Mar 29, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Academic Coaching Experience

  
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    ACED 101 - Academic Strategy Development (0 credits)


    This action-orientated, skill-based course is designed to assist students in developing a better understanding of their individualized academic and personal areas of strength and challenge and develop the skills and strategies necessary to improve their academic and personal performance. Critical skill development covered in this course include, but are not limited to, course assessment, reflection and self-regulation. F, S.

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 330 - Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 201  and CBAD 202 ) Theoretical foundation of generally accepted accounting principles, review of the accounting cycle leading to preparation of financial statements, accounting recognition of assets with special emphasis on cash, receivables, inventories, property, plant and equipment, and the time value of money. F, S, May.
  
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    ACCT 331 - Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ACCT 330 ) Accounting recognition of depreciable assets, intangible assets, investments, current liabilities, long-term liabilities. Stockholders equity topics and accounting theory underlying revenue recognition. F, S, Su.
  
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    ACCT 332 - Intermediate Accounting III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ACCT 331 ) Advanced financial accounting topics including earnings per share, leases, pensions, accounting for income taxes, preparation of cash flow statements, and financial statement analysis. Partnership accounting topics include formation, operation, and liquidation. F, S, Su.
  
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    ACCT 333 - Cost Accounting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 202 ) Cost accounting for manufacturing operations topics include: cost-volume profit analysis; job-order, process, and standard costing; budgeting; and decision making under uncertainty. F, S, Su.
  
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    ACCT 336 - Accounting Systems and Data Processing (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CSCI 110  or equivalent). Accounting systems as collector and processor of data necessary for effective control of a business organization. Emphasis on electronic data processing and data base management. F, S, Su.
  
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    ACCT 339 - Individual Income Taxation (3 credits)


    (Prereq: Completion of 54 semester hours) Introduction to sources of income tax law, basic concepts, property transactions, and research with consideration of filing status, exemptions, gross income, deductions, and computations leading to preparation of individual tax returns. F, S, Su.
  
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    ACCT 433 - Governmental Accounting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ACCT 330 ) Accounting techniques for governmental and not-for-profit entities; topics include accounting standards and procedures for governmental units, colleges and universities, and voluntary health and welfare organizations.
  
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    ACCT 434 - Controllership (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ACCT 331 , ACCT 333 , and FIN 301 ) A capstone course designed primarily for accounting and finance majors who are interested in pursuing a career in industry. CMA/CFA examination topics include controller responsibilities, advanced cost techniques, strategic planning and budgeting, and tax issues other than income tax. S.
  
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    ACCT 435 - Advanced Accounting (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ACCT 332 , or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 332 ) Financial accounting for investments in stock and consolidation, foreign currency transactions and translation of financial statements.
  
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    ACCT 437 - Auditing Theory (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in CBAD 291  and ACCT 333 ) (Coreq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ACCT 331  or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 331 ) Generally accepted auditing standards governing external financial audits, audit techniques and procedures, evaluation of internal control system and the audit opinion. F, S, Su.
  
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    ACCT 439 - Income Taxation for Business Entities (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ACCT 339 ). Introduction to the income taxation of business entities, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Basic concepts of the federal income tax system…gross income, business deductions, property transactions, comparison of business entities…online tax research and tax return preparation. F, S, Su.
  
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    ACCT 441 - VITA Independent Study (1 to 2 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘B’ or better in ACCT 339  or participant in prior year VITA program.) Emphasizes supervisory role in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program (VITA). Students will be involved in assisting student tax preparers and taxpayers with “real world” tax preparation issues providing a diverse learning experience.
  
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    ACCT 483 - Current CPA Topics (3 credits)


    (Prereq: A grade of ‘C’ or better in ACCT 330 , ACCT 331 , ACCT 332 , ACCT 333 , ACCT 336 , ACCT 339 , ACCT 437 , and ACCT 439 ) This course is designed to provide a review of the major topics on the CPA exam. Students will be involved in an intensive review of CPA exam topics and take a battery of diagnostic exams on the topics to measure their level of competency in each area.
  
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    ACCT 497 - Accounting Internship (0 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: 54 or more hours, minimum GPA of 2.5, and approval of the department chair) The accounting internship is a supervised work experience in an accounting setting. The specific work environment and student’s job responsibilities must be approved, in advance, by supervising faculty. Students will be required to maintain a detailed journal relative to their workplace activities, establish specific learning goals, complete a reflective essay regarding the experience, and will be evaluated by their workplace supervisor. Students must work a minimum of sixty (60) hours in the internship environment per credit hour earned. Students may receive from 0-12 credit hours for the accounting internship course, which may be repeated up to three times for credit; however, students cannot earn more than a total of 12 accounting internship credit hours over the course of a single undergraduate program and only six credit hours may be applied toward the minimum credit hours required for a single Coastal Carolina University degree. F, S, Su.

American Studies

  
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    AMST 300 - The American Experience (3 credits)


    This is the core course for students pursuing a minor or certificate in American Studies. This course introduces students to concepts and methodologies in the field of American Studies through the study of American society and culture. The course examines competing conceptualizations of America and American identity and how these competing ideals shape the ethos of the United States. F, S, M, Su.
  
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    AMST 301 - American Studies - Domestic Political Issues (3 credits)


    This hybrid course involves both an online component and attendance at six Saturday sessions. The first sessions introduces the course, the next four feature guest lectures, and the final session provides an opportunity for student presentations. AMST 301 focuses on American politics - domestic issues, with the topics changing each time the course is offered. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours when taking different topics. F.
  
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    AMST 302 - American Studies - Foreign Policy (3 credits)


    This hybrid course involves both an online component and attendance at six Saturday sessions. The first sessions introduces the course, the next four feature guest lectures, and the final session provides an opportunity for student presentations. AMST 302 leads students in an in-depth analysis of four pressing foreign policy issues affecting the United States today. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours when taking different topics. S.
  
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    AMST 303 - American Studies - Literature and/or Art (3 credits)


    This hybrid course involves both an online component and attendance at six Saturday sessions. The first sessions introduces the course, the next four feature guest lectures, and the final session provides an opportunity for student presentations. AMST 303, which focuses on different topics in the realm of American art and literature, helps students develop skills of visual and verbal analysis. Su.
  
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    AMST 304 - American Studies - Music and/or Theatre (3 credits)


    This hybrid course involves both an online component and attendance at six Saturday sessions. The first sessions introduces the course, the next four feature guest lectures, and the final session provides an opportunity for student presentations. AMST 304, which focuses on different topics in the realm of American music and theatre, acquaints students with the history and cultural significance of American fine arts and helps students develop skills of visual and verbal analysis. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours when taking different topics. Su.
  
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    AMST 305 - American Studies - Popular Culture (3 credits)


    This hybrid course involves both an online component and attendance at six Saturday sessions. The first sessions introduces the course, the next four feature guest lectures, and the final session provides an opportunity for student presentations. AMST 305, which focuses on different topics in the realm of American popular culture, helps students develop skills of visual and verbal analysis. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours when taking different topics. F, Su.
  
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    AMST 306 - American Studies - History and/or Social Issues (3 credits)


    This hybrid course involves both an online component and attendance at six Saturday sessions. The first sessions introduces the course, the next four feature guest lectures, and the final session provides an opportunity for student presentations. AMST 306 focuses on American history or American social issues, with the topics changing each time the course is offered. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours when taking different topics. F.
  
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    AMST 307 - American Studies - Cultural Eras (3 credits)


    This hybrid course involves both an online component and attendance at six Saturday sessions. The first sessions introduces the course, the next four feature guest lectures, and the final session provides an opportunity for student presentations. AMST 307 helps students understand the political, social, and economic forces that shaped American culture during a particular decade. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours when taking different topics. F.

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 101 - Primates, People and Prehistory (3 credits)


    (Coreq: ANTH 101L ) An exploration of human origins, human evolution, human prehistory and cultural existence from its less complex forms to early civilizations. An introduction to the concepts, methods and data of physical, biological and archaeological anthropology.
  
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    ANTH 101L - Primates, People and Prehistory Laboratory (1 credit)


    (Coreq: ANTH 101 ) Through laboratory exercises, students will explore human biology and culture over a period of several million years. Students will question the nature of science, the use and analysis of scientific evidence, and how biocultural evolution worked in the past and how it works today. Focusing on the “how” aspect of these questions, students draw on scientific processes and knowledge to learn about what we are and how we came to be.
  
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    ANTH 102 - Understanding Other Cultures (3 credits)


    An exploration and comparison of selected contemporary cultures, including their languages. An introduction to the concepts, methods and data of sociocultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 120 - Cultures and Environments (3 credits)


    (GEOG 120 ) This course will introduce students to intersections between people and the world around them. We will explore the ways in which the environment shapes human cultures, how cultures adapt and change the environment, and the feedback loops that are created in an anthropogenic landscape. We will use case studies to illustrate these theories and discuss how our perspectives inform our understanding and interpretation of environments and human cultures, both past and present. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 150 - World’s Greatest Shipwrecks (3 credits)


    Excavation and exploration of ships and boats dating from 5,000 years ago in ancient Egypt to U.S.S. Yorktown of World War II provide an introduction to the fields of archaeology and anthropology for students with little background in archaeology. From Titanic to treasure ships, this global survey explores archaeology, economy, technology and society at an introductory level.
  
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    ANTH 210 - World Prehistory (3 credits)


    This introduction to world prehistory covers nearly four million years of human biological and cultural change around the world, from a time when people depended on stone tools through development of complex societies that relied on bureaucrats to maintain and administer state policies. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 300 - Human Landscapes (3 credits)


    (=GEOG 300 ) (Prereq: ANTH 120  or GEOG 120 ) This course intensively examines the way in which anthropologists and geographers use landscape analysis in studies of the interaction between people and their environment. We will discuss the formation of anthropogenic landscapes and feedback cycles, and the way in which this affects human behaviors past and present. Case studies can include agriculture, climate change, pollution, population, urbanization, and the Anthropocene. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 301 - Anthropological Theory (3 credits)


    This course will provide an overview of the major theoretical approaches in anthropology. These include a wide range of perspectives such as evolutionary, functionalist, structuralist, and postmodernist, among others. The class will take a chronological approach in order to explore the development of schools of thought through time. We will use case studies to illustrate these theories and discuss how our perspectives inform our understanding and interpretation of human cultures and environments, both past and present. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 303 - Murder, Mayhem & Madness: Culture & Crime (3 credits)


    This course is an anthropological exploration of cultural attitudes and influences on homicide, public execution and/or torture of criminals and treatment of the “criminally insane.” This course will include the study of serial and mass murderers and may include case studies from the ancient world to modern society. Examples will be viewed through the lens of cultural and historical contexts, gender and age roles, class differentiation and utilize interdisciplinary sources for a holistic approach. Popular culture, media, and violence in identity formation will also be addressed. F.
  
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    ANTH 310 - Myth, Ritual and Magic (3 credits)


    This is an anthropological course that will examine ancient & historical cultures’ supernatural beliefs, ritual practices, and mystical symbolism, and how these reflect societies’ values and world views about power, gender, and identity. Topics will include: “goddess” cults, witchcraft, spirits/demons, shamans, divination, sacrifice, magic, and cult objects. We will approach these topics through the study of folklore, mythology, historical, and archaeological evidence.
  
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    ANTH 311 - Global Musics and Cultures (3 credits)


    Music performance offers a unique, yet crucial site for interrogating the underlying social values and systems of meanings of a society. Through music, conceptualizations of race, class, gender, and other identities are constructed, contested, and displayed. This course examines diverse musical practices from around the world. From an ethnomusicological perspective, we will explore music as a complex enactment and symbol of culture within which and through which artistic, economic, political and other social values are crafted. FORMAL TRAINING IN MUSIC IS NOT REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 312 - World Ethnography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ANTH 102  or permission of the instructor) This course defines ethnography from an anthropological perspective and presents the foundations for studying human cultures holistically, empirically, and historically. Ethnography is the study of a human culture and includes examination of social roles and relationship dynamics, subsistence/economy, customs, political climate, religion, etc. Discussions will also examine the use and misuse of ethnographic information. This course will explore various styles of ethnography through anthropological case studies and will draw from rural and urban communities and populations from around the world.
  
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    ANTH 313 - Food, Identity and Migration (3 credits)


    Food is a crucial aspect of every society because it serves as a source of nourishment as well as code for understanding histories and embedded values. Whether we plant our own crops or obtain them from distant lands, eat alone or with large extended families, use knives and forks or eat with our hands, the way we produce and consume food speak to our values, history, and our identities. In this course we will explore food as a substance as well as a symbol of multiple, overlapping, and sometimes conflicting identities, such as race, class, gender, and religion. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 314 - Survey of African American Musics (3 credits)


    Music has been a crucial facet of the daily experiences of African Americans even before the advent of the Atlantic Slave Trade. Whether they were playing games, working on plantations, marching for civil rights, or engaging in religious worship, African Americans created and utilized music to facilitate the successful execution of these activities and many others. This course examines the factors that influence the creation and propagation of diverse styles (genres) of African American musics. Formal training in music is not required for this course. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 315 - The Caribbean (3 credits)


    The Caribbean region is comprised of islands, such as Bahamas and Trinidad, and continental regions, including Belize, Suriname, and Guyana. The Caribbean is culturally diverse, consisting of peoples from various regions of the world, including China, India, and West Africa. This course explores the history, development, and “culture” of the Caribbean by interrogating how the intersections of various forces-including slavery, colonialism, politics, music, and migration-shaped the region. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 316 - Sex, Gender & Culture (3 credits)


    Sex, gender, and culture are closely interwoven in society and define the parameters of our identities. By taking a uniquely anthropological approach, this course examines how sex and gender are a part of human culture. This course uses anthropological case studies from around the world to explore the ways in which social conventions are maintained, manipulated, and challenged, and how they influence our perceptions of ourselves and others.
  
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    ANTH 317 Q - Gullah Culture and Identity (3 credits)


    Understanding the Gullah (Geechee) community is crucial to understanding ethnic identity construction in the United States, particularly in the South. This course examines the culture and identity of Gullah (Geechee) culture in the United States by exploring issues and concepts pertaining to African retentions, creolization, and hybridity. It specifically interrogates how historical developments, such as Slavery, rice farming, and isolation from mainland USA gave rise to the Gullah (Geechee) culture. We will also explore the connections between Africa (particularly West Africa), the Caribbean, and Gullah (Geechee) culture by exploring linguistic practices, foodways, folk rituals, gender, and spiritual beliefs. Ultimately, this course will enable students to engage in experiential learning by allowing them to use anthropological research methods and skills to conduct ethnographic research in the Gullah (Geechee) community. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 318 - Topics in Ethnic Identity (3 credits)


    This course will draw on anthropological methods and theories to examine the ways that individuals and groups negotiate ethnic identities through their use of cultural symbols such as language, music, flags, and attire. Topics may include rituals and festivals of the African diaspora; global musics and cultures; and food identity and migration. This course may be repeated under different topics for up to nine credit hours. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 320 - Archaeology and the Human Past (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ANTH 101 ) An introduction to archaeological research. Archaeological theory and methods in the context of prehistoric data drawn from various world areas. Topics include hunter-gatherers, the development of food production, changing social and trade networks, and prehistoric urbanism in the rise of hierarchical societies.
  
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    ANTH 333 - Prehistory of North America (3 credits)


    North America exhibits widespread archaeological diversity in the material culture and lifeways of ancient peoples. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the prehistory of different regions in North America. We will consider trends in subsistence and settlement, as well as cultural patterns, exchange, social complexity, and culture contact. Discussions will cover theoretical and methodological underpinnings of contemporary archaeological thought in North America, and explore some of the hotly debated issues currently at the forefront of North American archaeology. Case studies will be used to provide in-depth examples and as material for classroom dialogue. Finally, we will discuss culture contact arising from European exploration and settlement in the New World. Issues to be covered include disease, environmental degradation, religion, and resistance to European influence. F, S.
  
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    ANTH 345 - Archaeology of Plantations (3 credits)


    An archaeological analysis of antebellum plantations with an emphasis given to the significance of settlement patterns, spatial organization, architecture, lifeways, crop production, cemeteries, social and economic conditions, and how groups of artifacts speak to these varied topics and the complex relationships that existed between planters, overseers, and slaves.
  
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    ANTH 366 - Chinese Art and Archaeology (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 366 ) This course surveys the art and archaeology of early China focusing on major finds dating from the Neolithic through the Han dynasty. It also looks at how art historians and archaeologists use visual and material culture to reconstruct different aspects of early Chinese society and major issues relating to the practice of archaeology in China. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 371 - Introduction to Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology (3 credits)


    This course includes theoretical and applied forensic archaeological field methods, basic human osteology, and familiarization with medico-legal terms and concepts necessary for working with law enforcement and the medical community. This is an introductory course for students who desire a greater understanding of the applied aspects of anthropology as it engages with the criminal justice system. F, S.
  
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    ANTH 380 - Seminar in Archaeology (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ANTH 101 /ANTH 101L  or permission of the instructor) The seminar format offers students an opportunity to explore specific topics in archaeology. This course may be repeated when topics vary.
  
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    ANTH 381 - Museums and Communities (3 credits)


    (=HIST 392 ) This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of museum studies, covering the history, development, and definitions of a museum. This course will explore how museums function, including operations, interpretation and representation of the past, exhibitions, collections care, education, and public programs. Students in this course will examine current practices and issues in museums, with an emphasis on museums’ relationships to their communities, and their roles in society and culture. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 391 - Ethnographic Methods (3 credits)


    Ethnographic research is one of the hallmarks of the discipline of Anthropology. In this course, we will examine the development and application of various ethnographic methods, such as participant observation, interviews, surveys, and investigations of archival data. We will also explore the ways that anthropologists and other social scientists apply their ethnographic research skills in areas of education, business, and healthcare to find solutions to real world problems. Students will gain practical research experience by designing and executing semester-long ethnographic research projects. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 392 - Special Topics in Anthropology and Archaeology (3 credits)


    This course will include reading and research on selected anthropological or archaeological subjects. The course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  
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    ANTH 394 - Koobi Fora Field School (8 credits)


    (Prereq: ANTH 101 /ANTH 101L ) This course will introduce students to archaeological field and laboratory methods. In the field, students will learn techniques of archaeological excavation, mapping, and survey. They will help excavate archaeological localities that were buried from a few thousand years ago to almost two million years ago, search for fossil remains of hominids, help in trying to interpret what they find in the context of human biological and behavioral evolution, and learn the fundamentals of savanna ecosystems. S.
  
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    ANTH 395 Q - Prehistoric Archaeology Field School (4 to 12 credits)


    This course introduces students to prehistoric archaeological field and laboratory methods. In the field, students will learn techniques of archaeological excavation, mapping, and survey. Excavations are likely to recover evidence of historic and prehistoric habitation including tools, pottery, food remains, and hearths. During the field season, students will also spend time processing the collected artifacts at an archaeological laboratory. Processing will include washing, labeling, identifying, and analyzing archaeological materials. Students will have the opportunity to learn from professional archaeologists during demonstrations and guest lectures, and will compile their own artifact analyses. Discussions will also cover the practice of archaeology today, specifically addressing current state and federal laws dealing with the treatment and excavation of archaeological sites and museum collections. Assignments for this class may include textbook readings, a final paper, and a field journal. May, Su.
  
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    ANTH 396 Q - Historical Archaeology Field School (4 to 12 credits)


    This course will introduce students to historical archaeology and will cover field and laboratory methods including excavation, mapping, survey and consultation of historical sources in the interpretative process. An ethnographic component, where applicable, will also incorporate oral history, interviews or other data from descendant communities for an ethno-historical approach. Although not the primary focus, excavations may uncover prehistoric material. Archaeological inquiry includes but is not limited to: the built environment, ritual practices, ethnicity/identity, childhood, socio-economic realities, and other topics through the lens of material culture. Students will learn to process artifacts by washing, labeling, identifying, and analyzing them on site and in a laboratory. Students will gather historical data from museums and other archival sources with which to compare archaeological findings. May, Su.
  
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    ANTH 398 - Archaeological Field Research (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Students actively participate in prospecting, locating, excavating and evaluating a regional archaeological site. Students may register two times for this course, and are limited to a maximum of six hours credit.
  
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    ANTH 399 - Independent Study (1 to 6 credits)


    (Prereq: Written contract between student and instructor, approved by the department chair and dean) Directed study and/or research on specific topics.
  
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    ANTH 410 Q - Advanced Archaeological Methods (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ANTH 101 /ANTH 101L  or permission of the instructor) This course will provide an overview of the methods used by practicing archaeologists in the field and the laboratory. Discussions will cover theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the practice of archaeology, and will explore some of the most recent, cutting-edge techniques and technologies used today. Finally, we will discuss how our data and analysis inform our understanding and interpretation of the past. S.
  
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    ANTH 411 Q - Archaeological Records (3 credits)


    Archaeological records are all of the forms of data that make up the archaeological record, the material remains of past human activities. These include artifacts, ecofacts, and features. For some time periods and places, archaeological records also include documents, oral histories and oral traditions. This course involves the recording, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of archaeological data, including the preparation of technical documentation resulting from archaeological fieldwork. Archaeological Records covers a broad range of topics and activities fundamental to modern anthropological archaeology, beginning with the processing and cataloging of artifact assemblages. Consequently, a major component of this course consists of archaeological laboratory methods and techniques. Other topics include the preparation and management of technical records. These include survey and excavation forms, laboratory and field notes, state site files, regional and site maps, and the tabulation of archaeological data. Archaeological Records is organized as a laboratory course emphasizing student participation, independent study and instruction, and student-teacher interaction. Students should be self-motivated and eager to participate in the compilation, management, and interpretation of archaeological records. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 425 - Maritime Archaeology of the Americas (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ANTH 101 /ANTH 101L  or permission of the instructor) This course focuses on the watercraft of the Americas, from native origins through the variety of ships and boats built by European explorers, colonists and their descendants.
  
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    ANTH 427 - African Prehistory (3 credits)


    This course provides an introduction to the prehistory of Africa spanning the earliest emergence of humans until the period of early European contact. Among other topics, we will explore the rise and fall of some of the great African civilizations using an examination of material artifacts. This course takes a chronological approach, beginning with the archaeological evidence of our hominin ancestors, and will examine a range of case studies and archaeological examples. Topics covered may include subsistence and settlement, technology, exchange, social complexity, and culture contact.
  
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    ANTH 430 - Southeastern Archaeology (3 credits)


    Prehistoric and historic archaeology of the Southeastern United States provide an introduction to the Native peoples of the region and to the impact of European contact. Topics covered will include subsistence and settlement, cultural patterns, exchange, social complexity, and culture contact. F, S.
  
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    ANTH 432 - Careers in Archaeology: Cultural Resource Management (3 credits)


    This course provides important specialized knowledge for students who may seek careers in archaeology, history, or historic preservation. Cultural Resource Management (CRM) is the archaeology, history, and historic preservation research conducted in response to federal, state, and local laws. A large number of archaeologists work in CRM, and this course gives students the knowledge to understand the laws and practice for the treatment of archaeological sites and historic resources. The course takes a topical approach, and will explore how archaeologists, historians, and historic preservationists operate within the CRM industry.
  
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    ANTH 495 Q - Internship in Anthropology (1 to 12 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Internship opportunities across a wide range of institutions, agencies, organizations and businesses are available to students. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 498 - Capstone in Anthropology and Geography (3 credits)


    (=GEOG 498 ) (Prereq: ANTH 120 /GEOG 120  and ANTH 300 /GEOG 300 ) This course gives students the opportunity to synthesize the intersection of Anthropology and Geography in a capstone seminar that focuses on research and writing. Students will participate in readings, discussion, and a final paper that allows in-depth analysis of a selected case study. F, S, Su.
  
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    ANTH 499 - Senior Thesis (3 credits)


     (=GEOG 499 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) A course designed to assess and improve research skills, writing ability, and general mastery of the field. Under the close supervision of a member of the department, students will review primary and secondary source materials and write one 20-page thesis of graduate school quality. F, S, Su.

Arabic

  
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    ARA 110 - Beginning Arabic I (3 credits)


    The course introduces students to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) which is a key variety that is understood across the Arab World. The course aims at developing students’ basic communicative language skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking, as well as cultural awareness of the Arabic-speaking world which emphasizes the links between language, culture, history and Arab societies. Focus will also be put on highlighting deviations and intelligibility between Modern Standard Arabic and various Arabic dialects. The teaching/ learning process in this course is proficiency-oriented where emphasis is placed on the functional usage of Modern Standard Arabic. F.

Art Curatorial Studies

  
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    ARTC 365 - Practicum in Curatorial Studies I (3 credits)


    Students will explore issues relating to the curatorial process through the planning, design and installation of exhibitions. Students will develop graphic and exhibition design proposals, publications, community outreach and public relations strategy for an exhibition. Sessions will include registration, art handling, condition reporting, professional art shipping and receiving, environmental standards for storage and exhibition and the professional responsibilities of the curator.

Art Education

  
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    ARTE 310 - Introduction to Art Education (3 credits)


    Thematic approaches to art education will be discussed and applied through personal artmaking, lesson planning and experiences in community settings. Students will visit PK-12 schools and other educational sites and practice methods of digital documentation and reflective practice. Offered as needed.
  
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    ARTE 339 - Art for Middle Schools (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEL 329  or permission of the instructor) Methods of teaching the visual arts to middle school students. Major emphasis will be given to the investigation and development of appropriate grade-level studio production, art in history, and aesthetic experiences. Offered as needed.
  
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    ARTE 340 - The School Art Program (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEL 329  or permission of the instructor) An introduction to art education as a profession. Students will examine the historical development of art in education, current issues and trends in art education, and prominent rationales for art in the schools. Methods for evaluation of art programs and student art products will be explored.
  
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    ARTE 349 - Methods and Materials for Teaching Art (3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEL 329  or permission of the instructor) Students will develop art learning units with relevant teaching support materials organized around specific art concepts and art materials. Methods for evaluation of art programs and student art products will be explored. Emphasis is placed on secondary schools.
  
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    ARTE 379 - Cultural Foundations of Art/Craft in Art Education (3 credits)


    Students will learn to create art using traditional and contemporary craft media and techniques as applicable to K-12 art instruction. Students will also develop an understanding of the forms and functions of non-Eurocentric art across world cultures. Method of instruction will include an examination of relevant researched supported materials and assessment methodologies.
  
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    ARTE 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: EDEL 329 ) For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations section in this catalog. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. F, S, Su.
  
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    ARTE 499 - Directed Undergraduate Research (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor, approved course contract, and if applicable, field site permission obtained) Selected and structured undergraduate research projects conducted with faculty direction and possible participation. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics. F, S, Su.

Art Graphic Design

  
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    ARTD 108 - A Survey of Graphic Design (3 credits)


    A comprehensive survey of graphic design from ancient history to the present. This course will look at significant movements, figures and technological advancements. It will include a basic introduction to the language, issues, and concerns of graphic artists and the various communication vehicles used. F, S.
  
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    ARTD 201 - Graphic Design I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103 ) (Computer Usage) An introductory course addressing the role of the professional designer in visual communications. Strategies, techniques and software used in the electronic design process are addressed. Topics covered are layout, design, typography, illustration, web design and desktop publishing. F, S.
  
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    ARTD 202 - Graphic Design II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103  and ARTD 201 ) (Computer Usage) A course exploring printing and reproduction methods. Projects focus on printing processes and the production of camera ready art. Extensive use of the computer as a graphic design tool. F, S.
  
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    ARTD 205 - Web Design I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 202 ) Beginning to intermediate-level studio work in web media, graphics and website structure. Graphic design software, website layout and HTML will be used to explore navigation, aesthetics, strategy, concept and organization with an emphasis on the user experience.
  
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    ARTD 301 - Graphic Design III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 202 ) A combined graphic design history and intermediate studio practice course focusing on process, creative problem solving, research, and design context. F, S.
  
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    ARTD 302 - Graphic Design IV (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 301 ) Further study in graphic design processes, information formats and systems. Projects include catalogues, reports, magazines, signage, and corporate information systems. Extensive use of desktop publishing. F, S.
  
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    ARTD 303 - Illustration (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 202 ) Introduction to the ideas and illustrative techniques used in visual communication. Students will explore traditional media including pen, pencil, wash, charcoal, Conte crayon and colored pencil. They will use an illustration program and image scanning extensively to produce topical illustrations for a variety of publications, ads and brochures.
  
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    ARTD 304 - Motion Design I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 202 ) A beginning exploration of design using animation, sound and design for TV, film and web with an emphasis on the viewer’s experience. Students will gain knowledge of the design process for time-based media by developing storyboard concepts that will be turned into final movies. F.
  
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    ARTD 305 - Web Design II (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 205 ) A beginning to intermediate level exploration of Flash layout and animation design for the web with a continued emphasis on interface design and the user experience.
  
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    ARTD 306 - Web Design III (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 305 ) Advanced use and exploration of both static and motion-based web design software and methods, with a particular interest in producing sites that use a hybrid of the two. Projects will focus on taking complex websites from concept to completion.
  
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    ARTD 308 - Advanced Typography (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 202 ) A continuation of typography skills and techniques learned in ARTD 201  and ARTD 202 , Advanced Typography addresses typographic history, systems, narrative and experiment within a framework of theoretical and real-world problems. The computer will be an important tool, along with alternative methods, such as hand-generated elements.
  
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    ARTD 309 - Packaging Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 202 ) An introduction to the history and production of packaging. Students will explore printing processes associated with the production of packaging as well as branding, point of purchase, and use of color and typography. Folding, scoring, shelf space and market targeting will also be integrated into the projects. Students will design and produce everything from labels to complete packages for real world products.
  
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    ARTD 399 - Independent Study (1 to 3 credits)


    For more information, see the Non-Traditional Coursework in the Academic Regulations section in this catalog. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics.
  
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    ARTD 400 - Publication Design (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 302) Publication Design will focus on the history and purpose of different types of publications. Newspapers, books, magazines, annual reports, newsletters, blogs, Web pages, and e-newsletters will be among those investigated. Students will explore the production and design approach to each and how the use of color and typography affect the reception by the public.
  
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    ARTD 401 - Advanced Graphic Design I (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 302 ) Advanced problems in advertising, promotion, packaging, and poster design. Projects include development of presentation techniques. Extensive use of digital technology and photography.
  
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    ARTD 440 Q - Pre-Professional Studio (3 to 6 credits)


    (=ARTH 440  or ARTS 440 ) (Prereq: permission of the instructor) A pre-professional studio course that will provide various art-related service to small businesses, non-profit organizations, and departments throughout the University. Students will gain first hand, real-world experiences through client driven projects that may include graphic design, photography, and curatorial services. Participants will also learn how to maintain client relationships, time management, design and development, implementation and final production. This course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. F, S.
  
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    ARTD 450 Q - Ashes2Art: Digital Reconstructions of Ancient Monuments (3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) Ashes2Art combines cutting edge digital technologies, art history, graphic and web design, and digital photography to recreate monuments of the ancient past. The course is completely hands-on and provides an extraordinary opportunity for students to combine various skills from disparate disciplines. Students will conduct focused research on a specific monument (or city or object), write essays that summarize various opinions, and document those sources with an extended bibliography. Students then incorporate that research into a web-based project utilizing cutting edge technologies, including Adobe Photoshop, Google Earth, Sketch Up, Panoweaver, Tourweaver, Studio Max, Dreamweaver, Cinema 4D and Macromedia Flash animation. S.
  
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    ARTD 495 - Graphic Design Internship (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTS 103 , ARTS 104 , ARTS 111 , ARTS 112 , ARTH 105 , ARTH 106 , ARTD 201 , and ARTD 202 ) (Coreq: junior standing, 2.0 GPA or better, and permission of the department chair) Application for the internship cannot be obtained without first receiving permission from the chair of the department. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester. (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course objective, course requirements and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties: the student faculty supervisor, chair of the department and the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal and when possible build a portfolio. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization during the semester by the coordinator of internships.
  
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    ARTD 496 - Graphic Design Internship II (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 495  and permission of the department chair) Application must be obtained from the chair of the department before applying. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks a t 10 hours per week). The application states the course objective, course requirements and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties: the student faculty supervisor, chair of the department and the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal and when possible build a portfolio. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization during the semester by the coordinator of internships. This internship opportunity is open only to students who have already taken ARTD 495 .
  
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    ARTD 497 Q - Graphic Design Senior Capstone (3 credits)


    (Prereq: ARTD 302 ) Advanced problems in both the print and web areas of graphic design, emphasizing a versatile, well-rounded and high-quality portfolio that will serve students as they pursue employment in the design field. Students will be expected to purchase a portfolio case for printed samples and also to produce a digital portfolio that will be displayed on the internet. F, S.
  
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    ARTD 499 - Special Topics in Graphic Design (1 to 3 credits)


    (Prereq: permission of the instructor) In-depth investigation of specific topics and media not generally available in the curriculum. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.

Art History

  
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    ARTH 105 - History of Western Art I (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 105H ) A survey of the visual arts and their relevance to their times from the Paleolithic period through the Gothic period. F, S.
  
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    ARTH 106 - History of Western Art II (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 106H ) A survey of the visual arts and their relevance to their times from the Renaissance to the present. F, S.
  
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    ARTH 107 - World Art (3 credits)


    (=ARTH 107H ) A survey of World art from prehistory to the present, including but not limited to African, Asian, Islamic, and Oceanic art as well as art of the Americas, exploring diverse cultural experiences from a visual perspective. F, S.
  
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    ARTH 110 - Introduction to American Film (3 credits)


    This course presents an introduction to American film history, focusing on the aesthetic, technological, and social developments that shaped the medium and culture in the twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on full length screenings, with dissection of formal content as well as historical context, and technical aspects of the medium. F, S.
  
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    ARTH 210 - Greek Art and Archaeology (3 credits)


    This course surveys the art and archaeology of ancient Greece, introducing the major monuments of Greek architecture, sculpture, and painting from the Iron Age through the Hellenistic period. Special emphasis will be placed on artistic and architectural innovations, as well as on archaeological context. F, S.
  
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    ARTH 211 Q* - Roman Art and Architecture (3 credits)


    This course surveys the art and architecture of ancient Rome and its provinces, from the founding of the Roman Republic to the end of the Roman Empire. Some topics covered include the function of art and architecture in ancient Rome, the relationship of Greek and Roman art, imperial portraiture, games and spectacles, and the houses of Pompeii. F. S.
 

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