took place in the medieval Middle East through such lenses as the political, social, religious, cultural, economic, intellectual, and military changes of the period. Topics may include Mongols and Mamluks; gender in the early Islamic world, orientalism and identity in the Islamic world; the Spanish caliphate, shifts in classical Islamic art, architecture, and urbanization, or other topics as determined by the instructor. This course may be taken for up to six hours of credit under different topics. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    HIST 492 - Topics in History (1 to 3 credits)


    Reading and research on selected historical subjects. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    HIST 493 Q* - Topics in History (1 to 3 credits)


    Reading and research on selected historical subjects. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics. F, S, Su.
  
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    HIST 494 - Topics in History (1 to 3 credits)


    Reading and research on selected historical subjects. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    HIST 495 Q - Internship in History (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the adviser and department chair required) This course is open to history majors with a minimum 2.50 GPA and who have completed at least 30 credit hours at the time of enrollment. Off-campus internships may include additional requirements, including a minimum 3.00 GPA and completion of at least 12 credit hours of history. The internship requires 40 hours of employment per credit hour, a reflective journal, and a research report. The purpose of the internship is to provide students with practical training and experience in history-related work and to introduce them to local, regional and national employers in fields of applied history. The course may be repeated under different topics for up to 12 credit hours. Six credit hours of this course may be applied to upper-level history major requirements. F, S, May, Su.
  
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    HIST 496 - The Byzantine Empire (c300-1453) (3 credits)


    A study of the eastern half of the Roman Empire, from the inauguration of Constantinople c.330, through the development of the Byzantine Empire as a distinct Medieval civilization, and ending with the Turkish conquest of 1453.
  
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    HIST 498 - Senior Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of HIST 250  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) A seminar designed to expose students to the most important varieties of historical interpretation and the methodologies employed by historians through the centuries. While the focus will be on historiography and methodology in the modern world, some consideration will be given to examples from earlier periods. To provide continuity and coherence, professors may elect to focus a significant part of the course on the historiography and methodology of a particular topic in their area of expertise. A minimum of fifteen pages of graded, written work, and at least one graded oral presentation is required. Any departmental exit exam(s) will be administered in this course.
  
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    HIST 499 - Senior Thesis (3 credits)


    A course designed to introduce the student to the principles of historical research and writing. History majors may apply during their junior year through the department chair. Only selected seniors will be admitted. Primary criteria are an outstanding academic record and a genuine interest in graduate school.

Honors

  
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    ARTH 105H - History of Western Art I (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 105 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) A survey of the visual arts and their relevance to their times from the Paleolithic period through the Gothic period. F, S.
  
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    ARTH 106H - History of Western Art II (3 credits)


    (=HIST 106 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) A survey of the visual arts and their relevance to their times from the Renaissance to the present. F, S.
  
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    ARTH 107H - World Art (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 107 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) A survey of World art from prehistory to the present, including but not limited to African, Asian, Islamic, and Oceanic art as well as art of the Americas, exploring diverse cultural experiences from a visual perspective. F, S.
  
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    BIOL 121H - Biological Science I (3 credits)


    (=BIOL 121 ) (Prereq: Honors student with placement into MATH 131  or above, or have a ‘C’ or better in MATH 130 ) (Coreq: BIOL 121L ) An introduction to biological principles for students majoring in biology and related fields of study. Topics include scientific method, chemistry of life, macromolecules, cell structure and function, mendelian and molecular genetics. F, S, Su.
 

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