Sep 28, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English

  
  •  

    ENGL 372 - Special Topics in Russian Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 102 ) This course will examine literature from Russia and its borderlands (including Ukraine, Central Asia and the Caucasus) with an emphasis on the interrelationships between literature, folklore, history and culture. Semesters may emphasize different regions and historical periods. This course may be repeated for credit once with a different topic. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ENGL 375 - Special Topics in World and Anglophone Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) This course extends students’ understanding of and experiences in different cultures of the world by examining issues of cross-cultural interaction and transfer of ideas between and within world cultures, historical periods, and/or literary movements. The course will also introduce students to come strategies of literary criticism and research on world authors through examination of critical texts appropriate to the topic. S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 379 - Topics in Film Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course.) Drawing from a variety of genres and styles, historical movements and production contexts, themes and national traditions, this course explores major concepts in film studies as academic discipline. Course content may privilege the work of a particular director, a movement or theme. The course consists of a 75-minute lecture/discussion session and a mandatory 2-hour screening lab each week.
  
  •  

    ENGL 382 - Contemporary Fiction (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205 ) A study of new fiction in English and other languages (in translation).
  
  •  

    ENGL 386 - Topics in Contemporary Poetry (3 credits)


    (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) A study of the poetry of a variety of contemporary American and British poets.
  
  •  

    ENGL 390 - Business and Professional Communication (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  or ENGL 101B ; and ENGL 102  or ENGL 102B ; or ENGL 290 . All with a minimum grade of ‘C’) Designed to improve practical communication, both written and oral. Students learn business style and formats (the letter, memo, resume, and report), as well as strategies for presenting neutral, negative, and persuasive messages. Students will speak on business or professional topics. F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 391 - Introduction to New Literacy Studies (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 ) This course provides an introduction to the sub-field of New Literacy Studies, with emphasis on how the discipline works in conversation with the field of Composition and Rhetoric. Students will read theoretical, pedagogical, and narrative texts to engage with questions about how we navigate multiple and layered literacies in everyday life as well as in the academy. F.
  
  •  

    ENGL 393 - Introduction to Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 ) This course provides an introduction to the concepts, tradition, and practice of rhetorical theory. Paying special attention to the relationship between rhetoric and composition, students will read a number of classical and contemporary texts in order to engage with the questions of rhetoric. F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 399 - Independent Study (3 credits)


    (Prereq: written contract between student and instructor, approved by adviser, chair of the English Department, and associate dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. Approval must be gained by the end of the semester that precedes the semester in which the independent study is undertaken.) A maximum of 12 credit hours of 399 may be applied to a B.A. degree. Courses numbered 399 may not be used to fulfill requirements for core curriculum or English core (Major). This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
  •  

    ENGL 401 - Chaucer (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A study of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, with some attention to his other major works.
  
  •  

    ENGL 404 - Topics in Non-Shakespearean Renaissance Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , or any ENGL course at the 200 level or above) This course will focus on the study of Renaissance texts in various genres, with emphasis on non-Shakespearean literatures. Readings and themes will vary by semester, but our analysis will include: the construction and representation of high and low cultures of Renaissance literature; the relationship of the literature to the specific political, intellectual, and social environments within which it was produced; the relationship of gender and authorship; and the transhistorical and transcultural influences of Renaissance literature. F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 409 - Theories of Gender and Sexuality (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 /ENGL 211  and one other 200 level ENGL class). In this course, we will explore theories that have contributed to current debates about representations of men and women, constructions of femininity and masculinity, and the implications of sexuality. The first half of the course will focus on several key essays in feminist theory. In the second half of the semester, we will explore other developments in gender and sexuality studies, including the origins of queer theory and transgender studies. The study of theoretical works will be interspersed with the application of those theories to works of literature and film. Over the course of the semester we will consider the intersections of gender with race, class, age and nationality as we examine the relevance of reading, writing, and filmmaking to our understanding of gender and sexuality.
  
  •  

    ENGL 411 - English Capstone Seminar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 300  and Senior standing) This class provides a forum for both reflection upon and assessment of the student’s experience in the major. Readings and writing assignments will focus on the discipline of English in a postgraduate context, the professional potential of the English degree, portfolio construction, and revision of existing writings for publications. The course will also include activities designed to help the department assess its program as well as the opportunity for an exit interview. F.
  
  •  

    ENGL 424 - Studies in British Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) Intensive study of topics selected by the professor teaching the course. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics with the approval of the department chair.
  
  •  

    ENGL 425 - World Dramatic Literature (3 credits)


    (=THEA 425 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A critical and historical survey of the cardinal works of dramatic literature across the epochs of theatrical performance. The course accents analysis and interpretation.
  
  •  

    ENGL 427 - Studies in Southern Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A critical study of the Twentieth-Century Southern literary tradition. The course examines regional interests shaping the emergence of a Southern literature and the distinctive characteristics of the literature, focusing especially on the writings of William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, Robert Penn Warren, and Walker Percy.
  
  •  

    ENGL 431 - New Media and Literature (3 credits)


    (=NMDC 431 ) (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or ENGL 211  and one other 200 level ENGL course) This course is required for a minor. This class will explore the future (and past) of literature in the digital age. We will begin with some historical examples of hypertext (that is, in its original meaning, text that goes “beyond” or “above” limitations of the written word) from Heraclitus, Dante, early modern broadsides, Blake and Woolf. The second part of the class will be dedicated to encounters with the literature and criticism of New Media. We will continue with some pre-professional preparation designed to make English majors aware of the changing textual landscape of their discipline.
  
  •  

    ENGL 443 - Topics in Women Writers (3 credits)


    (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course.) A study of selected works of Western and non-Western women writers.
  
  •  

    ENGL 451 - Introduction to the Study of Language and Modern Grammar (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) An introduction to the general principles concerning the design and function of human language, and an overview of the history of grammar with emphasis upon modern grammatical theory. Illustrative material is drawn from the English language, modern European languages, and others. F.
  
  •  

    ENGL 453 - Development of the English Language (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A study of the origins and development of languages in general, and of English and related languages in particular. No previous knowledge of Old and Middle English necessary. S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 454 - Psycholinguistics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A survey of selected aspects of the field focusing on the cognitive and behavioral foundations of child and adult language acquisition. Other topics may include developmental and catastrophic language disorders, neurolinguistics, and the language-thought interaction.
  
  •  

    ENGL 457 - Form and Style in Writing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A writing intensive course that focuses on the essential processes of research and writing. The course covers the details of format and matters of style for MLA, APA, and Chicago. Students receive help with every step of the process in completing their writing projects.
  
  •  

    ENGL 459 - Advanced Composition and Rhetoric (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) Writing that involves different aims, types, and audiences. Students learn theory about composition, rhetoric, and reading. Students also read examples, do library research, and review grammar, punctuation, and editing. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ENGL 462 - Fiction II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 362 , ENGL 365 , or ENGL 368 ) An advanced creative writing workshop course in which students study published contemporary short stories and create original works of short fiction. Students read and critique both published and student work. This course may be repeated one time for credit. F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 465 - Creative Nonfiction II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 362 , ENGL 365 , or ENGL 368 ) An advanced creative writing workshop course in which students study published contemporary narrative nonfiction and create original nonfiction essays. Students read and critique both published and student work. This course may be repeated one time for credit. F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 468 - Poetry II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 362 , ENGL 365 , or ENGL 368 ) An advanced creative writing workshop course in which students study published contemporary poetry and create original poems. Students read and critique both published and student work. This course may be repeated one time for credit. F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 469 - Special Topics in Creative Writing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 362 , ENGL 365 , or ENGL 368  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) An advanced creative writing workshop course in which students study published contemporary writers and create original writing in a variety of genres and subgenres. Students read and critique both published and student writing. This course may be repeated once for a total of six credit hours. F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 472 - Topics in Dramatic Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: (1) ENGL 101 , (2) ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , and (3) one other 200 level ENGL course) This course offers an intensive study of dramatic literature, drawing from a variety of styles, periods, themes, historical movements and contexts, and national traditions. Topics and themes vary by semester. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ENGL 475 - Contemporary Asian Fiction (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A critical study of works by modern and contemporary Asian fiction writers in translation in their literary, social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Drawing from one or more Asian literary traditions, this course explores issues of gender and sexuality, nationalism and colonialism, post colonialism and national trauma, responses to modernization and globalization, consumerism and popular culture, among others.
  
  •  

    ENGL 477 - Asian Cinemas (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) This course comparatively examines Asia’s cinematic traditions from the point of view of shred themes, aesthetics and cultural concerns, and in the context of past and current socio-political and cultural transformations and border-crossings. Drawing from a variety of genres and styles, historical movements and production contexts, this course may explore issues of gender and sexuality, nationalism and colonialism, post colonialism and national trauma, responses to modernization and globalization, consumerism and popular culture. The course consists of a 75-minute lecture/discussion session and a mandatory 2-hour screening lab each week.
  
  •  

    ENGL 479 - Studies in Modern and Contemporary British and Anglophone Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or ENGL 211 , and one other 200 level ENGL class) This course will explore the impact of globalization on literature and film of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will read contemporary Anglophone and British novels and view some films, each of which has gained prominence by winning prizes, selling widely, or achieving critical acclaim. Together we will investigate how these narratives from diverse cultures respond to and participate in increasingly globalized international system. Are different cultural traditions and narratives being homogenized into a standard format, or is new diversity being introduced through evolving uses of the English language, unfamiliar themes, and new ways of telling stories?
  
  •  

    ENGL 480 - Special Topics in Technical Communications (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of ENGL 210 and ENGL 211  with a grade of ‘B’ or better, and ENGL 212 and ARTD 201 ; junior standing) An intensive workshop focusing on a specific topic in technical communication. Topics will vary and may include Computer Documentation (hardware and software, including user guides, reference manuals, quick reference guides, tutorials, and online documentation); Grant/Proposal Writing; Scientific/Medical Writing; Hypermedia authoring. This course may be repeated for academic credit. F.
  
  •  

    ENGL 483 - Theory of Literary Criticism (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) A study of various theories of literary criticism as applied to the major genres (fiction, poetry, and drama) with the aim of establishing standards of judgment.
  
  •  

    ENGL 484 - Children’s Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  or ENGL 101B  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, or ENGL 205  with a grade of ‘C’ or better) This course is designed to introduce you to the study of works appropriate for the elementary and middle school child.
  
  •  

    ENGL 485 - Adolescent Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) An extensive study of works appropriate for the adolescent. Required of all Secondary English Education students.
  
  •  

    ENGL 487 - Literary Studies in Health, Illness, and Aging (3 credits)


    (Prereq: one literature class at the 200 level or above or permission of the instructor) This course will offer students an opportunity to read, think, and write about literary texts that engage with the implications of human embodiment. Readings and thematic focus will vary by semester, and may incorporate a range of geographical locations, historical periods, and literary genres. Through reading and discussion students will consider how categories like health and illness, youth and age, or ability and disability are depicted and sometimes challenged in literary texts, and will examine how illness or disability might affect the constitution of identity, enabling new kinds of stories and new ways of telling them. Alternating F, S.
  
  •  

    ENGL 488 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) Intensive study of topics selected by the professor teaching this course. This course may be repeated and used for English credit with the approval of the department chair.
  
  •  

    ENGL 489 - Gender and Sexuality in Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing). Course employs feminist principles, philosophies, and pedagogies, to examine literary and/or theoretical treatments of gender and sexuality. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include issues such as sexual identity, queer theory, feminist criticism, and masculinity studies.
  
  •  

    ENGL 495 - Internship for English Majors (3 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 , a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) Three credit hours may be applied toward the English major. Students will receive instruction and gain professional experience in an internship while working at least 10 hours per week with a local business or organization. Course contract must be approved prior to registration.
  
  •  

    ENGL 496 - Senior Thesis in English (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 300  A, B) Students will design and execute an original research project with the guidance, support and oversight of the class instructor. Students are encouraged to choose a research mentor from among the full-time faculty in the Department of English, but the final evaluation of the project is the responsibility of the course instructor. Students will publicly present their projects at the conclusion of the course.
  
  •  

    ENGL 497 - Special Topics: Literature, Language, Location (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) Course Restrictions: Students will take course as part of approved Coastal Carolina University travel/study programs. Course is a selective. Students will undertake the study of literature and/or the English language in the context of significant national or international travel. Under the guidance of faculty experienced in external study, and taking advantage of site-specific resources, students will explore how direct knowledge of place can lead to insight into the literary and cultural productions of a civilization. Most often, students will study primary texts before travel, and the most common itineraries will include visits to libraries, museums, historic landmarks and locations of cultural significance.
  
  •  

    ENGL 499 - Studies in American Literature (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  with a grade of ‘C’ or better, a grade of ‘C’ or better in one other ENGL course, and junior standing) Intensive study of topics selected by the professor teaching the course. This course may be repeated with the approval of the department chair.

Environmental Science

  
  •  

    ENVI 201 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3 credits)


    (Prereq: BIOL 121 , BIOL 122 , CHEM 112 , or MSCI 112 ) (Coreq: ENVI 201L ) The course brings together fundamental scientific disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics, geology and oceanography) in a cogent, multidisciplinary approach to investigate the interaction of human activity and the environment. The lab consists of two 7-week modules that focus on the environment of a specific geographic region. Each week a different component of that system is examined. Three lecture hours per week. S.
  
  •  

    ENVI 201L - Introduction to Environmental Science Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: ENVI 201 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in lecture. Three laboratory hours per week. S.
  
  •  

    ENVI 331 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 331 ) (Prereq: One Computer course and one Statistics course and MATH 160 ) (Coreq: ENVI 331L ) An introduction to the fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing. Using a database tied to particular geographic coordinates, a GIS is an automated system for storing, transforming, analyzing and displaying spatial data. This course discusses input methods, data storage, data accuracy, data models, types of query and analysis, and map output. Each student designs, conducts and presents a semester research project. Three lecture hours per week. F.
  
  •  

    ENVI 331L - Introduction to Geographic information Systems Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 331L ) (Coreq: ENVI 331 ) This laboratory demonstrates the techniques and principles presented in ENVI 331 . It introduces students to GIS computer software and the collection, entry, storage, query, analysis and presentation of spatial data. F.
  
  •  

    ENVI 399 - Independent Study/Internship (1 to 4 credits)


    (Prereq: A contract must be approved by the instructor and the department chair by the time of registration) Directed study of specific topics or supervised work as part of an approved off-campus internship. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    ENVI 420 - Advanced Environmental Science (3 credits)


    (=MSCI 420 ) (Prereq: BIOL 122 , MATH 160 , CHEM 112  and PHYS 201  or PHYS 211 ) (Coreq: ENVI 420L ) Students actively investigate the earth system along with current environmental issues. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the many subsystems that comprise the earth system. Environmental issues are scientifically explored in an effort to develop sustainable solutions. The lab is project oriented, including both a local environmental study and a global remote sensing study. S.
  
  •  

    ENVI 420L - Advanced Environmental Science Laboratory (1 credit)


    (=MSCI 420L ) (Coreq: ENVI 420 ) The laboratory demonstrates the topics and principles presented in the lecture. S.
  
  •  

    ENVI 486 - Apex Predators and Other Endangered Wildlife (3 credits)


    (=BIOL 486 ) Apex predators like sharks, lions, tigers, wolves, crocodiles, bears, eagles, dolphins and other animals all play important ecological roles, and many are also endangered by human activities. This course covers aspects of the life histories, ecology, and conservation biology of this diverse group. Classes will be supplemented by field trips to aquaria, nature parks, and/or wildlife preserves. There is a course fee for this course, and potential additional entrance fees. S.
  
  •  

    ENVI 487 - Selected Topics in Environmental Science (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: ENVI 201  and permission of the instructor) These topics are designed to allow the development of seminars and courses in special areas of environmental science. Offered as needed.
  
  •  

    ENVI 499 - Directed Undergraduate Research (3 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: A contract must be approved by the instructor and the department chair by the time of registration) Structured undergraduate research projects conducted with faculty direction and participation, or within the context of an approved off-campus internship. Projects explore environmental problems using the scientific method. One conference and no less than five laboratory or field research hours per week. F, S, Su.

Exercise and Sport Science

  
  •  

    EXSS 122 - Lifetime Fitness and Physical Activity (3 credits)


    Basic concepts, components, and skills of lifetime personal fitness and physical activity. Emphasis placed on behavior change through participation in all physical fitness components, utilization of fitness tools/technology, and the application of essential concepts. Provides the knowledge and skills to plan, evaluate, and achieve and adhere to a personalized program of fitness. Course includes topics of nutrition, weight and stress management, and disease prevention related to lifetime fitness and health.
  
  •  

    EXSS 205 - Introduction to Exercise and Sport Science (3 credits)


    Course provides an introduction and overview of the multidisciplinary field of exercise and sport science. The importance of specialized areas of study such as exercise physiology, biomechanics, exercise/sport psychology, motor behavior, fitness management, and nutrition for optimal health and physical performance will be highlighted. Course also provides an overview of the exercise and sport science program as well as career perspectives within the field.
  
  •  

    EXSS 310 - Exercise and Sport Nutrition (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in PUBH 121  or EXSS 122 ) Investigates the basic, scientific, and applied concepts of nutrition and substrate utilization as they apply to energy production for exercise, body composition, weight control and thermoregulation. Emphasis given to analyzing nutritional behaviors for enhanced exercise and sport performance. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 330 - Injury Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in KRSS 222 ) Modern fundamental principles and practices in the prevention, treatment, and care of fitness and sport-related injuries. Administrative and legal issues related to injury management also covered. Course also provides emergency first aid and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification. F, S.
  
  •  

    EXSS 340 - Sport and Exercise Behavior (3 credits)


    (Prereq: sophomore standing) An overview of basic concepts and principles essential to understanding the psychological and behavioral aspects of sport and exercise. Emphasis is given to the conceptual frameworks and the applied aspects of sport performance enhancement and mental skills, exercise behavior and motivation, sociological factors, and health and well-being. Applications are made to future practitioners of coaching, teaching, sports medicine, counseling, sport management, and fitness instruction. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 350 - Exercise Physiology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in BIOL 232 /BIOL 232L  and BIOL 242 /BIOL 242L ) (Coreq: EXSS 350L ) This course provides an overview of exercise physiology theory and principles and an examination of the physiological responses to both acute and chronic physical activity. The impact of environment, supplements, detraining and overtraining on physiological responses to exercise will also be highlighted. Finally, various techniques utilized to assess physiological responses to exercise will also be discussed. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 350L - Laboratory in Exercise Physiology (1 credit)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in BIOL 232 /BIOL 232L  and BIOL 242 /BIOL 242L ) (Coreq: EXSS 350 ) An applied course that reinforces the basic principles and skills learned in exercise physiology lecture (EXSS 350 ). Emphasis placed on the collection of real data and the generation of scientific lab reports. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 360 - Motor Behavior (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 205  or EDPE 290 ) (Coreq: EXSS 360L ) A study of the development (maturation and growth), acquisition, retention, and transfer of motor skills and behavior throughout the lifespan. Emphasis given to the underlying processes in the control, learning, and performance of motor skills. As a foundation course for motor skill practitioners working with a variety of ages and populations, the content blends principles of motor learning/control, motor development, and sport psychology. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 360L - Laboratory in Motor Behavior (1 credit)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 205  or EDPE 290 ) (Coreq: EXSS 360 ) An applied course that reinforces the basic concepts, principles, and research learned in motor behavior lecture (EXSS 360 ). The course includes participation in laboratory and field-based experiments, collection and analysis of data, the generation of scientific lab reports, and applications to real-world instructional settings. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 385 - Exercise Testing and Prescription (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L ) (Coreq: EXSS 385L ) An overview of methods utilized to assess health-related components of physical fitness and develop basic exercise prescriptions. This course will cover aspects such as obtaining health histories and informed consent, selecting and conducting proper fitness assessments, and utilizing results to develop appropriate exercise prescriptions. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 385L - Laboratory in Exercise Testing and Prescription (1 credit)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L ) (Coreq: EXSS 385 ) An applied course that reinforces the basic principles and skills learned in Exercise Testing and Prescription (EXSS 385 ). Emphasis placed on the proper techniques associated with assessing health-related components of physical fitness for the development of appropriate exercise prescriptions for individuals/clients. Course may be taken two times for academic credit. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 390 - Strength and Conditioning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L ) Course provides an overview of concepts and techniques utilized to enhance muscle strength and endurance. Basic muscle function and anatomy is reviewed, as well as how muscle responds to training, detraining, and overtraining. Emphasis placed on the enhancement of sport performance and the bridging of theory to practice. Course also covers the risks associated with various forms of resistance training as well as how to reduce these risks. Certification opportunities provided.
  
  •  

    EXSS 399 - Independent Study in Exercise and Sport Science (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: EXSS 205  and approved written contract between student, instructor, and department chair) A faculty-supervised learning experience within the Smith Exercise Science Laboratory. Students will apply foundational knowledge and develop skills and abilities through individualized coursework. Examples of activities include assisting faculty members with on-going research projects or completing in-depth study of exercise science-related special topics.
  
  •  

    EXSS 400 - Biomechanics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: BIOL 232 /BIOL 232L  and MATH 131  or above, all with a grade of ‘C’ or better) Examines the anatomical and mechanical bases for human movement as they relate to exercise, physical activity, and sport. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    EXSS 401 - Psychology of Sport-Related Injury (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 340 ) This course explores the influences of psychological factors on the risk of sports injury. Additionally, adverse behavioral and emotional responses of injured athletes are identified and analyzed. Integrating the knowledge of psychological interventions to the rehabilitation setting are explored. Finally, relevant research associated with the topic of psychology of sports injury are synthesized and discussed. S.
  
  •  

    EXSS 405 - Exercise Testing and Prescription for Diverse Populations (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L  and EXSS 385 /EXSS 385L ) Course covers exercise testing procedures and exercise prescription for a diverse range of populations including children, adolescents, older individuals, and individuals with chronic conditions such as cancer, human immunodeficiency virus, and osteoarthritis. An emphasis is placed on screening individuals for abnormal responses and contraindications to exercise as well as methods for modifying exercise prescriptions based on individual needs.
  
  •  

    EXSS 410 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L ) Course covers the underlying mechanisms of prevalent cardiopulmonary diseases such as coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, asthma, and emphysema, as well as the impact conditions such as these have on overall functional capacity. The importance of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of these conditions is highlighted. Current medical and surgical techniques utilized to treat cardiopulmonary diseases are also discussed.
  
  •  

    EXSS 415 - Personal Fitness Leadership (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L  and EXSS 385 /EXSS 385L ) Course builds on foundational content to develop the knowledge, skills and abilities related to prescribing exercise and demonstrating proper utilization of exercise equipment and techniques for enhancement of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness. The course provides a focus on leadership and communication principles and administrative issues related to personal training and group fitness leadership.
  
  •  

    EXSS 420 - Exercise and Aging (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L ) The physiological and structural changes that occur as a result of aging, and how these changes may impact one’s ability to perform physical activity. The benefits of physical activity for older populations will also be examined, as well as psychosocial issues related to exercise for the elderly.
  
  •  

    EXSS 450 - Laboratory Skills in Exercise Science (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in EXSS 350 /EXSS 350L ) Designed for students with at least one course in exercise physiology. Students become proficient in the use of the laboratory equipment currently available in the field and in the Exercise Science Laboratory. Students gain experience with data collection in a wide variety of pilot research experiments.
  
  •  

    EXSS 490 - Seminar in Exercise and Sport Science (1 credit)


    (Prereq: EXSS Major and Senior Standing) Course prepares the EXSS major for internship in exercise and sport science. Students analyze career placement opportunities; seek and communicate with potential internship sites, explore the internship process, and complete associated program and professional development requirements. F, S.
  
  •  

    EXSS 495 Q - Internship in Exercise and Sport Science (9 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: Admission to Internship: 1, ‘C’ or better in all exercise and sport science major requirements, 2.25 cumulative GPA or higher at Coastal Carolina University, completion of all required Exercise and Sport Science coursework, and Adviser/Program Approval) Students gain opportunities to apply and further develop their knowledge, skills, and abilities through full-time, supervised experiences (350-450 hours). Students will perform full-time internships in approved exercise or sport science-related facilities such as hospitals, fitness centers, or physical therapy/rehabilitation clinics.
  
  •  

    EXSS 499 - Directed Undergraduate Research in Exercise and Sport Science (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: EXSS 205  and approved written contract between student, instructor, and department chair) A faculty-supervised research project within exercise and sport science. Students develop skills and abilities of research through the completion of an approved project. Projects are developed with a faculty member and approved with a written contract and specific requirements.

Finance

  
  •  

    FIN 301 - Business Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in: ECON 201 , CBAD 201 , CBAD 291  or STAT 201 , MATH 131  or MATH 132 ) Theoretical foundation of optimal financial policy with an emphasis on working capital, capital budgeting, financing, and dividend decisions and how they affect the valuation of the firm. F, S, Su.
  
  •  

    FIN 302 - Survey of Commercial and Investment Real Estate (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 , or a grade of ‘C’ or better in ECON 101 ; a grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 363  or FIN 301 ) An international study of real estate from a commercial and investment perspective. The international nature of the course requires attention to topics including global ethics, cultural diversity, legal, and economic aspects as they vary across the globe and impact real estate. Theoretical grounding in urban and institutional economics motivates the study. Fundamental methods of financial valuation of real estate are explored and analyzed with an international backdrop.
  
  •  

    FIN 400 - Financial Industry Exam Preparation (0 to 3 credits)


    This is an exam preparation course covering topics related to the General Securities Registered Representative Exam (Series 7). This course will expose students to topics currently covered by the Series 7 examination including (but not limited to) corporate, equity/fixed-income securities, local/state/federal government, securities, derivative securities, and investment company products. This course is not affiliated with FINRA, the Series 7, exam provider, and does not exempt students from the examination eligibility requirements. Pass/Fail grading only. This course may be repeated for up to six credits. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 401 - Corporate Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Financial theory and techniques for the analysis and solution of financial problems dealing with acquisition of funds, topics include capital structure, cost of capital, dividend policy, and valuation. The case method and computer simulation is utilized. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 402 - Investment Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Financial theory and techniques for overall investment analysis. Conceptual and analytical framework for formulating investment policies and analyzing securities. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 403 - Financial Institutions and Markets (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Principal institutions and markets comprising the financial system; their roles in short-term, long-term and equity financing, interest rate determination and capital formation; interrelationships between domestic and international financial markets; government policy objectives and regulations as influences on the financial system. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 404 - Business and Financial Analysis (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) The analysis of the profitability and viability of a commercial enterprise. Primary focus given to the analysis of a firm’s accounting practices and financial statements from the framework of overall business analysis. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 421 - Multinational Corporate Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301  or CBAD 363 ) Analysis of institutions and practices unique to the financial management of multinational business enterprises. All aspects of international financial management are covered with a concentration on the corporate form and the increasing importance of global integration of money and capital markets. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 441 - Financial Derivatives (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) This course is designed as an introduction to risk management and derivatives. The course employs practical applications to introduce students to the risk management process. The course will provide an introduction to the following topics: option and futures basics, derivatives securities markets, valuation of derivatives, derivative trading strategies, the management of corporate risk, and an overview of the use of derivatives in accounting. F.
  
  •  

    FIN 442 - Retirement and Estate Planning (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) In-depth coverage of money management concepts and practices necessary for intelligent control over personal income and expenditures, topics include introduction to financial planning, risk management, investment management, tax planning and management, retirement planning and employee benefits, and estate planning. Utilizes case analyses. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 462 - Real Estate Finance and Investment (3 credits)


    (=HRTM 467 ) (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301  or CBAD 363 ) Principles and practices in real estate finance focusing on institutions, instruments, and determinants of terms and availability of credit, topics include interest and yield mechanics, cash flow analysis, risk analysis, and various loan strategies or packages.
  
  •  

    FIN 463 - Risk Management and Insurance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 301 ) Introduction to the concepts of risk and its management through the use of insurance. The student will become familiar with different types of risks and the solutions that are delivered by various organizations. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 491 - Advanced Corporate Finance (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 401 ) In-depth coverage of advanced topics in corporate financial management using computer simulations and dynamic multi period case studies. Long-and short-term corporate financial policy formation is examined against the backdrop of firm value maximization and the market for corporate control. Special consideration is given to mergers, acquisitions, and corporate restructuring. SEC reporting requirements and formats are integrated throughout. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 492 - Portfolio Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 402 ) Conceptual and analytical framework for formulating investment policies and constructing portfolios. This is the capstone course for the Wealth Management Concentration. Special topics may be introduced. F, S.
  
  •  

    FIN 493 - Financial Institutions Management (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in FIN 403 ) In-depth coverage of financial institutions management with an emphasis on depository institutions. A bank management computer simulation is integrated throughout the course as a dynamic multi-period case. The simulation provides a unique opportunity for students to practice depository institutions management techniques in an environment in which earlier decisions impact latter decisions. In addition to managing a simulated bank, the student will conduct financial analysis on other banks in the simulation industry. The course material includes current readings from various business publications. S.
  
  •  

    FIN 497 - Finance Internship (0 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: 54 or more hours, minimum GPA of 2.5, and approval of the department chair) The Finance Internship is a supervised work experience in a financial setting. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to maintain a detailed journal relative to their workplace activities, establish specific learning goals, complete a reflective essay regarding the experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of sixty (60) hours in the internship environment per credit hour earned. Students may receive from zero to twelve (0-12) credit hours for the Finance Internship course, which may be repeated up to three (3) times for credit; however, students cannot earn more than a total of twelve (12) finance internship credit hours over the course of a single undergraduate program and only six (6) credit hours may be applied toward the minimum credit hours required for a single Coastal Carolina University degree. F, S, Su.

French

  
  •  

    FREN 110 - Introductory French I (3 credits)


    Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 111 - Introductory French I-II (3 credits)


    (Intensive) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, Equivalent to FREN 110 -FREN 120 . Intended for students with two years of high school French with an average grade of ‘B’ or better, or by placement.
  
  •  

    FREN 115 - French Studies I (5 credits)


    This class introduces students to the French language and the many facets of French culture. This course also helps students develop the basic skills of speaking, listening, and communicating in everyday situations in French culture. As a hybrid course, this course will deliver three credit hours face-to-face and two hours via a distance learning format. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 120 - Introductory French II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 110  or by placement) A continuation of FREN 110 . Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 210 - Intermediate French Language and Culture I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 115  or FREN 120  or by placement exam) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework, with particular emphasis on reading. F, S.
  
  •  

    FREN 220 - Intermediate French Language and Culture II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: FREN 210 ) Intensive review of fundamental language skills and preview of advanced level skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework, with particular emphasis on reading.
  
  •  

    FREN 225 - French Conversation I (1 credit)


    Intensive practice in intermediate spoken French.
  
  •  

    FREN 250 - French Literature in Translation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ENGL 101 ) Selected readings of French literature from the Middle Ages to the Modern Era in Translation. Discussion and analysis of a variety of texts, including prose, drama, and poetry, and consideration of their cultural and historical backgrounds. Work for the class includes reading assignments, short critical essays, and comparative studies of the works read.
  
  •  

    FREN 270 - Introduction to French and Francophone Culture (3 credits)


    A general introduction to French and Francophone society and culture for intermediate level students. Intensive practice in spoken and written French with special emphasis on increased cultural understanding. F.
 

Page: 1 <- 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13Forward 10 -> 22