Oct 28, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Honors

  
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    COMM 150H - Media, Self and the World (3 credits)


    (=COMM 150 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) Examines the many ways media systems and mediated communication shape our understanding of ourselves and our world. How various media (e.g., television, internet, newspapers) interact and deliver content (e.g., entertainment, news, advertising) that influence the “real world” are examined. Also looks at how new technologies allow easier direct access to content. Special attention is given to how students can apply media literacy skills to their academic and personal lives. F, W, S, M, Su.
  
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    HONR 101 - Honors Seminar (3 credits)


    This course is a University Honors Program graduation requirement. A humanities-based interdisciplinary course designed to introduce students to important themes and topics from different traditions and in multiple engagements.
  
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    HONR 105 - Critical Methods of Inquiry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Students must be enrolled in the University Honors Program) This course introduces students to models and methodologies of critical thinking, and prepares them to utilize critical thinking techniques to evaluate formal and informal claims and arguments. Special attention is paid to cognitive biases, informal logical fallacies, and the disciplinary assumptions that undergird argumentative claims from a variety of fields. F, S.
  
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    HONR 201 - Great Themes: Perspectives in the Humanities (3 credits)


    (Restricted to students in the University Honors Program. Students cannot register for HONR 202 or HONR 203 in the same semester as HONR 201.) This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of a significant theme chosen as part of the honors curriculum. Students enrolled in HONR 201 will concentrate on one or more disciplines in the Humanities from which to approach the theme. Students from HONR 202  Great Themes: Perspectives in the Social Sciences and HONR 203  Great Themes: Global Perspectives will share the classroom experience with those enrolled in this class. S.
  
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    HONR 202 - Great Themes: Perspectives in the Social Sciences (3 credits)


    (Restricted to students in the University Honors Program. Students cannot register for HONR 201 or HONR 203 in the same semester as HONR 202.) This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of a significant theme chosen as part of the honors curriculum. Students enrolled in HONR 202 will concentrate on one or more disciplines in the Social Sciences from which to approach the theme. Students from HONR 201  Great Themes: Perspectives in the Humanities and HONR 203  Great Themes: Global Perspectives will share the classroom experience with those enrolled in this class. S.
  
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    HONR 203 - Great Themes: Global Perspectives (3 credits)


    (Restricted to students in the University Honors Program. Students cannot register for HONR 201 or HONR 202 in the same semester as HONR 203) This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of a significant theme chosen as part of the honors curriculum. Students enrolled in HONR 203 will concentrate on one or more global perspectives from which to approach the theme. Students from HONR 201  Great Themes: Perspectives in the Humanities and HONR 202  Great Themes: Perspectives in the Social Sciences will share the classroom experience with those enrolled in this class. S.
  
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    HONR 207 - Peer Mentor Training (0 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) In this course, students will prepare to be peer mentors for HONR 101  classes. The course is open to the University Honors Program Research Scholars only. Pass/Fail grading only. S.
  
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    HONR 301 - Special Topics in Global Studies (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Enrollment in the Honor’s Program or permission of the instructor) An interdisciplinary examination of selected themes and topics that shed light on a broad range of cultural, economic, political, social, and cultural vectors that link nations and societies. Offered as needed.
  
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    HONR 302 - Special Topics in Cultural Studies (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Enrollment in the Honor’s Program or permission of the instructor) An interdisciplinary examination of selected themes and topics that shed light on the ways in which cultural meaning is generated, disseminated, and produced through various practices, beliefs and institutions. Offered as needed.
  
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    HONR 304 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Enrollment in the Honor’s Program or permission of the instructor) An interdisciplinary course on environmental topics such as biodiversity, sustainability, conservation, pollution, climate change, and human ecology. Offered as needed.
  
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    HONR 305 - Special Topics in Social Justice (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: Enrollment in the Honor’s Program or permission of the instructor) An examination of themes and topics related to the realities of conflict, environmental degradation, poverty, the sex trades, sweatshops, and militarism viewed in terms of theories of social justice and strategies for social change. Offered as needed.
  
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    HONR 306 - Oral History in Action (3 credits)


    (Restricted to honors students or permission of the instructor) The class explores experiential learning via interview and ethnography. Students interview members of the local community to build a better understanding of local history and the history of Coastal Carolina University. Offered as needed.
  
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    HONR 325 Q* - Service Learning (3 credits)


    Students participate in public service with local agencies in order to understand the relationship between civic responsibility and higher education. In the classroom, students reflect upon the function and necessity of their service as well as on its limitations in responding to specific community needs and general social problems.
  
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    HONR 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    This course will be offered as an elective to satisfy a junior level University Honors Program requirement.
  
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    HONR 498 - Honors Capstone Seminar (3 credits)


    Reading and writing on a selected theme. Class presentations will be provided by faculty from a variety of disciplines.
  
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    HONR 499 - Honors Senior Thesis/Project (3 credits)


    (Prereq: HONR 498 ) Each student undertakes an original research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the student’s major area of study.
  
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    PHIL 318H - Business Ethics (3 credits)


    (=PHIL 318 ) (Prereq: Honors student with sophomore standing or higher, or permission of the instructor) Ethical theory is presented and applied to business cases involving individual, corporate, and governmental rights and responsibilities. F, S, Su.
  
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    POLI 101H - Introduction to World Politics (3 credits)


    (=POLI 101 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) An introduction to global politics connecting the ideas, cultures, and policies of individual countries to the international level. Students will examine conflict and cooperation on the planet in the areas of security, the environment, economic development, financial institutions, and human rights toward a better understanding of global citizenship in the 21st Century. F, S.
  
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    POLI 201H - Introduction to American Government (3 credits)


    (POLI 201 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) An introduction to the national institutions and political processes of American government. Students will examine the formation, development, organization, and powers of national institutions; the interaction between political processes and political behavior; the development of civil rights and civil liberties; and the policy process. F, S, Su.
  
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    PSYC 101H - General Psychology (3 credits)


    (=PSYC 101 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) A general introduction to the scientific study of behavior. The theme of basic research will be followed through the study of personality, learning and memory, cognition, developmental, social, abnormal, and the biological bases of behavior, in addition to some other selected topics. F, S.
  
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    THEA 130H - Principles of Dramatic Analysis (3 credits)


    (=THEA 130 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) This course is designed to cultivate students understanding of contemporary cultural/literary theories, critical evaluation, analysis, and interpretation of dramatic literature and performance. The class emphasizes traditional and non-traditional canons of dramatic literature, traditional structures and forms of drama and cultural arguments within their literary, historical and philosophical contexts.
  
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    VPA 103H - Inquiring Minds: Topics, Ideas, and Expression in the Fine Arts (3 credits)


    (=VPA 103 ) (Prereq: Honors student or permission of the instructor) This course is designed to provide the student with the basic understanding of how the arts critically influence and culturally enhance our everyday experience. Each section will present a variety of modes that are rooted in artistic expression. Topics will draw from one or more of the following disciplines: Creative Writing, Music, Theatre, and the Visual Arts. F, S, M, Su.

Hospitality, Resort, and Tourism Management

  
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    HRTM 101 Q* - Introduction to Resort Tourism Management (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to the exciting and diverse hospitality and tourism industry, in the context of resort destination areas. Through classroom lectures, in which industry guest speakers will participate, case studies and off-campus industry site visits students gain an understanding of the scope and complexity of the industry. This course discusses the many internship and career opportunities in resort areas of the hospitality and tourism industry. F, S.
  
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    HRTM 150 Q - Tourism and Society (3 credits)


    The course facilitates students’ understanding of the social psychology of tourism and of the social, physical, and economic benefits and costs exchanged by travelers, workers, and communities engaged in the tourism process. Students complete case studies and conduct ethnographic field research in which they observe tourists in their local community in order to better understand the benefits and challenges of living in a tourist destination area for both workers and for the host communities. F, S.
  
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    HRTM 180 Q - Guest Services I (1 credit)


    (Prereq: HRTM 101 ) The Guest Services I internship is a supervised work experience in which students are employed in a “heart-of-the-house” or support function within the context of the resort tourism industry. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to maintain a detailed journal relative to their workplace activities, establish specific learning goals, complete a reflective essay regarding the experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of 240 hours in the internship environment. F, S, Su.
  
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    HRTM 230 Q - Introductory Resort Tourism Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: HRTM 101 ) The Introductory Resort Tourism Internship is a supervised work experience, for non-resort tourism management majors, in which students are employed in an entry-level position within the context of the resort tourism industry. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to maintain a detailed journal relative to their workplace activities, establish specific learning goals, complete a reflective essay regarding the experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of 240 hours in the internship environment. This course may be repeated one time for additional credit (6 credits maximum); however, the experience must vary in some substantive way (e.g. gaining experience with a different employer or with a different job description); repeat enrollment must be approved in advance by the Director of the Wall Center for Excellence. F, S, Su.
  
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    HRTM 280 Q - Guest Services (1 to 3 credits)


    (Coreq: HRTM 101 ) The Guest Services Internship is a supervised work experience in which students are employed in an approved hospitality- or tourism-related setting for at least 130 and up to 390 work hours (130 hours per academic credit). Students are required to establish learning goals, answer weekly journal questions about their experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students may receive from one to three (1-3) credit hours for the Guest Services Internship course, which may be repeated two (2) times to satisfy the three (3) required credits of internship experience for the HRTM major. F, S, Su.
  
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    HRTM 282 - Survey of Food & Beverage Management (3 credits)


    (=PGMP 282 ) (Prereq: not recommended at the Freshman level) Provides students with an opportunity to learn concepts and skills related to food and beverage service operations. Class time will be used to present concepts and base knowledge, while lab time will be used to develop actual food preparation skills and food and beverage costing techniques. F, S.
  
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    HRTM 349 - Revenue Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 201  and CBAD 202 , or by permission of the instructor) The main objectives of this course is to understand the techniques used in maximizing revenues and managing costs in the hospitality industry. This course introduces students to the principles of food and labor cost control, menu engineering, bottom-up approach to pricing, and cost management. The course also covers important topics including, but not limited to, the following: revenue management applications that hospitality managers can use to increase revenue without increasing products or promotions, strategies for tapping into new markets, and techniques for effectively and efficiently delivering products and services to customers. F.
  
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    HRTM 364 - Resort Operations Management (3 credits)


    (=CBAD 364 ) (Prereq: CBAD 292  and CBAD 301 ) (Coreq: CBAD 350  and CBAD 363 ) A study of the interactions among organizational resources used in some combination to provide resort-tourism products and services. Special attention is given to decision making using conventional and quantitative tools and techniques within the context of a resort-tourism setting. F, S.
  
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    HRTM 380 - Tourism Sales (1 credit)


    (Prereq: HRTM 180  and HRTM 280 ) A six month internship experience in resort tourism sales, i.e. conference and meeting sales, room sales, banquet sales, tour/travel sales. This course includes biweekly instruction from faculty and management on sales techniques.
  
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    HRTM 381 - International Internship (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of 54 semester hours) Internship experience in a tourism-related field conducted in a country other than that in which the majority of the student’s academic coursework is completed. S.
  
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    HRTM 385 - Current Issues in Resort Tourism (3 credits)


    This course provides future tourism industry leaders with an in-depth understanding of the critical issues currently affecting the tourism businesses operation in resort destinations. Students become familiar with trade literature in the tourism industry.
  
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    HRTM 386 - Applied Tourism Research (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of 54 semester hours) Cases and projects in tourism management, marketing, and tourism destination planning. This course will include both classroom instruction and field research. F.
  
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    HRTM 387 - Conventions and Event Management (3 credits)


    The course provides information on systems, technologies, and organizations in the meetings, expositions, events, and convention (MEEC) industry. S.
  
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    HRTM 393 - Management Information Systems (3 credits)


    (=CBAD 393 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 110  or equivalent, and CBAD 301 ) A study of the use of information systems in business, emphasis is on the identification of practical, managerial, and ethical dilemmas related to the development, implementation, and use of information systems. F, S.
  
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    HRTM 467 - Real Estate Finance and Investments (3 credits)


    (=FIN 462 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 363 ) Principles and practices in real estate finance focusing on institutions, instruments, and determinants of terms and availability of credit, topic include interest and yield mechanics, cash flow analysis, risk analysis, and various loan strategies or packages.
  
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    HRTM 474 Q* - Quality Process Management (3 credits)


    (=MGMT 481 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301  and completion of 84 semester hours) The systematic process through which managers regulate organizational activities to meet planned goals and standards of quality. Topics will include different types of quality control processes, total quality management, product and service quality techniques, and the uses of information technology for insuring quality. S.
  
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    HRTM 480 Q - Resort Management Training (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: HRTM 230  or HRTM 280 ; or permission from the department chair or WCOB Career Services director) The Management Training Internship is a supervised work experience in which students are employed up to 780 work hours (130 hours per academic credit). Students are tasked with learning and applying the management systems utilized by a hospitality or tourism organization. Students are required to establish learning goals, answer weekly journal questions about their experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students may receive from three to six (3-6) credit hours for the Management Training Internship and the course may be repeated two (2) times for a total of six (6) credits. However, students cannot earn more than a total of nine (9) HRTM internship credit hours over the course of a single undergraduate program, including those earned from HRTM 230 or HRTM 280, and only nine (9) credit hours may be applied toward the minimum credit hours required for a single Coastal Carolina University degree. F, S, Su.
  
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    HRTM 490 Q* - Seminar in Resort Tourism Planning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 301 , CBAD 350 , and CBAD 363 ) This course examines resort design and public policy in tourism destinations. Special emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between tourist demand, tourism goods and services, and tourist host communities. Students develop plans for a proposed tourism site. F, S.

Humanities and Fine Arts

  
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    HFA 110 - Research Fellows I (0 to 1 credit)


    (Prereq: Acceptance to the Edwards College Research Fellows Program) This course introduces students to the Edwards College and to its Research Fellows Program. Students develop skills in conducting primary research, writing (synthesizing and presenting information to varied audiences), and editing. They develop communication skills by conducting interviews, participating in small group discussions, and delivering formal presentations. Pass/Fail grading only. S.
  
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    HFA 133 - MINDSET for Academic Success (0-1 credits)


    MINDSET for Academic Success is a course designed for students who are majoring in disciplines housed in the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. The purpose of the course is to teach and reinforce strategies for academic success and to develop a new MINDSET (motivation, initiative, navigation, direction, study skills, expectations, and time management). Students will learn best practices for success in their college careers.
  
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    HFA 205 - Introduction to Cultural Heritage Studies (3 credits)


    This course introduces students to the concepts of cultural heritage. It explores the range and breadth of cultural heritage, from physical structures to cultural traditions, from man-made objects to natural landscapes, and from the pre-historic to the modern world. Students are also presented with critical theory in the discipline and methods and approaches to the protection and preservation of cultural heritage. F, S.
  
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    HFA 210 - Research Fellows II (0 to 1 credit)


    (Prereq: HFA 110 ) This course introduces Edwards College Research Fellows to the principles and practices of secondary research: disciplinary-specific databases and digital archives; governmental websites; quantitative and qualitative methods, theoretical lenses, etc. Topics include compiling a scholarly annotated bibliography and/or a literature review; interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating sources; ensuring academic integrity; understanding citation and format style guides; and knowing academic expectations for quality in the content and presentation of a researched article. Students will prepare a research guide for students entering their major. Pass/Fail grading only. S.
  
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    HFA 250 - Research Methods in African Diaspora Studies (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to a range of qualitative research methods as they are applied to the study of the African diaspora, especially the peoples of African descent in the Americas. Students examine theoretical and conceptual issues and develop skills with methodologies employed when conducting humanities research. Students investigate the ways that texts and other discourse medium have represented people of African descent in literature, media images, and in history. Students prepare a preliminary research plan followed by an original research paper employing the methods and theories learned in the class. Offered as needed.
  
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    HFA 391 Q - Press Project Workshop (1 to 3 credits)


    This course introduces students to and involves them in the hands-on work of a university press. Students will help to develop press projects and will work on a variety of print and digital components. Participants will learn and practice various steps in the publication process and the production of multimedia content. Activities and themes will change based on current press projects. This course may be repeated for up to nine credit hours. S.
  
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    HFA 399 - Independent Study in Humanities and Fine Arts (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: written contract between the student and instructor, approved by the adviser and associate dean of the Edwards College) This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics. F, S, Su.

Intelligence and National Securities Studies

  
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    INTEL 200 - Introduction to Intelligence and National Security (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction into the field of intelligence and its impact on policy areas related to security. Specifically, the class will examine the key elements of the intelligence process and how they have been utilized to support security policy. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 300 - Introduction to Intelligence Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction into the field of intelligence and its impact on policy areas related to security. Specifically, it will examine the role of strategic intelligence and intelligence agencies as a tool of United States foreign policy since 1945. F, S.
  
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    INTEL 301 - Research and Communications in Intelligence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: INTEL 200  or permission of the instructor) This course is an introduction to the areas of research and communication in intelligence and national security studies. It will review the nature of inquiry and the application of critical thinking skills in the field of Intelligence and National Security Studies. The course will also explore how research is conducted in a variety of professional contexts and discuss common intellectual traps which undermine analytic reasoning. The course will also explore the elements of effective communication in the field of Intelligence and National Security Studies. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 303 Q - Women in Intelligence and National Security (3 credits)


    This class provides insights into women’s leadership and professional development in Intelligence and National Security. The course begins with an overview of feminist theory and the masculinization of the state. Students will also learn to read and think critically about how gender and other identity markers like race, class, ability, and citizenship shape women’s experiences in these fields. In addition to in-class discussions, this course provides students with the opportunity to meet and learn first-hand from women who are employed in the field of Intelligence and National Security while completing an experiential project on the issue of human trafficking. S.
  
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    INTEL 310 - Intelligence Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: INTEL 200  or permission of the instructor) An in-depth exploration of various intelligence issues with a focus on building analysis skills for the purpose of intelligence analysis. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 311 - Intelligence Communications (3 credits)


    (Prereq: INTEL 200  or permission of the instructor) This course is an examination of how intelligence information is communicated on both the organizational and individual levels. At the level of the organization, the course examines how intelligence is shared with various governmental and non-governmental actors. At the individual level, the course emphasizes the practical delivery of intelligence information in oral and written formats. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 312 - Intelligence Operations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: INTEL 200  or permission of the instructor) This course is a survey of the limits, possibilities, and ethical dilemmas for the conduct of operations in support of the intelligence community. The course examines operations related to the collection of intelligence information including espionage, interrogation, imagery analysis, communications intelligence, and counterintelligence. Operations that are designed to have a direct policy effect - covert operations, direct action, and information operations are also considered. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 330 - National Security (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) In the 21st century, direct threats to America’s security have come from a variety of states and non-state actors. This course explores the evolving structure and mission of the United States national-security community, and studies current responses to the constantly changing landscape of contemporary threats. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 335 - Homeland Security (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course is a survey of the actors, issues and processes involved in areas that support homeland security, including anti-terrorism, emergency management, and all-hazards analysis. It will also consider the benefits and problems of intelligence support to homeland security policy in the United States. S.
  
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    INTEL 337 - Law Enforcement Intelligence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course provides a comprehensive overview of the issues, functions, methods, and theories attendant to law enforcement intelligence operations, with an emphasis on the current law enforcement intelligence apparatuses in use in the United States. Topics include a review of basic intelligence processes, including collection, assessment, analysis, evaluation of source and data, dissemination, tasking, and management. The course will detail the history of the law enforcement community’s adoption of intelligence processes, the application of basic intelligence techniques in the law enforcement context, and review basic intelligence methodology. Other topics will include the examination of national intelligence models and the emergence of intelligence-led policing initiatives in the U.S. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 340 - National Security Strategy (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course is an examination of classic and modern strategic theory and its applicability on the use of modern warfare by democratic societies. Topics for the course will include counter-insurgency warfare, the role of non-state actors, and the impact of the global context on strategic decision-making. S.
  
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    INTEL 341 - Intelligence and War (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course explores the role of intelligence in the preparation, conduct, and cessation of armed conflict. The course traces the evolution of modern military organizations and the use of intelligence in the success or failure of these organizations. Current intelligence practices and methods employed by and for US warfighters are also discussed. S.
  
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    INTEL 343 - Terrorism and Political Violence (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) A survey of the historical and ideological origins of selected revolutionary and/or terrorist movements with a consideration of the role played by political violence in modern society.
  
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    INTEL 344 - Weapons of Mass Destruction (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) This course examines the spread of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, as well as ballistic missiles. These systems taken together are commonly referred to as weapons of mass destruction, or WMD. Students learn what nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and ballistic missiles are, and who has or might have such weapons. Students also study the actual and theoretical use of WMD by states and terrorists, consider their strategic value as instruments of national security, and grapple with problems of arms control, disarmament, and intelligence.  F, S.
  
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    INTEL 360 - Foreign Intelligence Services (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101 ) This course examines several intelligence systems outside the Anglosphere. The different intelligence organizations of each system are analyzed in terms of the national political, social, and economic institutions in which they are embedded. In a series of case studies, the intelligence activities of both U.S. allies and likely adversaries are compared. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 399 - Independent Study (1-6 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) A directed course of study on a unique topic within the field of intelligence and national security studies. This course may be repeated once, so that a student can earn a maximum of six total credit hours in two completions, with each completed course covering a different topic. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 423 - Terrorist Organizations: Al Qaeda (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 201  or permission of the instructor) This course will focus on the development and operations of terrorist organizations with a specific examination of al-Qaeda and its place in the broader Islamic revival movement. Topics include its origins, history, ideology, organization, strategy, and tactics. Students will also be introduced to several points of view and analytical approaches to answering the question: What is al-Qaeda? F.
  
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    INTEL 441 - Intelligence in the Cold War (3 credits)


    (Prereq: POLI 101  or permission of the instructor) For nearly half a century, the world was engulfed in what is often described as the most permeating political rivalry of modern times. Far from being simply a prolonged tactical standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union, the Cold War shaped the politics and ideology of an entire era. It also molded the institutional character and operational outlook of intelligence institutions in both East and West. This course traces the impact of the Cold War on contemporary aspects of intelligence, by exploring its role in some of the most critical flashpoints of the era and analyzing classic cases of international espionage that took place in the context of that tumultuous period. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 451 Q - Applied Intelligence Analysis (0 to 1 credit)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) This course offers hands-on familiarity with intelligence-briefing conventions for members of the Chanticleer Intelligence Brief (CIB) student group. Students acquire an experiential understanding of open-source intelligence collection, production and delivery, centering on their own regional- or issue-based concentration. This one-credit course may be taken for zero credit with the instructor’s approval. It may also be repeated for up to eight credits, three of which may be counted toward the Intelligence and National Security Studies major or minor. F, S.
  
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    INTEL 491 - Topics in Intelligence and Security Studies (3 credits)


    Reading and research on selected subjects in intelligence and security studies. Open to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit under different topics. (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Reading and research on selected subjects in intelligence and security studies. Open to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 494 - Intelligence and National Security Studies Capstone (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of INTEL 200 , INTEL 301 , INTEL 310 , INTEL 311 , INTEL 312 , and 90 credit hours; or permission of the instructor) This course is designed to be a culminating experience in the study of intelligence and national security studies at the undergraduate level. Beyond a study of the contemporary issues and challenges in the field, students will utilize their accumulated knowledge and skills in the production and presentation of a piece of original research. F, S.
  
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    INTEL 495 - Internship in Intelligence and Security Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) The purpose of the internship is to provide students with practical training and experience in security-related work and to introduce them to local, regional and national employers in the field. Students may do an internship for academic credit of three 3 hours and must work at least 120 hours at an organization during the semester registered. Grades are determined by a combination of the evaluation of the internship performance by the facility supervisor and faculty supervisor. Requirements are specifically stated in a contract to be signed by the student, faculty supervisor and facility supervisor. F, S, Su.
  
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    INTEL 496 - Honors Directed Research (3 credits)


    Course Restriction(s): course enrollment is limited to students pursing Honors recognition as Intelligence and National Security Studies majors. (Prereq: HONR 101 ; one 300 level HONR course, INTEL 300  for honors; and permission of the instructor) This course is the first of a two-part requirement to earn honors recognition for the undergraduate Intelligence and National Security degree program. Taken in the first term, this is an Honors Directed Research course which prepares the student for completing the Honors Thesis in the next term. The course involves directed research project development, methodology, research design, thesis statement, and literature review. At the completion of the course, the student turns in a Thesis Prospectus as well as provides a research presentation to faculty members. F.
  
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    INTEL 497 - Honors Senior Thesis (3 credits)


    Course Restriction(s): course enrollment is limited to students pursing Honors recognition as Intelligence and National Security Studies majors. (Prereq: HONR 101 ; one 300 level HONR course, INTEL 300  for honors; INTEL 496 ; and permission of the instructor) This course is the second of a two-part requirement to earn honors recognition for the undergraduate Intelligence and National Security degree program. Taken in the second term, this is an Honors Senior Thesis course which culminates the student’s honors thesis requirement. The course involves the completion of a directed research project, including all components of the Thesis Prospectus developed in the previous term, with a complete bibliography. The Final Thesis must reflect an appropriate level of scholarship and advanced writing proficiency to be accepted as fulfilling the Honors Senior Thesis requirement. At the completion of the course, the student turns in a Final Honors Senior Thesis as well as provides a research presentation to faculty members. S.
  
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    INTEL 498 - Variable Credit Internship (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor or minimum GPA of 3.0) This course is designed to facilitate off-campus, semester-long internships for students interested in the practice of intelligence and security studies. It is designed to be variable credit based on the needs of the student. F, S, Su.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    IDS 190 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Humanistic Thought (3 credits)


    This course uses an interdisciplinary cultural studies approach to explore a specific topic or issue. Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplinary perspectives in the humanities and articulate how multiple perspectives can lead to a more complex understanding of an issue. Topics will change depending on instructor, but may include media and climate change, the cultural studies of food, and feminist science studies. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.
  
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    IDS 191 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human and Social Behavior (3 credits)


    This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore special topics or issues related to the study of human behavior, either within individuals or among various groups of people. This course will facilitate critical thinking and the evaluation of various ideas and perspectives in order to better understand social influences and cultural beliefs impacting the world around us. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.
  
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    IDS 302 - Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    This course is an interdisciplinary examination of selected themes relating to topics involving multiple approaches to learning and cultural analysis. This course may be applied to the Interdisciplinary Studies major only one time. Offered as needed.
  
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    IDS 310 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    This course examines both theoretical approaches and practical applications of interdisciplinarity in today’s world, with special emphasis on the interdisciplinary research process. F, S.
  
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    IDS 311 - Interdisciplinary Program Planning Workshop (1 credit)


    (Coreq: IDS 310  must be either completed with a ‘C’ or better or taken concurrently with IDS 311) This one-credit workshop allows students to work closely with an IDS faculty member or adviser to develop their interdisciplinary program of study. Students explore their educational and career goals, along with reviewing their previous coursework, to create an individualized program of study that best suits their interests and aspirations. At the end of the course, students submit their program of study to the chair of IDS.  F, S.
  
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    IDS 333 - Interdisciplinary Nature of Careers (3 credits)


    (=UNIV 333 ) IDS/UNIV 333  will provide the student the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of operating in a consumer based economy. It will expose the student to a further understanding of the overall business environment and explore the student’s role as employee/ employer and consumer. The topics covered in the course will include a brief overview organizational, management and motivational theory, personal ethics as it applies to decision making, selecting a major and planning a career, managing change in organizations and on an individual level, innovation and creativity affecting all individuals in all organizations. F, S.
  
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    IDS 380 - Signs Among Us: The Semiotics of Culture (3 credits)


    (=COMM 380 ) A study of the signs and sign systems produced, exchanged and interpreted in contemporary culture. From toys to cuisine, from comics to video games, from plastic to astrology, the course offers critical approaches to the multiple spheres of meaning in which we move. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    IDS 385 - ‘Screens’: Communication Systems in Global Media (3 credits)


    (=CLC 385 ) Approaches to the properties and interaction of communication systems in the phenomenon of ‘screens’ — devices with global connectivity that are rapidly transforming interpersonal and intercultural communication. The course considers the origins, elements and functions of various kinds of intermodal communication as well as their scope (possibilities and limits). Topics discussed may include principles of information theory, integrated theory of communication, the notion of interface, and aspects of the semiotics of culture. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    IDS 390 - Introduction to Interdisciplinary Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: completion of ENGL 101  or equivalent with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course introduces students to academic and interdisciplinary communication skills and gives each student a chance to practice those skills. The course prepares students to write for an academic audience and emphasizes elements of academic discourse across the disciplines. The course also covers strategies for multi-modal communication (including audio and visual) in the academic environment and provides opportunities to practice these modes of communication. The course prepares students to communicate clearly and effectively to academic audiences across the disciplines. F, S.
  
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    IDS 398 - Research Methods in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    (Restricted to Interdisciplinary Studies Majors) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to principles and characteristics of approaches and methodologies relevant to research in Interdisciplinary Studies. Students will begin designing their capstone research project for IDS 499 .
  
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    IDS 399 - Directed Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: written contract between the professor and student and approved by the adviser and the dean of University College) Study of specific topics related to student’s proposed program of study as outlined in application for admission to IDS program. This course may be repeated under different topics.
  
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    IDS 495 Q - Experiential Internship (3 to 12 credits)


    The purpose of this experiential internship is designed to provide students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience that complements their interdisciplinary concentration. This course offers individuals educational experiences that bridge academic disciplines and the work place. The guided internship requires 120-480 hours of on-site work depending on the number of credits enrolled (3-12 credits). Students must work through the Internship Process established by the CCU Career Services Guidelines. This course is designed to be variable credit based on the needs of the student. Permission of adviser is necessary to enroll.
  
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    IDS 499 - Capstone Research Project in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: IDS 398 ) Capstone course required of all Interdisciplinary Studies students for graduation. Students plan and complete an original research project under the guidance and supervision of the instructor. The topic selected must be related to the student’s Interdisciplinary Studies area of emphasis. Seminar sessions focus on the principles, procedures, and problems of executing a senior-level research project. Students present project results in both written and oral form. F, S, Su.

International Engagement

  
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    INTL 301 Q - Global Ambassadors (0 credits)


    The interrelation of our myriad countries and cultures is more and more complicated but irrefutable and evolving. As a global society is best served by individuals who have a broad understanding of the world and their place in it, this course seeks to create and empower a group of dedicated student leaders as global ambassadors who will advocate for and promote global awareness and engagement programming in our community through campus engagement, action projects within the community, mentoring of fellow students, and integrated reflective learning. Pass/Fail grading only. This course may be repeated, and students must apply for and be accepted to the course.
  
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    INTL 398 Q - International Experiential Engagement (0 credits)


    (Coreq: Participation in a Study Abroad Program) This course exposes students to learning about different cultures, social institutions and languages, as well as about themselves as a member of the global community through their personalized experience in participating in a study abroad program. Students participating in this course will explore their expectations and objectives for studying abroad before departure and complete post-reflection assignments assessing their expected versus actual learning upon completion of the program. This course may be repeated.

Italian

  
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    ITAL 110 - Introductory Italian (3 credits)


    For students with no or very limited background in Italian. Emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Italian through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Development of reading and writing skills.
  
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    ITAL 115 - Italian Studies I (5 credits)


    This class introduces students to the Italian language and the many facets of Italian cultures. This course also helps students develop the basic language skills of speaking, listening, and communicating in everyday situations in Italian cultures. As a hybrid course, three credit hours are delivered face-to-face and two hours via distance learning format. F, S.
  
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    ITAL 120 - Introductory Italian II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ITAL 110  or equivalent) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Italian through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Italian culture.
  
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    ITAL 210 - Intermediate Italian I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ITAL 115  or by placement exam) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework. F, S.
  
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    ITAL 350 - Italian Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Approval of the chair of the Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures) Language study abroad with instruction by native speaking instructors. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures is mandatory before enrollment. F, S, Su.

Japanese

  
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    JAPN 110 - Introductory Japanese I (3 credits)


    For students with no or very limited background in Japanese. Emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture.
  
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    JAPN 120 - Introductory Japanese II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JAPN 110  or by placement) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture.
  
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    JAPN 130 - Introductory Japanese III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JAPN 120  or by placement) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture.
  
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    JAPN 350 - Japanese Language Study Abroad (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: JAPN 130 ) (Coreq: approval of the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program, students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the department chair of Languages and Intercultural Studies is mandatory before enrollment.

Journalism

  
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    JOUR 200 - Interactive Journalism Basics (3 credits)


    Covers the basics of journalism writing, video production and editing, and the AP Stylebook. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    JOUR 201 - Foundations of Journalism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 ) Surveys the history and principles of American journalism, including its development, philosophical foundations, products, functions, social influences, current challenges, and directions for the future. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    JOUR 304 - Writing for Interactive Journalism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 200  and JOUR 201 ) Builds on basic journalism writing skills acquired in JOUR 200  through the addition of specialty reporting skills and knowledge of interactive tools. Students practice and refine their writing skills and learn basic online reporting tools, including social media video shooting and editing. Classroom exercises emphasize proper grammar, quality writing, and multi-media storytelling. F, S, M, Su, W.
  
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    JOUR 305 - Journalism News Writing and Reporting for Media (Print and Online) (3 credits)


    (Prereq: JOUR 304 ) Workshop on news media (both in paper and web format). Emphasis placed on writing news features, hard vs. soft news pieces and profiles for audiences of both newspapers and web news venues that include photography or video links. F, S, M, Su, W.
 

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